1. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
    Moves
    2120
    23 Jul '15 02:39
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3171346/Woman-jumped-New-York-rooftop-bar-wrote-harrowing-letter-friends-death-telling-pain-strict-Hasidic-Jewish-upbringing-struggled-life-quitting-faith.html

    "Woman who jumped from New York rooftop bar wrote harrowing letter
    to friends before death telling of pain at strict Hasidic Jewish upbringing
    and how struggled with life after quitting faith"

    Brought up as a Hasidic Jew in New York City, Faigy Mayer (age 30) committed suicide

    "If people were allowed to think, they would not be religious."
    --Faigy Mayer

    Here are some recent books by women who grew up as ultra-Orthodox Jews in New York City:

    _Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of My Hasidic Roots_
    by Deborah Feldman

    _Cut Me Loose: Sin and Salvation After My Ultra-Orthodox Girlhood_
    by Leah Vincent (nee Kaplan, who says she's a rabbi's daughter)
  2. Standard memberJerryH
    Hyperbole Happy
    Joined
    17 Jul '08
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    1740
    23 Jul '15 05:49
    I don't doubt that there are tragic ends. I do doubt that they are easily explained. Did this poor woman die because of a strict Hasidic Jewish upbringing? Did she die because of the loss of community that resulted with the rejection of her faith? Did she die because she had poor coping skills and couldn't find new community?

    Did nature err in the creation of a mind that must reconcile the need to survive, nature's highest imperative, with the now clear, impossibility of survival? Is religion a step in our cultural evolution or are religion's roots older than man? Could it be an inheritance along with fire and part of our being even before our being?

    For those, how many, that suffer in religion there are also many that find comfort and even joy. If you could take religion from all would you? Would humanity be better off? Religion is so universal, does this hint at some necessity?
  3. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
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    2120
    24 Jul '15 00:261 edit
    Originally posted by JerryH
    I don't doubt that there are tragic ends. I do doubt that they are easily explained. Did this poor woman die because of a strict Hasidic Jewish upbringing? Did she die because of the loss of community that resulted with the rejection of her faith? Did she die because she had poor coping skills and couldn't find new community?

    Did nature err in the creatio ...[text shortened]... d you? Would humanity be better off? Religion is so universal, does this hint at some necessity?
    I believe it's clear enough that religion did not help Faigy Mayer have a happy life.
    Before her death, Faigy Mayer wrote and said (she appeared in 2012 documentary
    by 'National Geographic' ) quite a bit about her life. It's evident that she was deeply unhappy
    growing up with the expectations and restrictions placed upon Hasidic Jewish girls.
    After leaving the Hasidic community, she understandably struggled greatly in adjusting
    to the radically new ways of living and thinking in the more secular modern world.

    Her most immediate problem seems to have been her living situation. She urgently
    needed to find a new place to live. She kept asking her friend, Yangbo Du, if she
    could live (platonically with him) at his place and if he could help her find a job.
    He believed there was not enough room for her to stay permanently, but he was willing
    to allow her to stay temporarily. It seems to me that if Faigy Mayer had been able to
    get just a little more help, such as a job offer or a new place to live, in time, then she would
    not have taken her own life. The margin between life and death can be small indeed.