1. Subscribersonhouse
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    11 Apr '15 17:30
    http://phys.org/news/2015-04-material-cooling-industry.html#nRlv
  2. SubscriberPonderable
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    12 Apr '15 14:05
    This reads like a press release rather than a meaningful report.

    So this Professor Shane Stadler found some new material exhibiting am magnetocaloric effect and applied for a patent seven years ago. This patent has not yet been granted, a surefire hint that there is a lot of legal work in the making which is hindering the claim to be granted...

    In fact I work on the stuf five years now and we are on the process engineering aprt of it. To have an efficient cooling machine, you have to have a series of these materials with slightly difefrent jumping temperatures. you need to put in and eget out the heat, so you need them to be incoprorated in high efficient heat exchanegrs, but still well defined. This is the task. To find new materials is less of a problem.

    Oh and it might take still some years for an application in household...
  3. Subscribersonhouse
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    12 Apr '15 21:403 edits
    Originally posted by Ponderable
    This reads like a press release rather than a meaningful report.

    So this Professor Shane Stadler found some new material exhibiting am magnetocaloric effect and applied for a patent seven years ago. This patent has not yet been granted, a surefire hint that there is a lot of legal work in the making which is hindering the claim to be granted...

    In f ...[text shortened]... s less of a problem.

    Oh and it might take still some years for an application in household...
    Any idea of the efficiency of magnetic cooling Vs Peltier cooling?

    There have been some good engineering work done on Peltier coolers and it has no moving parts other than a fan to get the heat out of a radiator and such. No freon, no moving parts, can last forever.

    But I don't know the efficiency compared to modern efficient freon refrigerators or the up and coming magnetic coolers.

    I think Einstein was the original inventor of magnetic cooling, he actually started a company that made them maybe 100 years ago or so.

    I take it back, it was a regular gas cycle:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Einstein_refrigerator

    Their actual patent:

    http://www.google.com/patents/US1781541
  4. SubscriberPonderable
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    16 Apr '15 12:23
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Any idea of the efficiency of magnetic cooling Vs Peltier cooling?

    There have been some good engineering work done on Peltier coolers and it has no moving parts other than a fan to get the heat out of a radiator and such. No freon, no moving parts, can last forever.

    But I don't know the efficiency compared to modern efficient freon refrigerators or t ...[text shortened]... rg/wiki/Einstein_refrigerator

    Their actual patent:

    http://www.google.com/patents/US1781541
    As with Peltier you have to transport away the heat using some heat carrier...so the overall efficiency is not soo different. But stacking magentocaloric slices is far easier. The moving part would be some kind of pump to move hot and cold heat carrier to and fro.
  5. Subscribersonhouse
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    16 Apr '15 13:45
    Originally posted by Ponderable
    As with Peltier you have to transport away the heat using some heat carrier...so the overall efficiency is not soo different. But stacking magentocaloric slices is far easier. The moving part would be some kind of pump to move hot and cold heat carrier to and fro.
    So you are saying with magnetocaloric cooling you could reach lower temps? I wonder how low you can go with that? My cryo equipment gets to 10 degrees Kelvin, it uses helium gas as the refrigerant.
  6. SubscriberPonderable
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    17 Apr '15 11:26
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    So you are saying with magnetocaloric cooling you could reach lower temps? I wonder how low you can go with that? My cryo equipment gets to 10 degrees Kelvin, it uses helium gas as the refrigerant.
    will I think about about a µK in fact, which is comparatively cold, though not record setting.
    But you are probably well aware that we do have difficulties in callibrating there...
  7. Subscribersonhouse
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    18 Apr '15 14:22
    Originally posted by Ponderable
    will I think about about a µK in fact, which is comparatively cold, though not record setting.
    But you are probably well aware that we do have difficulties in callibrating there...
    I think in the sub microK environment, they cool with lasers.
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    18 Apr '15 14:282 edits
  9. Subscribersonhouse
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    19 Apr '15 21:30
    Originally posted by MataRengi
    That's all you have to say?🙂
  10. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    20 Apr '15 04:02
    Originally posted by MataRengi
    Air Magnet?
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