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Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    10 Oct '14 09:53
    Has to be a slap in the face to Boko Haram, Taliban and Isis monsters. It tickles me pink she won!

    Although now those monstrous organizations might even be after her with more vigor. I hope not.
  2. 10 Oct '14 13:48
    Nice to see that the Nobel Peace Prize didn't go to murderers or (war) criminals for a change.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    10 Oct '14 14:12
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Nice to see that the Nobel Peace Prize didn't go to murderers or (war) criminals for a change.
    Are you referring to Nelson?
  4. 10 Oct '14 17:08
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Has to be a slap in the face to Boko Haram, Taliban and Isis monsters. It tickles me pink she won!

    Although now those monstrous organizations might even be after her with more vigor. I hope not.
    This has nothing to do with science.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    10 Oct '14 18:00
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    This has nothing to do with science.
    True. I put it here where folks would be more inclined to appreciate it.
  6. 11 Oct '14 16:38 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse to twhitehead
    True. I put it here where folks would be more inclined to appreciate it.
    Without looking it up, how many readers here could name the only other
    Pakistani to win a Nobel Prize (in science)? (I can, of course.)

    While he considered himself a Muslim, Pakistan's parliament approved a
    constitutional amendment that defined his Muslim sect as non-Islamic.
    That became one reason for him to leave Pakistan.
  7. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    12 Oct '14 11:03
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Without looking it up, how many readers here could name the only other
    Pakistani to win a Nobel Prize (in science)? (I can, of course.)

    While he considered himself a Muslim, Pakistan's parliament approved a
    constitutional amendment that defined his Muslim sect as non-Islamic.
    That became one reason for him to leave Pakistan.
    I remember that, 1979, the year my Kevin was born. Abdus Salam, didn't know his version of Isalm was banned.
  8. 12 Oct '14 23:33 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I remember that, 1979, the year my Kevin was born. Abdus Salam, didn't know his version of Isalm was banned.
    Abdus Salam was quite critical of science education in Pakistan's schools.

    At one time (I suspect there was an agreement between the governments
    of the USA and Pakistan), MIT offered to admit as a graduate student in
    physics any Pakistani who could pass (score at least 80% ) a special test of
    multiple-choice questions made by Chen-Ning Yang (who was one of the
    first Chinese scientists to win a Nobel Prize). (I know that American books
    like to deny that Lee and Yang were Chinese and insist they were exclusively
    American, but when they won the Nobel Prize in 1957, they were still citizens
    of China and would not even apply for US citizenship until several years later.)
    While Chen-Ning Yang had a reputation as a 'hard' professor of physics,
    he thought that a good MIT student with a B.S. in physics *should* be
    able to pass his test.

    The test was given to scores of Pakistanis, all of whom had undergraduate
    degrees in physics from universities in Pakistan. Most of them already had
    graduate degrees; some of them already were working on their Ph.Ds at
    universities in Pakistan. None of these Pakistanis came close to passing
    the test. Indeed, some Pakistanis scored about as badly as someone who
    had guessed every answer to the multiple-choice questions. Abdus Salam
    regarded these results as evidence of the generally poor quality of physics
    education in Pakistan's universities. Or was Yang's test simply 'too hard'?
  9. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    18 Oct '14 01:17
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Abdus Salam was quite critical of science education in Pakistan's schools.

    At one time (I suspect there was an agreement between the governments
    of the USA and Pakistan), MIT offered to admit as a graduate student in
    physics any Pakistani who could pass (score at least 80% ) a special test of
    multiple-choice questions made by Chen-Ning Yang (who was ...[text shortened]... quality of physics
    education in Pakistan's universities. Or was Yang's test simply 'too hard'?
    Did Salam take that test?
  10. 18 Oct '14 19:17 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Did Salam take that test?
    I suspect that Abdus Salam would have considered it beneath his dignity to
    take a test intended to select Pakistanis for graduate study in physics at MIT.
    I suspect that MIT advised Chen-Ning Yang to make the test difficult enough
    so that not many Pakistani applicants would be able to pass it, but having
    everyone fail it was presumably not what he or Abdus Salam had expected.