1. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    16 Jul '18 08:166 edits
    https://phys.org/news/2018-07-x-ray-triggered-nano-bubbles-cancer.html

    If a way like this can be developed to make the drug be active only where it is needed (i.e. only in the cancer tissue) then that should eliminate most of the nasty side effects with means we can give a higher dose of the drug and high enough to kill ALL the cancer without making the patient sick so this would be a real cure.

    In this case they put the drug in liposomes that only break down to release the drug when exposed to x-rays so that they can then selectively target the cancer with x-rays to make the drug mainly locally be released there which is about where it is needed.

    But I cannot help wonder if those same liposomes couldn't be redesigned to respond (by releasing the drug) to some chemical receptor on the cancer cell's surface that isn't on non-cancer cells and thus not only eliminate the need for the x-rays but make it even more selective because using x-rays still inevitably means many non-cancerous cells are inadvertently attacked by being also exposed to those x-rays?
    I would think this should make it even better and even work when the cancer has already spread all over the body so to make it completely impractical to target with x-rays.
  2. Joined
    20 Oct '06
    Moves
    6975
    01 Aug '18 19:55
    Originally posted by @humy
    But I cannot help wonder if those same liposomes couldn't be redesigned to respond (by releasing the drug) to some chemical receptor on the cancer cell's surface that isn't on non-cancer cells and thus not only eliminate the need for the x-rays but make it even more selective because using x-rays still inevitably means many non-cancerous cells are inadvertentl ...[text shortened]... has already spread all over the body so to make it completely impractical to target with x-rays.
    These are generally referred to as prodrugs. Typically, the are inactive/non-toxic until they undergo an enzymatic conversion into the active drug. In chemotherapy approaches, the goal is to utilize enzymes that are "overexpressed" in cancer cells for targeting and improved pharmacokinetics. Doesn't always work, but the concept is useful at least.
  3. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52612
    04 Aug '18 13:50
    Originally posted by @wildgrass
    These are generally referred to as prodrugs. Typically, the are inactive/non-toxic until they undergo an enzymatic conversion into the active drug. In chemotherapy approaches, the goal is to utilize enzymes that are "overexpressed" in cancer cells for targeting and improved pharmacokinetics. Doesn't always work, but the concept is useful at least.
    There is also this: Turmeric.

    https://www.sciencealert.com/turmeric-linked-to-helping-with-Alzheimers-cancer-diabetes-arthritis

    I think I will follow his advice, even though I am not a great fan of curry....
  4. Standard memberHandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
    At the edge
    Joined
    23 Sep '06
    Moves
    18031
    03 Sep '18 04:13
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    There is also this: Turmeric.

    https://www.sciencealert.com/turmeric-linked-to-helping-with-Alzheimers-cancer-diabetes-arthritis

    I think I will follow his advice, even though I am not a great fan of curry....
    Check with your doctor first, especially if you take a blood thinner.
Back to Top