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  1. 17 Mar '17 17:32 / 4 edits
    https://techxplore.com/news/2017-03-guilt-free-no-slaughter-fried-chicken-wings.html

    This isn't actually a new idea; It's growing meat from animal cells without the whole animal.

    I make a prediction, all farm-origined meat will one day be produced this way because one day it would not only be vastly more environmentally friendly and not only guaranteed cruelty-free meat and be less likely to cause food poisoning but would also eventually be cheaper.
  2. 17 Mar '17 19:51
    The presenter said in the video that the cells are fed oxygen and minerals to grow into meat fit for human consumption.

    I don't buy that. No chlorophyll? Where is the energy coming from?
  3. 17 Mar '17 19:53
    Originally posted by humy
    I make a prediction, all farm-origined meat will one day be produced this way
    You mean 'factory originated'. It will put many farmers out of business.
  4. Standard member apathist
    looking for loot
    17 Mar '17 20:53
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    It will put many farmers out of business.
    I wonder why you mention that. Any reason?
  5. 17 Mar '17 21:19
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    The presenter said in the video that the cells are fed oxygen and minerals to grow into meat fit for human consumption.

    I don't buy that. No chlorophyll? Where is the energy coming from?
    My understanding is that the energy source comes from cow serum, just like almost all cell culture systems in use today.

    So it's not like they're replacing animals here just yet. There is possibly a serum-free solution, but I have to think that it would be very expensive to produce meat in this way. And I also think the energy input is actually greater than that what is needed for real chicken. I'm not sure where they're getting statistics that it saves energy, but it really sounds like marketing/branding to make it seem like a clean energy product.
  6. 17 Mar '17 22:38 / 4 edits
    Originally posted by apathist
    ... Any reason?
    Because some farmers farm cows which fart out vast volumes of methane which contributes to global warming?
  7. 18 Mar '17 07:55
    Originally posted by apathist
    I wonder why you mention that. Any reason?
    My sister is a farmer (cattle, pigs and eggs).
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    18 Mar '17 15:36 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    My sister is a farmer (cattle, pigs and eggs).
    Well, for now farmers are safe due to the pesky detail of that stuff costing $9000 a pound....

    My daughter Heather is a vegetarian and I asked her if she would eat meat manufactured like that and she said yes, so I think there will be a market for it if the price comes down to something reasonable.
  9. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    18 Mar '17 15:38
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    The presenter said in the video that the cells are fed oxygen and minerals to grow into meat fit for human consumption.

    I don't buy that. No chlorophyll? Where is the energy coming from?
    Why would animal tissue need chlorophyll, do you mean sugars?
  10. 18 Mar '17 16:41
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    Why would animal tissue need chlorophyll, do you mean sugars?
    I mean any form of energy. The article said that only oxygen and minerals are added. My chlorophyll point was that plants mostly survive on oxygen and minerals, but animals need food. Mostly I was pointing out that they have clearly got something wrong.

    But if the food is coming from plants, then the question is how efficiently it is processed relative to the way animals do it. The usual complaints about meat are:
    1. Animal cruelty.
    2. Energy efficiency (they require many times their weight in plant matter, using up vast areas of land to grow their feed stock). (on a side note, this is only true in some cases. In other places, animals are a bonus and actually good for the land).
    3. In the case of cattle, there is the methane production. This is because of how the cows convert plant matter to absorbable sugars. It would be interesting to know how this company does it. Can they take ordinary grass (like cows do) or must they use corn (which takes far more land and water etc per unit weight to produce)
  11. 18 Mar '17 16:43
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    My daughter Heather is a vegetarian and I asked her if she would eat meat manufactured like that and she said yes, so I think there will be a market for it if the price comes down to something reasonable.
    If it was reasonably priced, I might too. I also support eating insects - something I haven't yet seen available in South Africa.
    I would probably also consume a lot more soya and less meat if I knew how to cook it easily and with a nice taste.
  12. Standard member vivify
    rain
    18 Mar '17 23:02
    Originally posted by humy


    I make a prediction, all farm-origined meat will one day be produced this way because one day it would not only be vastly more environmentally friendly and not only guaranteed cruelty-free meat and be less likely to cause food poisoning but would also eventually be cheaper.
    Maybe not in the U.S., given how pharmaceutical and oil companies always seem to beat down possible threats to their empires.
  13. 19 Mar '17 02:31 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I mean any form of energy. The article said that only oxygen and minerals are added. My chlorophyll point was that plants mostly survive on oxygen and minerals, but animals need food. Mostly I was pointing out that they have clearly got something wrong.

    But if the food is coming from plants, then the question is how efficiently it is processed relative ...[text shortened]... s do) or must they use corn (which takes far more land and water etc per unit weight to produce)
    Where the hell did you go to school? Plants consume CO2 and produce O2http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=2860
  14. 19 Mar '17 09:11
    Originally posted by kquinn909
    Where the hell did you go to school? Plants consume CO2 and produce O2http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=2860
    No need for the rudeness. I am well aware of what plants consume. Look for the word 'mostly' in my post, and look at how I phrased it in reference to the OP articles claims.
  15. Standard member vivify
    rain
    19 Mar '17 22:55
    Originally posted by kquinn909
    Where the hell did you go to school? Plants consume CO2 and produce O2http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=2860
    Botanically speaking, a coconut is a fibrous one-seeded drupe, also known as a dry drupe.