1. Joined
    31 May '06
    Moves
    1795
    26 Aug '15 15:22
    I once [possibly more than once, I forget] gave an example of the differences in the
    way we perceive things and how we cannot just assume that other people think like
    we do.

    The example was of a long-standing debate in philosophy between those who argued
    that when people say that they are 'picturing something in their minds eye' they are
    not really 'seeing' what they are imagining, but are instead just recalling facts about
    the thing they are picturing, and those whom argued that people were in fact seeing
    things in their mind just like you see things with your eyes.
    The person from who I heard about this went on to say that what they found out was that
    people lie along a spectrum with those at one end unable to produce mental images and
    those at the other able to see things as clearly as if they were looking at them.
    And that those debating this issue were at one end or the other and simply assumed that
    the way they saw the world was the same as everyone else.


    When I gave this example some people asked for more information on this topic out of
    interest... However in the ebb and flow of forum life I never got around to it and forgot.

    However I just came across this current BBC article that talks about this exact effect
    [although not the philosophy part, just talking about the condition's] and thought that
    those that asked last time might be interested.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-34039054
  2. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    26 Aug '15 16:18
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    I once [possibly more than once, I forget] gave an example of the differences in the
    way we perceive things and how we cannot just assume that other people think like
    we do.

    The example was of a long-standing debate in philosophy between those who argued
    that when people say that they are 'picturing something in their minds eye' they are
    not r ...[text shortened]... t
    those that asked last time might be interested.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-34039054
    I took the test and came out as about average, but I know sometimes I have lucid dreams where I can count feathers on a bird for instance. I had a dream the other night where I was chasing an eagle and it escaped into a hole in a hillside, kind of like a ground hog burrow, but then when I got closer it backed out and started walking towards me and it seemed like I was child size and the eagle was the same size as me, like I say, I could see the annoyed expression on its face and see the feathers and colors really clearly.
  3. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
    A Spirited Misfit
    in London
    Joined
    14 Mar '15
    Moves
    8554
    26 Aug '15 18:17
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    I once [possibly more than once, I forget] gave an example of the differences in the
    way we perceive things and how we cannot just assume that other people think like
    we do.

    The example was of a long-standing debate in philosophy between those who argued
    that when people say that they are 'picturing something in their minds eye' they are
    not r ...[text shortened]... t
    those that asked last time might be interested.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-34039054
    Saw that news report this morning. Very interesting. (Especially the chap who has never been able to create images in his head).

    To digress slightly, and following on from what Sonhouse said about dreams; the holy grail of dreaming is to have awareness while having a dream, that you are in fact dreaming. (Very rarely happens). If you know you are dreaming, and have 'control' of your dream, anything is possible. (Only once in my life had such an 'awareness dream' and flew over fields and oceans).
  4. Standard memberwolfgang59
    Infidel
    Dunedin
    Joined
    09 Jun '07
    Moves
    45641
    26 Aug '15 19:40
    Originally posted by Ghost of a Duke
    Saw that news report this morning. Very interesting. (Especially the chap who has never been able to create images in his head).

    To digress slightly, and following on from what Sonhouse said about dreams; the holy grail of dreaming is to have awareness while having a dream, that you are in fact dreaming. (Very rarely happens). If you know you are ...[text shortened]... possible. (Only once in my life had such an 'awareness dream' and flew over fields and oceans).
    I have a lucid dream about once a week but the frequency is random.
    Apparently there are various things you can do to train for lucid dreaming
    including drugs (legal ones) and setting your alarm for silly o'clock.
  5. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
    A Spirited Misfit
    in London
    Joined
    14 Mar '15
    Moves
    8554
    26 Aug '15 20:22
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    I have a lucid dream about once a week but the frequency is random.
    Apparently there are various things you can do to train for lucid dreaming
    including drugs (legal ones) and setting your alarm for silly o'clock.
    Thanks for the tip, though am a little concerned if i set my alarm for silly o'clock i'll wake up believing in Creationism.
  6. Subscribermoonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    Joined
    31 May '12
    Moves
    1982
    26 Aug '15 21:10
    Some people are more visually-oriented than others, whilst others are more audio-oriented or verbal-descriptive-oriented. Mozart could write down the notes of piece of music he had heard only once; good example of an audio-oriented mind. Other people can recall verbatim what someone said; such people were charged to deliver messages in ancient times. It is also not uncommon for Muslims to commit the entire Koran to memory.
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