1. Joined
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    13 Jan '06 15:57
    I started a thread about Zarathustra, and then began reading "Thus spake Zarathustra" by Nietzsche. Well, the discussion on Zarathustra seem to drift (ever so lightly) into a discussion on Nietzsche. Now, I'm one of those who would really like to discuss Nietzsche, so I thought a thread of its own was wortwhile.

    It has already been argued that Nietzsche's Zarathustra is not necessarily the same character as the historic person Zarathustra, although both NZ and Z seem to share ideas and values. I believe that NZ is a way for N to express his own beliefs and values, and that he may have chosen Zarathustra for his main character in the book, because there are similarities between them.

    'Central to Nietzsche's philosophy is the idea of "life-affirmation," which involves an honest questioning of all doctrines which drain life's energies, however socially prevalent those views might be.'

    taken from http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/nietzsche/

    Please feel free to discuss Nietzsche here. I, for one, would be most interested in reading whatever you have to say on the subject. 🙂
  2. Standard membertelerion
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    13 Jan '06 17:04
    Originally posted by stocken
    I started a thread about Zarathustra, and then began reading "Thus spake Zarathustra" by Nietzsche. Well, the discussion on Zarathustra seem to drift (ever so lightly) into a discussion on Nietzsche. Now, I'm one of those who would really like to discuss Nietzsche, so I thought a thread of its own was wortwhile.

    It has already been argued that Nietzsche's ...[text shortened]... r one, would be most interested in reading whatever you have to say on the subject. 🙂
    I've read the first two books of "Thus Spake Zarathustra." I managed to get some things out of it, but to be honest found most of it confusing as hell. FN was a genius with words, and without a broader background in his work (I've only read The Geneaology of Morals besides) I'm afraid most of the gems were buried too deeply for me to grasp them.

    Maybe I can convince my wife to post on here about it. She took a graduate class that studied pessimism in continental philosophy. They read a quite a few of his works. She might have some interesting things to add.
  3. Forgotten
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    13 Jan '06 17:40
    yes,one of the greatest linebackers in pro football history.
    Only his name is Ray not Friedrich and its spelled NITSCHKE .
  4. Joined
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    13 Jan '06 17:45
    Originally posted by telerion
    I've read the first two books of "Thus Spake Zarathustra." I managed to get some things out of it, but to be honest found most of it confusing as hell. FN was a genius with words, and without a broader background in his work (I've only read The Geneaology of Morals besides) I'm afraid most of the gems were buried too deeply for me to grasp them.

    May ...[text shortened]... phy. They read a quite a few of his works. She might have some interesting things to add.
    I would read anything about Nietzsche in this thread with great interest. I'll try and participate with what little understanding I have of Nietzsche through reading "Thus spake Zarathustra".

    I have put these works on my list of must-read: Daybreak, Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, Twilight of the Idols, The Antichrist and Ecce Homo. So, I have a lot of reading and studying to do this year. 🙂

    It's fun.
  5. Forgotten
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    14 Jan '06 00:15
    Originally posted by stocken
    Ecce Homo..
    Yes , gays kinda creep me out too,but to say they are ecce
    isnt politically correct.
  6. Hmmm . . .
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    14 Jan '06 01:53
    Originally posted by telerion
    I've read the first two books of "Thus Spake Zarathustra." I managed to get some things out of it, but to be honest found most of it confusing as hell. FN was a genius with words, and without a broader background in his work (I've only read The Geneaology of Morals besides) I'm afraid most of the gems were buried too deeply for me to grasp them.

    May ...[text shortened]... phy. They read a quite a few of his works. She might have some interesting things to add.
    I've read the first two books of "Thus Spake Zarathustra." I managed to get some things out of it, but to be honest found most of it confusing as hell.

    As I noted to stock in the other thread, the first time I tried to read Thus Spoke Zarathustra, I naively expected this aphoristic string of wisdom-teachings, ala Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet. I just got lost real quick. Then I read Beyond Good and Evil, and that helped some. But I would really recommend reading Kathleen Higgins’ Nietzsche’s Zarathustra to get a feel for the narrative text; she points out where Z makes mistakes and misjudgments along the way on his own journey. . I haven’t started Z since reading her, but I think I can now.
  7. Standard membertelerion
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    14 Jan '06 03:00
    Originally posted by vistesd
    [b]I've read the first two books of "Thus Spake Zarathustra." I managed to get some things out of it, but to be honest found most of it confusing as hell.

    As I noted to stock in the other thread, the first time I tried to read Thus Spoke Zarathustra, I naively expected this aphoristic string of wisdom-teachings, ala Kahlil Gibran’s [i]The Proph ...[text shortened]... the way on his own journey. . I haven’t started Z since reading her, but I think I can now.[/b]
    Thank you. I will definitely do that before I attempt "Thus Spake Zarathustra" again.
  8. Forgotten
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    14 Jan '06 07:14
    "That which does not kill us,makes us stonger."
    Friedrich Nietzsche
  9. Standard memberevertpot
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    14 Jan '06 12:30
    Nietzsche is without doubt the most important writer for the past 2500 years, but he is definitely not for everyone. Nietzsche should be read like the bible, you can open it on any page and get something out of it. Not meant to be read in a linear way from chapter a to z. Be playfull with it.

    Evert
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    14 Jan '06 20:09
    Originally posted by evertpot
    Nietzsche is without doubt the most important writer for the past 2500 years, but he is definitely not for everyone. Nietzsche should be read like the bible, you can open it on any page and get something out of it. Not meant to be read in a linear way from chapter a to z. Be playfull with it.

    Evert
    Get something out of the pages of the bible? I prefer Andrex myself...
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    14 Jan '06 20:293 edits
    And him that ye teach not to fly, I bid you teach him to fall the quicker! Thus spoke Zathustra ...does anyone know what page number this is on??
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    14 Jan '06 23:10
    Originally posted by Vladamir no1
    And him that ye teach not to fly, I bid you teach him to fall the quicker! Thus spoke Zathustra ...does anyone know what page number this is on??
    While we're on this subject, lets make it more generic...is there a site that enables you to find the page for specofic quotes within a book, abit like you can search for a certain word in a word document...
  13. Hmmm . . .
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    15 Jan '06 00:58
    Originally posted by Vladamir no1
    And him that ye teach not to fly, I bid you teach him to fall the quicker! Thus spoke Zathustra ...does anyone know what page number this is on??
    It's on page 209 of my Walter Kaufmann translation, in paragraph 20 of the section entitled "On Old and New Tablets."

    I'm still looking for a searcheable version of Nietzsch'es works. If you find one, let me know.
  14. Hmmm . . .
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    15 Jan '06 03:02
    I have decided to re-read Higgins’ book. Then, I will either tackle Z directly or read Daybreak first. Higgins suggests that The Birth of Tragedy (because TSZ is presented as a kind of tragedy) and Daybreak are both important for understanding TSZ.
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    15 Jan '06 16:321 edit
    Originally posted by vistesd
    It's on page 209 of my Walter Kaufmann translation, in paragraph 20 of the section entitled "On Old and New Tablets."

    I'm still looking for a searcheable version of Nietzsch'es works. If you find one, let me know.
    In my version (Oh how I wish I could read German) I have a heading of 'of old and new law tables' so i shall check there...n yes its there cheers
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