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  1. Standard member O Artem O
    ParTizan
    31 Dec '08 19:13
    as i see it the more mass you have the easier it is for you to lift a larger weight(to some point).

    is there a way to figure out approximately for your weight what you will be able to lift? and in theory your max lift will be if you were converted to 100% energy and the energy did the "lifting" for you?
  2. 31 Dec '08 20:15
    Originally posted by O Artem O
    as i see it the more mass you have the easier it is for you to lift a larger weight(to some point).

    is there a way to figure out approximately for your weight what you will be able to lift? and in theory your max lift will be if you were converted to 100% energy and the energy did the "lifting" for you?
    The more mass you have doesn't necessarily mean it's easier for you to lift a larger weight. I'm assuming you mean muscle mass since there are people who have more fat mass and can't lift much.

    I'm not sure how you would do the calculations you mentioned, but I suppose it's possible with some simplifications.
  3. Standard member O Artem O
    ParTizan
    31 Dec '08 20:58 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by PsychoPawn
    The more mass you have doesn't necessarily mean it's easier for you to lift a larger weight. I'm assuming you mean muscle mass since there are people who have more fat mass and can't lift much.
    i am not talking about ppl that are 500 pounds, i will be hard to lift 100 pounds if ur like 60, but easier if ur like 150, ppl in good health in the 20-30, of course it depends if ur athletic or not but still

    Originally posted by PsychoPawn
    I'm not sure how you would do the calculations you mentioned, but I suppose it's possible with some simplifications.
    yes just an approximation, i understand there is a lot of factors that go in to this.
  4. Standard member flexmore
    Quack Quack Quack !
    01 Jan '09 04:10 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by O Artem O
    as i see it the more mass you have the easier it is for you to lift a larger weight(to some point).

    is there a way to figure out approximately for your weight what you will be able to lift? and in theory your max lift will be if you were converted to 100% energy and the energy did the "lifting" for you?
    from reality:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Olympic_records_in_weightlifting

    it seems that:
    men in 56 kg class lift about 2.7 times their own weight
    men in 100 kg class lift about 2.2 times their own weight
    women in 48 kg class lift about 2.2 times their own weight
    women in 56 kg class lift about 1.9 times their own weight

    Clearly heavier people lift a lower mulitple of their own weight.

    As for "if you were converted to 100% energy and the energy did the "lifting" for you?" - you need to clarify ... are you wanting to be silly and consider
    1/ burning your energy dense molecules to make CO2 and similar low energy molecules? (perhaps lifting a few dozen tons a meter or two)
    Or can we get seriously idealistic and use
    2/ E=MC^2 and convert you to pure energy(something we have no idea how to do)? (lifting an ENORMOUS weight a meter or two)
  5. Standard member flexmore
    Quack Quack Quack !
    01 Jan '09 06:24 / 1 edit
    For perfect conversion to energy:

    if gravitational potential energy is mgh, where m=80kg (a person's weight), g=9.8 and h=1 meter

    and also E=MC^2 where C~300,000,000

    then the mass lifted one meter by an 80kg person would be about 7x10^18 kg (this is about 20 million times heavier than the entire human population).
  6. Standard member flexmore
    Quack Quack Quack !
    01 Jan '09 09:12
    Originally posted by flexmore
    For perfect conversion to energy:

    if gravitational potential energy is mgh, where m=80kg (a person's weight), g=9.8 and h=1 meter

    and also E=MC^2 where C~300,000,000

    then the mass lifted one meter by an 80kg person would be about 7x10^18 kg (this is about 20 million times heavier than the entire human population).
    slight aritmetic error:

    number of people lifted 1meter will be C^2/g,

    which is 9x10^15 people,

    which is about 1.5 million times the current population of 6 billion.
  7. Standard member peacedog
    Highlander
    01 Jan '09 17:44 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by flexmore
    slight aritmetic error:

    number of people lifted 1meter will be C^2/g,

    which is 9x10^15 people,

    which is about 1.5 million times the current population of 6 billion.
    EDIT: Was going to make a sarcastic comment about the magnitude of the error, but I ended up getting my own sums wrong.
  8. Standard member flexmore
    Quack Quack Quack !
    01 Jan '09 21:22
    Originally posted by peacedog
    EDIT: Was going to make a sarcastic comment about the magnitude of the error, but I ended up getting my own sums wrong.
    If you want a look at magnitude errors ... have a look at "graham's number".
  9. Standard member sasquatch672
    Don't Like It Leave
    03 Jan '09 21:53
    Originally posted by flexmore
    For perfect conversion to energy:

    if gravitational potential energy is mgh, where m=80kg (a person's weight), g=9.8 and h=1 meter

    and also E=MC^2 where C~300,000,000

    then the mass lifted one meter by an 80kg person would be about 7x10^18 kg (this is about 20 million times heavier than the entire human population).
    Stop yourself. Just stop. The guy asked a reasonable question and you start talking about the speed of light.
  10. Standard member O Artem O
    ParTizan
    04 Jan '09 17:41
    Originally posted by sasquatch672
    Stop yourself. Just stop. The guy asked a reasonable question and you start talking about the speed of light.
    ahah lol


    tnx all just wondering
  11. Standard member Thequ1ck
    Fast above
    06 Jan '09 20:36
    Originally posted by O Artem O
    as i see it the more mass you have the easier it is for you to lift a larger weight(to some point).

    is there a way to figure out approximately for your weight what you will be able to lift? and in theory your max lift will be if you were converted to 100% energy and the energy did the "lifting" for you?
    Easy, how many pulley's are involved?