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    08 May '06 18:261 edit
    Originally posted by Palynka
    I have some questions:
    Isn't happiness intertwined with notions of fulfillment?
    Can fulfillment be truly achieved without happiness? And if not, isn't then happiness that should be seeked?
    (a) Broadly, yes, but I guess it's possible to feel happy without having fulfilled yourself (drink, drugs, etc.)
    (b) Even if true, that wouldn't follow; happiness would be only one (albeit necessary) condition of "complete" fulfillment, and not necessarily the most important one. But I'm not sure it is true.

    I guess if you define "happy" in a more "Greek" way, that changes things...
  2. Standard memberPalynka
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    08 May '06 18:36
    Originally posted by dottewell
    (a) Broadly, yes, but I guess it's possible to feel happy without having fulfilled yourself (drink, drugs, etc.)
    (b) Even if true, that wouldn't follow; happiness would be only one (albeit necessary) condition of "complete" fulfillment, and not necessarily the most important one. But I'm not sure it is true.

    I guess if you define "happy" in a more "Greek" way, that changes things...
    I think I disagree (I'm not sure).

    Fulfillment is as objective as happiness. While someone may feel fulfilled living in a small cabin and never contributing anything for society, others would be fulfilled by having an active role either in art, politics, their career, material objectives alongside any personal desires that bring him happiness (kids, love, etc).

    Would the cabin example fill a Greek concept of eudaimonia?
  3. Joined
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    08 May '06 18:39
    Originally posted by Palynka
    I think I disagree (I'm not sure).

    Fulfillment is as objective as happiness. While someone may feel fulfilled living in a small cabin and never contributing anything for society, others would be fulfilled by having an active role either in art, politics, their career, material objectives alongside any personal desires that bring him happiness (kids, love, etc).

    Would the cabin example fill a Greek concept of eudaimonia?
    I meant "fulfilled" not only in the sense of feeling fulfilled but actually having fulfilled your potential in different areas of your life.
  4. Standard memberPalynka
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    08 May '06 18:47
    Originally posted by dottewell
    I meant "fulfilled" not only in the sense of feeling fulfilled but actually having fulfilled your potential in different areas of your life.
    Then I definitely disagree, but thanks for the info.
  5. Joined
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    08 May '06 18:502 edits
    Originally posted by Palynka
    Then I definitely disagree, but thanks for the info.
    Fair enough, as long as you are aware I'm not thinking about "career development" but rather developing your human qualities. Success in certain careers might in fact be detrimental to that.
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