1. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
    A Spirited Misfit
    in London
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    09 Apr '15 18:46
    Or 'Chuggers.' The bane of my existence.

    They operate in packs on my local High Street, so if i manage to get past one with a polite 'no thank you' i am immediately confronted by a second (and sometimes a third). - Worst still, due to the nature of my job, i have to walk past them a number of times in a given day and each time have to deal with their attempts to stop me walking past. (And get my bank details).

    Don't get me wrong, i have nothing against giving to charity, but when i decide to do so i give direct to the charity concerned. But these guys are not volunteers, collecting out of the goodness of their hearts. They are paid a salary, and who pays that salary, the people they stop on the High Street and who sign up to have money come out of their account each month. (It is many many months before the charity itself benefits from the donations).
  2. Joined
    16 Feb '08
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    86381
    09 Apr '15 19:113 edits
    Originally posted by Ghost of a Duke
    Or 'Chuggers.' The bane of my existence.

    They operate in packs on my local High Street, so if i manage to get past one with a polite 'no thank you' i am immediately confronted by a second (and sometimes a third). - Worst still, due to the nature of my job, i have to walk past them a number of times in a given day and each time have to deal with th ...[text shortened]... ount each month. (It is many many months before the charity itself benefits from the donations).
    I'm with you, I hate these guys. They literally bounce into your path with a contrived "hi how's your day - I'm just asking folk how much they consider how well off they are?". I seriously contemplate punching these duchebags in the face.

    Edit: I give to charity in my own way through the channel I decide to give through.
  3. Joined
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    93485
    09 Apr '15 19:32
    Originally posted by Ghost of a Duke
    Or 'Chuggers.' The bane of my existence.

    They operate in packs on my local High Street, so if i manage to get past one with a polite 'no thank you' i am immediately confronted by a second (and sometimes a third). - Worst still, due to the nature of my job, i have to walk past them a number of times in a given day and each time have to deal with th ...[text shortened]... ount each month. (It is many many months before the charity itself benefits from the donations).
    although they are a pain, they fall into insignificance before the eternal irritation caused by the 'door knockers'....especially the ones who really want you to set up a direct debit...grrrrrr. during my days as a house husband it seemed like the second i got the baby to sleep, some pseudo-charity worker would spring out of the ether and start braying on my door.
  4. SubscriberSuzianne
    Misfit Queen
    Isle of Misfit Toys
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    09 Apr '15 20:48
    This must be mainly a British style of thing.

    We don't have these types in America, at least not shilling for charities. Mainly people asking for money here are homeless and asking for the money for themselves. Sometimes you see people soliciting donations for various causes, like maybe at the airport, but the typical American never sees these people in the normal course of their day.

    I give to charities at work through payroll deduction, so if someone approached me on the street asking for bank details, I'd politely (or maybe not so) tell them to shove off and if they insisted on impeding me or perhaps actually touching me, I'd have to hurt them until they stopped doing so.
  5. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
    A Spirited Misfit
    in London
    Joined
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    8554
    10 Apr '15 18:11
    They seem to be getting more prolific in the uk, so surprised to hear it's not a problem you've come across in the states. (Perhaps it's because here people are likely to be armed with nothing more deadly than a sturdy umbrella or cucumber sandwich).
    A few days ago they even accosted me while i was sitting at the bus stop. (A captive audience). At least, when i'm on the move and have momentum on my side, i have a chance of escape.
  6. Joined
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    10 Apr '15 21:10
    Originally posted by Ghost of a Duke
    They seem to be getting more prolific in the uk, so surprised to hear it's not a problem you've come across in the states. (Perhaps it's because here people are likely to be armed with nothing more deadly than a sturdy umbrella or cucumber sandwich).
    A few days ago they even accosted me while i was sitting at the bus stop. (A captive audience). At least, when i'm on the move and have momentum on my side, i have a chance of escape.
    My friend and I were approached leaving a Pub,we had leaflets thrust at us, he took one and ate it, he said it was very nice and could he have another? They left quickly! 🙂
  7. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
    A Spirited Misfit
    in London
    Joined
    14 Mar '15
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    8554
    11 Apr '15 17:14
    Originally posted by OdBod
    My friend and I were approached leaving a Pub,we had leaflets thrust at us, he took one and ate it, he said it was very nice and could he have another? They left quickly! 🙂
    🙂

    I like his style.
  8. Standard memberRJHinds
    The Near Genius
    Fort Gordon
    Joined
    24 Jan '11
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    12695
    11 Apr '15 23:56
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    This must be mainly a British style of thing.

    We don't have these types in America, at least not shilling for charities. Mainly people asking for money here are homeless and asking for the money for themselves. Sometimes you see people soliciting donations for various causes, like maybe at the airport, but the typical American never sees these people in ...[text shortened]... impeding me or perhaps actually touching me, I'd have to hurt them until they stopped doing so.
    You sound like a tough lady.
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