1. Joined
    24 Apr '05
    Moves
    3061
    17 Sep '06 07:51
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20060914/ts_csm/cbuddha

    The word is that Buddhism is on the rise in America. My hope would be that more are introduced to Dharma practice -- not necessarily to "Buddhism" as a set of beliefs. This article seems to suggest that the movement of Buddhism in America is largely oriented toward meditative practices.
  2. Joined
    28 Aug '05
    Moves
    1355
    17 Sep '06 14:45
    Originally posted by LemonJello
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20060914/ts_csm/cbuddha

    The word is that Buddhism is on the rise in America. My hope would be that more are introduced to Dharma practice -- not necessarily to "Buddhism" as a set of beliefs. This article seems to suggest that the movement of Buddhism in America is largely oriented toward meditative practices.
    Its a 'Westernised' Buddhism with all the connatations that 'Westernism' evokes, ie self advantage, mysticim of the orient, joining the latest trend/fad, occidental appropriation of the orient, essentialising the orient etc etc.
  3. Joined
    04 Apr '06
    Moves
    2969
    17 Sep '06 14:532 edits
    there's a contradiction in terms to start with between America and Budhism

    Budhism is getting read of everything to focus on your spirituality, while the American way is to waste all your life making money and not caring about spirituality (except praying god for money - eh eh)
  4. Donationrwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    Royal Oak, MI
    Joined
    09 Sep '01
    Moves
    26187
    17 Sep '06 15:12
    Originally posted by LemonJello
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20060914/ts_csm/cbuddha

    The word is that Buddhism is on the rise in America. My hope would be that more are introduced to Dharma practice -- not necessarily to "Buddhism" as a set of beliefs. This article seems to suggest that the movement of Buddhism in America is largely oriented toward meditative practices.
    Evangelical Buddhism?
  5. Standard memberNemesio
    Ursulakantor
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Joined
    05 Mar '02
    Moves
    32455
    17 Sep '06 18:55
    Originally posted by rwingett
    Evangelical Buddhism?
    It's true!

    Just the other day, a bunch of extremist Buddhists chased me into
    a dead-end alley, held knives to my throat, stuffed curry in my mouth
    and made me swear an oath on the demiurge that I will make my
    inner Buddha see the light of Nirvana!

    I swear!
  6. Joined
    24 Apr '05
    Moves
    3061
    17 Sep '06 19:25
    Originally posted by Vladamir no1
    Its a 'Westernised' Buddhism with all the connatations that 'Westernism' evokes, ie self advantage, mysticim of the orient, joining the latest trend/fad, occidental appropriation of the orient, essentialising the orient etc etc.
    There's some truth to that, probably. But maybe not as much as you would think.
  7. Joined
    24 Apr '05
    Moves
    3061
    17 Sep '06 19:27
    Originally posted by Jee
    there's a contradiction in terms to start with between America and Budhism

    Budhism is getting read of everything to focus on your spirituality, while the American way is to waste all your life making money and not caring about spirituality (except praying god for money - eh eh)
    I hate to break it to you, but by your characterization of "American", I know a lot of Americans who aren't "American".
  8. Joined
    24 Apr '05
    Moves
    3061
    17 Sep '06 19:29
    Originally posted by rwingett
    Evangelical Buddhism?
    Jesus, I hope not.
  9. Joined
    24 Apr '05
    Moves
    3061
    17 Sep '06 19:30
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    It's true!

    Just the other day, a bunch of extremist Buddhists chased me into
    a dead-end alley, held knives to my throat, stuffed curry in my mouth
    and made me swear an oath on the demiurge that I will make my
    inner Buddha see the light of Nirvana!

    I swear!
    And...you sort of enjoyed it, right? Especially the curry?
  10. Joined
    01 Dec '04
    Moves
    4640
    18 Sep '06 04:49
    Originally posted by LemonJello
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20060914/ts_csm/cbuddha

    The word is that Buddhism is on the rise in America. My hope would be that more are introduced to Dharma practice -- not necessarily to "Buddhism" as a set of beliefs. This article seems to suggest that the movement of Buddhism in America is largely oriented toward meditative practices.
    LJ, if "practice" was abandoned within Buddhism, then it would be a false Buddhism, because Buddha's Forth Noble Truth specifies the need to use the Noble Eightfold Path, a large part of which is practice.

    There are two main pillars to Buddhism --

    1. The individual, separate self is not real

    2. The way out of suffering is by letting go of attachments

    North American culture is geared to the opposite of that, in a sense -- that is, the "self" is glorified, and as a result, attachment is as well (via the entertainment industry, which exhalts the notion of romantic love and the perfect soul-mate).

    Because Buddhism at its core is very diametrically opposed to certain North American values, it becomes automatically attractive (opposites attract, generally), and potentially valuable as well, given that many of these Western values are ego-based.
  11. Joined
    04 Apr '06
    Moves
    2969
    18 Sep '06 11:27
    Originally posted by LemonJello
    I hate to break it to you, but by your characterization of "American", I know a lot of Americans who aren't "American".
    I hope so 😉

    I know so 😛

    And I have met some weird buddhist too 😵

    In Lao, people usually become for 4 years monks and then go back to work - no matter their age. It's like going to the army I guess. And the one who does that are very respected then.

    Maybe it's something that caould be brought to Occident.

    It was funny to talk to that monk over there and once and then glancing at his photo of him dressed as a builder - job that he will get back after his time as a monk.

    It just change everything to choose to do that for a certain time and still be accepted by the society as normal.

    We can all benefit from a lil spiritual break, don't we?
  12. Standard memberdj2becker
    Tiger's ghost
    Shetland cemetery
    Joined
    01 Oct '04
    Moves
    11829
    18 Sep '06 12:13
    Originally posted by Jee
    there's a contradiction in terms to start with between America and Budhism

    Budhism is getting read of everything to focus on your spirituality, while the American way is to waste all your life making money and not caring about spirituality (except praying god for money - eh eh)
    I thought you discarded logic? 😉
  13. Joined
    04 Apr '06
    Moves
    2969
    18 Sep '06 12:50
    Originally posted by dj2becker
    I thought you discarded logic? 😉
    that's because you dont read the answers to your own posts.

    Originally posted by Jee
    I aint discarding logic for myself. I just find it - after using it - not strong enough, not deep enough.

    So I have logic + feeling as tools, you only got logic.


    I am amazed how people that can't read can actually write.
    I thought that was logically impossible.

    Oh well...
  14. Hmmm . . .
    Joined
    19 Jan '04
    Moves
    22131
    19 Sep '06 01:59
    Originally posted by Metamorphosis
    LJ, if "practice" was abandoned within Buddhism, then it would be a false Buddhism, because Buddha's Forth Noble Truth specifies the need to use the Noble Eightfold Path, a large part of which is practice.

    There are two main pillars to Buddhism --

    1. The individual, separate self is not real

    2. The way out of suffering is by letting go of atta ...[text shortened]... ), and potentially valuable as well, given that many of these Western values are ego-based.
    There are two main pillars to Buddhism --

    1. The individual, separate self is not real

    2. The way out of suffering is by letting go of attachments


    Can this be the shortest “sutra” ever? All the rest is commentary (or, better, practice...). (gassho)

    _________________

    Commentary:

    If you realize 1., it will facilitate (not likely to remove the necessity for) the rest of the letting-go practice—after all, who do you now think is hanging on to those other attachments?

    If you realize 2. and follow it, sooner or later your letting-go practice will lead you to the I-construct attachment, and letting go of that.
Back to Top