1. Donationbuckky
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    10 Mar '11 02:56
    Smudge my forehead please. I forgot what it means ? Someone set me straight.
  2. St. Peter's
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    10 Mar '11 14:04
    Originally posted by buckky
    Smudge my forehead please. I forgot what it means ? Someone set me straight.
    Traditionally, the ashes for the Ash Wednesday service come from burning the palm fronds from the previous year’s Palm Sunday celebration. Ashes are a sign of remorse, repentance, and mourning. Today someone might wear a black armband to signify that they are in mourning;way back when people put ashes on their foreheads.

    hope this helps
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    10 Mar '11 14:08
    Originally posted by Doward
    Traditionally, the ashes for the Ash Wednesday service come from burning the palm fronds from the previous year’s Palm Sunday celebration. Ashes are a sign of remorse, repentance, and mourning. Today someone might wear a black armband to signify that they are in mourning;way back when people put ashes on their foreheads.

    hope this helps
    Some people still put a little ash mark on the forehead where i live.
  4. St. Peter's
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    10 Mar '11 14:33
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Some people still put a little ash mark on the forehead where i live.
    we do as well. It is not pagan in origin, so JW's could participate if they were so inclined.
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    10 Mar '11 14:401 edit
    Originally posted by Doward
    we do as well. It is not pagan in origin, so JW's could participate if they were so inclined.
    No, because it would identify us as participants of another religion. Here it is exclusively a Catholic practice. Its not so much the observation itself, its how it may be perceived by others, both Jws and non Jws. Repentance of course is paramount, although it must be accompanied by 'works befitting repentance', not merely by an outward sign or symbol. It was really funny, my nieces who attend Holy Family School (exclusively Catholic school) were asked what they were giving up, one said school and the other was going to give up homework for lent! 🙂
  6. St. Peter's
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    10 Mar '11 15:34
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    No, because it would identify us as participants of another religion. Here it is exclusively a Catholic practice. Its not so much the observation itself, its how it may be perceived by others, both Jws and non Jws. Repentance of course is paramount, although it must be accompanied by 'works befitting repentance', not merely by an outward sign or sy ...[text shortened]... they were giving up, one said school and the other was going to give up homework for lent! 🙂
    so then in would be okay for a JW to practice it in the US since it is not a strictly catholic observance, but protestant as well? Providing of course the proper "repentant" acts were followed?


    I agree the idea of giving stuff up has become somewhat silly. I think this time should be for Christians to do some deep self reflection and instead of giving up chocolate or caffiene (or some other nonsense), they should consider giving up some sin that they have been holding on to.
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    10 Mar '11 15:47
    Originally posted by Doward
    so then in would be okay for a JW to practice it in the US since it is not a strictly catholic observance, but protestant as well? Providing of course the proper "repentant" acts were followed?


    I agree the idea of giving stuff up has become somewhat silly. I think this time should be for Christians to do some deep self reflection and instead of giving up ...[text shortened]... me other nonsense), they should consider giving up some sin that they have been holding on to.
    Its pretty doubtful I think, as there is no real Biblical ordinance given to celebrate either the festival of lent nor of putting a sign of repentance on ones forehead.
  8. St. Peter's
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    10 Mar '11 16:04
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Its pretty doubtful I think, as there is no real Biblical ordinance given to celebrate either the festival of lent nor of putting a sign of repentance on ones forehead.
    The Jews always mourned with sakcloth and ashes. For thousands of years Jews have placed ashes on their heads a sign of repentance and mourning. The evidence is overwhelming on this. As far there not being a"festival" or whatever biblicaly ordinated, there is very little in the epistles that tell us what we should and should not observe. I think it might be splitting hairs. There is a solid biblical foundation for this behavior and no real reason why a Christian shouldn't participate, unless of course they are not interested. Only the love feast is mandated (by Christ himself).
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    10 Mar '11 17:21
    Originally posted by Doward
    The Jews always mourned with sakcloth and ashes. For thousands of years Jews have placed ashes on their heads a sign of repentance and mourning. The evidence is overwhelming on this. As far there not being a"festival" or whatever biblicaly ordinated, there is very little in the epistles that tell us what we should and should not observe. I think it might be s ...[text shortened]... nless of course they are not interested. Only the love feast is mandated (by Christ himself).
    I do not dispute that the Jews did it, they also tore their garments apart as well or put on sack cloth in some instances, we are not Jews, we are Christians, our repentance is from the heart, not from an outward display, but an inward one. The only observation Christ refers to is a celebration not of his resurrection, but of his sacrificial death. There is no ordinance in scripture to observe any other festival or custom. This is not splitting hairs, its a statement of fact.

    (Luke 22:19-20) 19 Also, he took a loaf, gave thanks, broke it, and gave it to them, saying: “This means my body which is to be given in your behalf. Keep doing this in remembrance of me.”  Also, the cup in the same way after they had the evening meal, he saying: “This cup means the new covenant by virtue of my blood, which is to be poured out in your behalf.

    As far as i am aware the practice of observing lent was not observed until the fourth century and may have pagan origins, one need only do a little research to find out.
  10. St. Peter's
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    10 Mar '11 18:34
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    I do not dispute that the Jews did it, they also tore their garments apart as well or put on sack cloth in some instances, we are not Jews, we are Christians, our repentance is from the heart, not from an outward display, but an inward one. The only observation Christ refers to is a celebration not of his resurrection, but of his sacrificial death. ...[text shortened]... l the fourth century and may have pagan origins, one need only do a little research to find out.
    I don't think ones salvation hinges on practicing or not practicing it. It's simply about spiritual growth. To each his own.
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