1. Joined
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    01 Mar '09 07:35
    Can anyone explain why the most hated of Jesus disciples, ended up
    either carrying the name of the Jewish religion, or gave name to the it?

    Which is it, and why?
  2. Germany
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    01 Mar '09 10:21
    I think the name is derived from the name of the country the jews lived in, Judea. But I'm by no means an expert on this matter, so this may be nonsense.
  3. Standard memberScriabin
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    01 Mar '09 21:10
    Originally posted by Jigtie
    Can anyone explain why the most hated of Jesus disciples, ended up
    either carrying the name of the Jewish religion, or gave name to the it?

    Which is it, and why?
    not much trouble to look it up. why did you assume a relationship between the Jewish religion and the name Judas?

    Judas is a variant of the Latin Jude \j(u)-de\, which is a variant of Judah.

    Jude, a brother of James, wrote one of the shortest books in the Bible, the Book of Jude.
    Thomas Hardy wrote a novel named "Jude the Obscure".

    Jude has 6 variant forms: Jud, Judah, Judas, Judd, Judsen and Judson.
  4. Joined
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    02 Mar '09 05:43
    Originally posted by Scriabin
    ...why did you assume a relationship between the Jewish religion and the name Judas?...
    Judas - Judaism

    Seems they've both sprung from Judah. So, why call a religion presumably
    started by Abraham, Judaism? Shouldn't it be: Abrahimism?
  5. Joined
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    02 Mar '09 14:11
    Originally posted by Jigtie
    [b]Judas - Judaism

    Seems they've both sprung from Judah. So, why call a religion presumably
    started by Abraham, Judaism? Shouldn't it be: Abrahimism?[/b]
    Things aren't always what they seem.

    The term Judaism wasn't derived from the name Judas despite their similarities.
  6. Standard memberScriabin
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    02 Mar '09 16:372 edits
    The short answer is that the word Judaism is a mistake in the same sense that the word "Indian" to describe Native Americans is a mistake. But it is a mistake we all have come to accept in common usage. The rabbis explain:

    The original name for the people we now call Jews was Hebrews. The word "Hebrew" [in Hebrew, "Ivri" ] is first used in the Torah to describe Abraham (Gen. 14:13). The word is apparently derived from the name Eber, one of Abraham's ancestors. Another tradition teaches that the word comes from the word "eyver," which means "the other side," referring to the fact that Abraham came from the other side of the Euphrates, or referring to the fact Abraham was separated from the other nations morally and spiritually.

    Another name used for the people is Children of Israel or Israelites, which refers to the fact that the people are descendants of Jacob, who was also called Israel.
    [in Hebrew, "Yehudi"] is derived from the name Judah, which was the name of one of Jacob's twelve sons. Judah was the ancestor of one of the tribes of Israel, which was named after him. Likewise, the word Judaism literally means "Judah-ism," that is, the religion of the Yehudim. Other sources, however, say that the word "Yehudim" means "People of G-d," because the first three letters of "Yehudah" are the same as the first three letters of G-d's four-letter name.

    Originally, the term Yehudi referred specifically to members of the tribe of Judah, as distinguished from the other tribes of Israel. However, after the death of King Solomon, the nation of Israel was split into two kingdoms: the kingdom of Judah and the kingdom of Israel (I Kings 12; II Chronicles 10). After that time, the word Yehudi could properly be used to describe anyone from the kingdom of Judah, which included the tribes of Judah, Benjamin and Levi, as well as scattered settlements from other tribes. The most obvious biblical example of this usage is in Esther 2:5, where Mordecai is referred to as both a Yehudi and a member of the tribe of Benjamin.

    In the 6th century B.C.E., the kingdom of Israel was conquered by Assyria and the ten tribes were exiled from the land (II Kings 17), leaving only the tribes in the kingdom of Judah remaining to carry on Abraham's heritage. These people of the kingdom of Judah were generally known to themselves and to other nations as Yehudim (Jews), and that name continues to be used today.

    In common speech, the word "Jew" is used to refer to all of the physical and spiritual descendants of Jacob/Israel, as well as to the patriarchs Abraham and Isaac and their wives, and the word "Judaism" is used to refer to their beliefs. Technically, this usage is inaccurate, just as it is technically inaccurate to use the word "Indian" to refer to the original inhabitants of the Americas. However, this technically inaccurate usage is common both within the Jewish community and outside of it.
  7. Joined
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    03 Mar '09 03:50
    Thank you, Scriabin. 🙂
  8. Joined
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    04 Mar '09 20:473 edits
    Originally posted by Jigtie
    Can anyone explain why the most hated of Jesus disciples, ended up
    either carrying the name of the Jewish religion, or gave name to the it?

    Which is it, and why?
    I think the New Testament somehow makes names inconsquential for those of a superstitious bent.

    For example there was more than one Judas among Christ's disciples:

    "Judas, not Iscariot said to Him, Lord, and what has happened that You will manifest Yourself to us and not to the world." (John 14:22)

    Jesus had another disciple, Judas, who did not betray Him. In fact here he asked a very good and helpful question.


    There is even more than one Jesus in the New Testament. Paul relays to the church in Colossia a greeting from a disciple, Jesus -

    "Aristarchus, my fellow prisoner greets you, as well as Mark, the cousin of Barnabus ... and Jesus, who is called Justus ..." (Col. 4:10,11)

    And there are at least six Marys in the NT.
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    07 Mar '09 18:44
    Originally posted by jaywill
    I think the New Testament somehow makes names inconsquential for those of a superstitious bent.

    For example there was more than one [b]Judas
    among Christ's disciples:

    "Judas, not Iscariot said to Him, Lord, and what has happened that You will manifest Yourself to us and not to the world." (John 14:22)

    Jesus had another disciple, Jud ...[text shortened]... alled Justus ..." (Col. 4:10,11)

    And there are at least six Marys in the NT.[/b]
    Good thread.

    I agree J. The disiples were generally "working class" people with popular names as in today's society : Paul, David, John, Andrew etc. Jesus was, as you say, as popular name also.

    Jigtie, Judas would have been named after the tradition, not visa versa.
  10. At the Revolution
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    18 Mar '09 00:11
    Originally posted by Jigtie
    Can anyone explain why the most hated of Jesus disciples, ended up
    either carrying the name of the Jewish religion, or gave name to the it?

    Which is it, and why?
    ANTI-SEMITIC!!!!!

    (or, if you're Jewish)

    SELF-HATING JEW!!!!!!

    That was my ADL/AIPAC moment right there. 😉
  11. At the Revolution
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    18 Mar '09 00:13
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    I think the name is derived from the name of the country the jews lived in, Judea. But I'm by no means an expert on this matter, so this may be nonsense.
    No, I think you're right. The word "Judaism" was created before "Judas" was born, and the area "Judea" was founded before Judas' birth as well.
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