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Science Forum

  1. 12 Feb '09 11:01 / 1 edit
    http://science.nasa.gov/realtime/satlookup.aspx?sc=1993-058B

    Is it an orbit counterwise the rotation of earth and steadily declining in height?

    Or not: http://dictionary.die.net/geosynchronous

    I got it. It's an orbit with 24 hours per rotation and ever declining towards earth, right?
  2. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    12 Feb '09 14:40
    Originally posted by Jigtie
    http://science.nasa.gov/realtime/satlookup.aspx?sc=1993-058B

    Is it an orbit counterwise the rotation of earth and steadily declining in height?

    Or not: http://dictionary.die.net/geosynchronous

    I got it. It's an orbit with 24 hours per rotation and ever declining towards earth, right?
    I think, just looking at the word 'inclined', it would be something like a geosync orbit but instead of being somewhere on the equator where it stays more or less in one place over some point on the ground at around 38,000 Km up, it has a slightly different orbit that goes say, 45 degrees from the equator, in this example halfway between a full equatorial orbit and a polar orbit which would see the north and south poles in each orbit, instead it is over one latitude line, still taking 24 hours to orbit but going north of the equator and then south of the equator at whatever the inclination from the equator you end up with. It could be just a few Kilometers or thousands depending on the angle but it should stay say, on 0 degrees latitude and people on the ground would see it move as if it were cycling back and forth going north then south over the 0 degree line but still taking 24 hours to do it. That's my interpretation anyway.
  3. Standard member leisurelysloth
    Man of Steel
    12 Feb '09 23:04
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclined_orbit
  4. 13 Feb '09 06:44
    Originally posted by leisurelysloth
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclined_orbit
    It says "In the case of an inclined geosynchronous orbit, although the satellite remains geosynchronous (that is, completing one orbit around the earth every 24 hours), it is no longer geostationary."

    And now I learned the difference between geosynchronous and geostationary. Until now I thought "inclined geosynchronous orbit" was an oxymoron. I was wrong. Thanks.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    13 Feb '09 16:02
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    It says "In the case of an inclined geosynchronous orbit, although the satellite remains geosynchronous (that is, completing one orbit around the earth every 24 hours), it is no longer geostationary."

    And now I learned the difference between geosynchronous and geostationary. Until now I thought "inclined geosynchronous orbit" was an oxymoron. I was wrong. Thanks.
    So it is like I imagined, it sounds like.