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Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. 30 Mar '10 04:49
    There is certainly precipitation in the winter and stormy weather.

    Is there a minimum temperature that lightening can occur?
  2. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    30 Mar '10 05:25
    Originally posted by mlprior
    There is certainly precipitation in the winter and stormy weather.

    Is there a minimum temperature that lightening can occur?
    I think it has to do with less humidity in the air in winter, it's funny, that is also the time we get zapped the most from static electricity too! Also less humidity means less updrafts so less energy available for static charges in the clouds. Seems ironic that you get less static in the atmosphere but more static on the ground right to our fingers, eh.
  3. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    30 Mar '10 06:05
    Originally posted by mlprior
    There is certainly precipitation in the winter and stormy weather.

    Is there a minimum temperature that lightening can occur?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thundersnow