1. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    15 Nov '13 09:24
    http://phys.org/news/2013-11-quantum-world.html

    “...A normally fragile quantum state has been shown to survive at room temperature for a world record 39 minutes, overcoming a key barrier towards building ultrafast quantum computers. ...”
  2. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    15 Nov '13 09:40
    Just found this that also may be used for quantum computers:

    http://phys.org/news/2013-11-photon-absorbing.html

    "Seeing a photon without absorbing it
    ...
    ...
    ...A single photon can be detected repeatedly by combining several nondestructive devices. This also provides new possibilities for using single photons in quantum communication and quantum information processing. The successful transfer of a photon in a quantum network could be detected without destroying the fragile quantum information encoded in it. Based on the mechanism used for single-photon detection, it should also be possible to realize a deterministic, universal quantum gate between a reflected single photon and the single atom and even between two photons. Because quantum gates are the functional building blocks of a quantum computer, this is a long-standing dream in optical quantum computing"

    What? Can detect a photon without absorbing it!? I thought that was physically impossible! Well, I learn something new every day.
  3. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    15 Nov '13 12:32
    Originally posted by humy
    Just found this that also may be used for quantum computers:

    http://phys.org/news/2013-11-photon-absorbing.html

    "Seeing a photon without absorbing it
    ...
    ...
    ...A single photon can be detected repeatedly by combining several nondestructive devices. This also provides new possibilities for using single photons in quantum communication and quantum inform ...[text shortened]... absorbing it!? I thought that was physically impossible! Well, I learn something new every day.
    It might be like testing for water by using a single atom probe that sits above the water and interacts via electromagnetic fields just on the edge of detectability, like how an atomic force microscope works but more subtle.