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  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    08 Aug '15 11:35 / 1 edit
    http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150808.html

    If that doesn't wet your whistle, I don't know what will

    Click on the image and you can get a greatly magnified view, especially of the foreground. Incredible image!
  2. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    09 Aug '15 03:45
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150808.html

    If that doesn't wet your whistle, I don't know what will

    Click on the image and you can get a greatly magnified view, especially of the foreground. Incredible image!
    Looks like a good place to set up a hotdog stand, like that guy in The Martian Chronicles.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Aug '15 12:27
    Originally posted by Soothfast
    Looks like a good place to set up a hotdog stand, like that guy in The Martian Chronicles.
    I keep looking for a fossil thigh bone but alas no joy so far
  4. 09 Aug '15 12:55
    It has a grandiose, harsh and hostile beauty that is captivating...

    For about five minutes, after which you start thinking, "I would like to go somewhere with trees,
    grass, birds, water, life..."

    I cannot imagine wanting to go to Mars to stay [as opposed to visiting] when it is so hostile
    and barren.

    It's one of the reasons I prefer built space habitats that are designed to be Earth-like and
    comfortable.

    Kinda like this... http://www.spacehabs.com/projects/#portfolio/20/

    But probably much larger, that's an 'early prototype' sized habitat.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Aug '15 14:00
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    It has a grandiose, harsh and hostile beauty that is captivating...

    For about five minutes, after which you start thinking, "I would like to go somewhere with trees,
    grass, birds, water, life..."

    I cannot imagine wanting to go to Mars to stay [as opposed to visiting] when it is so hostile
    and barren.

    It's one of the reasons I prefer built sp ...[text shortened]... /projects/#portfolio/20/

    But probably much larger, that's an 'early prototype' sized habitat.
    I don't think there will be above ground habitats on Mars till they work up some kind of planet wide magnetic field. I envision a superconducting cable going around the Martian equator with maybe 20,000 amps or so making a field capable of shielding most of the ions of the solar wind. If they do that, they can think about rebuilding an atmosphere and do a terraforming on Mars.
  6. 09 Aug '15 14:21
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I don't think there will be above ground habitats on Mars till they work up some kind of planet wide magnetic field. I envision a superconducting cable going around the Martian equator with maybe 20,000 amps or so making a field capable of shielding most of the ions of the solar wind. If they do that, they can think about rebuilding an atmosphere and do a terraforming on Mars.
    Not in this century, they don't.
  7. 09 Aug '15 14:56
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I don't think there will be above ground habitats on Mars till they work up some kind of planet wide magnetic field. I envision a superconducting cable going around the Martian equator with maybe 20,000 amps or so making a field capable of shielding most of the ions of the solar wind. If they do that, they can think about rebuilding an atmosphere and do a terraforming on Mars.
    Not having a magnetic field will certainly cause any atmosphere on Mars to get blown off
    at a much higher rate that of the Earth [for example].

    But it's still not overnight.

    I suspect it would be far simpler to just replace the atmosphere at the rate it's lost.

    However the difficulties in terraforming a planet, and the time needed to do so are some of
    the reasons I have for preferring habitats in space.
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Aug '15 15:36
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Not having a magnetic field will certainly cause any atmosphere on Mars to get blown off
    at a much higher rate that of the Earth [for example].

    But it's still not overnight.

    I suspect it would be far simpler to just replace the atmosphere at the rate it's lost.

    However the difficulties in terraforming a planet, and the time needed to do so are some of
    the reasons I have for preferring habitats in space.
    Not having a magnetic field limits habitats to underground or very well radiation shielded. It would also preclude having above ground agriculture assuming we have made an oxygen containing atmosphere.

    Eventually they will come to the conclusion a magnetic shield is vital to a placid planet.
  9. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    10 Aug '15 07:40
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150808.html

    If that doesn't wet your whistle, I don't know what will

    Click on the image and you can get a greatly magnified view, especially of the foreground. Incredible image!
    Some other captivating Mars Curiosity pictures:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/24/mars-rover-penis-draws-nasa_n_3148422.html

    https://www.rt.com/news/311451-mars-nasa-image-monster/