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  1. Standard member StarValleyWy
    BentnevolentDictater
    13 Feb '10 00:03 / 3 edits
    I have often wondered what gives a neutron the ability to just keep going and going and going... for so long.

    Is there conservation of energy at the quantum level? If so, doesn't that imply friction? Assuming that we can rightly expand the meaning of friction to include "the interaction of individual quantum stuff with its quantum soup".

    Maybe I shouldn't think that the description -- "individual" -- can apply to the quantum realm? Has this ever been addressed?

    Is there a relationship between dark energy and the quantum world that gives a ... "Something"... to all matter, thus keeping it all in a seemingly, or impied "constant" energy state? Is there a relationship between the rate of expansion of the universe and the lessening quantum energy levels of matter?

    In short, why do things spin? Why doesn't the universe seem to be able to deliver a knuckle ball?

    Does a graviton spin? I would guess that it does not, and that it is the reason that it is so "different".

    btw... I am aware that a Neutron is many orders of powers larger than Planck level QED. That only improves the mystery.
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    13 Feb '10 04:16
    Originally posted by StarValleyWy
    I have often wondered what gives a neutron the ability to just keep going and going and going... for so long.

    Is there conservation of energy at the quantum level? If so, doesn't that imply friction? Assuming that we can rightly expand the meaning of friction to include "the interaction of individual quantum stuff with its quantum soup".

    Maybe I s ...[text shortened]... many orders of powers larger than Planck level QED. That only improves the mystery.
    I recommend you read up on "conservation of angular momentum". It's interesting to think about how this relates to the rifling on a bullet.
  3. Standard member StarValleyWy
    BentnevolentDictater
    13 Feb '10 04:23 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    I recommend you read up on "conservation of angular momentum". It's interesting to think about how this relates to the rifling on a bullet.
    Yes, but from whence comes eternal energy? Or does this thing have magic?

    A trillion years is a long time to conserve that which is a mystery? No?

    I think that one concept that I am weak on is "Time".

    I forget that at the holy grail "Speed Of Light", there is no "time".

    My bad. But if this is the case then what meaning has "Quantum", as it is all outside of "time"?

    I still want to know about how we all just accept that a Neutron can spin for eterinity without any apparent "help" from an "outside" that can't exist.
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    13 Feb '10 04:46
    Originally posted by StarValleyWy
    Yes, but from whence comes eternal energy? Or does this thing have magic?

    A trillion years is a long time to conserve that which is a mystery? No?
    You don't need energy to keep something spinning.
  5. Standard member StarValleyWy
    BentnevolentDictater
    13 Feb '10 04:48
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    You don't need energy to keep something spinning.
    So there are no forces as the Atomic or Planck states? Things just merrily spin because they spin?

    Ok. Saying that there are "no forces" at those levels, how does the universe "hang together"?

    I would think that "being" impies "energy"?
  6. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    13 Feb '10 07:12 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by StarValleyWy
    So there are no forces as the Atomic or Planck states? Things just merrily spin because they spin?

    Ok. Saying that there are "no forces" at those levels, how does the universe "hang together"?

    I would think that "being" impies "energy"?
    I have no idea where that first sentence came from. It doesn't in the slightest follow from what I wrote.

    Yes, things just merrily spin because they spin, and because nothing stops them.

    The rest of your post is nonsensical as far as I can tell.

    EDIT - Forces can exist without exerting energy. You should brush up on your classical mechanics.
  7. Standard member StarValleyWy
    BentnevolentDictater
    13 Feb '10 08:12
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    I have no idea where that first sentence came from. It doesn't in the slightest follow from what I wrote.

    Yes, things just merrily spin because they spin, and because nothing stops them.

    The rest of your post is nonsensical as far as I can tell.

    EDIT - Forces can exist without exerting energy. You should brush up on your classical mechanics.
    Classical Mechanics?

    Ok.

    Thank you for such an illuminating treatise. I would never have dared think that a question about Quantum Mechanics would be answerable to Newtonian Physics. Thanks for giving all you have to give. Now go lie down with a sheep and try not to father any more of your kind.

    BBBBaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa! Daddy! Where are you? Bbbaaaaaaaaaaaa!

    For those who are new to RHP... the "thousand dead babies" and I have a history. Like "No Sheist!"
  8. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    13 Feb '10 08:20 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by StarValleyWy
    Classical Mechanics?

    Ok.

    Thank you for such an illuminating treatise. I would never have dared think that a question about Quantum Mechanics would be answerable to Newtonian Physics. Thanks for giving all you have to give. Now go lie down with a sheep and try not to father any more of your kind.

    BBBBaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa! Daddy! Where are you? Bbba ...[text shortened]... ose who are new to RHP... the "thousand dead babies" and I have a history. Like "No Sheist!"
    You are referring to a classical phenomenon, not a quantum phenomenon. If you use the incredibly complex quantum mechanical equations you'll get the same answer. That's why classical mechanics works.

    I won the Jet Propulsion Laboratories award for physics student of the year when I studied classical mechanics. I've taken an upper division courses in quantum mechanics for physics majors at the top physical chemistry program in the world.

    You're making no sense.

    EDIT - By Planck State you mean a singularity right?

    EDIT2 - By Noether's Theorem conservation of angular momentum follows from the angular symmetry of space. The extension of this theorem into quantum field theory is called the Ward-Takahashi identities.
  9. Standard member StarValleyWy
    BentnevolentDictater
    13 Feb '10 11:04
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    You are referring to a classical phenomenon, not a quantum phenomenon. If you use the incredibly complex quantum mechanical equations you'll get the same answer. That's why classical mechanics works.

    I won the Jet Propulsion Laboratories award for physics student of the year when I studied classical mechanics. I've taken an upper division course ...[text shortened]... xtension of this theorem into quantum field theory is called the Ward-Takahashi identities.
    LOL

    Why would a person argue with such a genius as you?

    Even though you can't quite get the singular and plural of " I've taken an upper division courses " figured out. Sigh.

    Why do you insist on being such a toid? You are a very minor league elementary school teacher. Which part of "You are no genius" do you not understand?

    Go away. You are bothersome.
  10. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    13 Feb '10 11:17
    Originally posted by StarValleyWy
    LOL

    Why would a person argue with such a genius as you?

    Even though you can't quite get the singular and plural of " I've taken an upper division courses " figured out. Sigh.

    Why do you insist on being such a toid? You are a very minor league elementary school teacher. Which part of "You are no genius" do you not understand?

    Go away. You are bothersome.
    You're criticising my English? LOL.

    There are no spaces between quotes and what they are quoting. Where's the rest of the "Even though" sentence?

    Now another idiot tries to wish me away. That doesn't work people!
  11. 13 Feb '10 11:20 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by StarValleyWy
    LOL

    Why would a person argue with such a genius as you?

    Even though you can't quite get the singular and plural of " I've taken an upper division courses " figured out. Sigh.

    Why do you insist on being such a toid? You are a very minor league elementary school teacher. Which part of "You are no genius" do you not understand?

    Go away. You are bothersome.
    And at exactly this point the dabate went over from interesting discussion to mere flaming.

    I usually say that if your argumentation is as low as criticizing spelling and grammer, and name calling, then you don't have any arguments at all.

    Your thread title "What makes a thing spin for a trillion years?"
    I would answer: "Not yet it hasn't, as not even the universe isn't that old."
  12. 14 Feb '10 08:13
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TOID

    TOID

    A TOID (TOpographic IDentifier, pronounced toyed) is a unique reference identifier assigned by the Ordnance Survey to identify every feature in Great Britain. The identifier consists of two parts, a prefix ‘osgb’ and a unique identifier that is 13-16 digits long. Within GML, a TOID is also referred to as an FID (Feature Identifier).
  13. 14 Feb '10 08:19
    Originally posted by StarValleyWy
    I have often wondered what gives a neutron the ability to just keep going and going and going... for so long.

    Is there conservation of energy at the quantum level? If so, doesn't that imply friction? Assuming that we can rightly expand the meaning of friction to include "the interaction of individual quantum stuff with its quantum soup".

    Maybe I s ...[text shortened]... many orders of powers larger than Planck level QED. That only improves the mystery.
    didn't you just come into some money?

    ----

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutron_source

    Small sized devices

    Radioisotopes which undergo spontaneous fission
    Certain isotopes undergo spontaneous fission with emission of neutrons. The most commonly used spontaneous fission source is the radioactive isotope californium-252. Cf-252 and all other spontaneous fission neutron sources are produced by irradiating uranium or another transuranic element in a nuclear reactor, where neutrons are absorbed in the starting material and its subsequent reaction products, transmuting the starting material into the SF isotope. Cf-252 neutron sources are typically 1/4" to 1/2" in diameter and 1" to 2" in length. When purchased new a typical Cf-252 neutron sources emit between 1×107 to 1×109 neutrons per second but, with a half life of 2.6 years, this neutron output rate drops to half of this original value in 2.6 years. The price of a typical Cf-252 neutron source is from $15,000 to $20,000.
  14. 14 Feb '10 08:55
    do neutrons spin?
  15. Standard member smw6869
    Granny
    14 Feb '10 13:51
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    do neutrons spin?
    Yes and they dance also.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1WMADiF6AM

    GRANNY.