1. Standard memberRJHinds
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    27 Apr '14 20:11
    Migration after the Flood

    YouTube

    Here are the theories of animal migration according to the two theories. The evolution theory seems highly inadequate.
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    27 Apr '14 21:28
    bit slow to get going, but once he starts hitting the 'facts' it gets hilarious. recommended viewing for any atheists in the mood for a good scoff. if you have friends around you could play the 'christian-bllx' drinking game, every time the guy speaks a load of bllx you have a drink...........you will all be wasted by 5 mins into the video.
  3. Standard memberRJHinds
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    28 Apr '14 03:01
    Originally posted by stellspalfie
    bit slow to get going, but once he starts hitting the 'facts' it gets hilarious. recommended viewing for any atheists in the mood for a good scoff. if you have friends around you could play the 'christian-bllx' drinking game, every time the guy speaks a load of bllx you have a drink...........you will all be wasted by 5 mins into the video.
    If you were wasted by 5 mins into the video, then there is no wonder it all seemed hilarious to someone hooked on the atheist lies of evolution. Even atheists need to be able to think rationally to understand it.
  4. SubscriberSuzianne
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    28 Apr '14 07:19
    Originally posted by stellspalfie
    bit slow to get going, but once he starts hitting the 'facts' it gets hilarious. recommended viewing for any atheists in the mood for a good scoff. if you have friends around you could play the 'christian-bllx' drinking game, every time the guy speaks a load of bllx you have a drink...........you will all be wasted by 5 mins into the video.
    Umm, 'bllx'?
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    28 Apr '14 15:24
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Umm, 'bllx'?
    Add in some vowels. Start with O and see where that takes you.
  6. Standard memberRJHinds
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    01 May '14 07:50
    Archaeology, The Bible and The Post-Flood Origins of Chinese History

    An examination of Chinese tradition, and the legends of the equally ancient Far Eastern Miao tribes, suggests that China was colonised after a flood like that described in the Bible.

    Yu, the Chinese "Noah", overcame the flood waters, but he and his immediate predecessors are of a lineage well known to world mythology. The Bible, the ancient Sumerians and the Chinese all cite a chronology of ten rulers whose last member was the hero of a Great Flood epoch. Similar legends are known from Greece and India. Some modern scholars have recognised the unity of these genealogies and suggested they may have originated in ancient Sumeria. In our Biblical framework, the great flood was an actual event and each of these traditions indigenous to the lands where they are found. Such a currency of like traditions is to be expected on the basis of Scripture, and on that basis Miao are quite correct in ascribing the whole of post flood humanity to a single family.

    There are evidences in China's culture that indicate a Sumerian origin. Numerous archaeological remains and retained customs testify to the Sumerian and Japhetic origins of Chinese civilization.

    From Sumeria, mankind spread out across the earth and it seems quite probable that the ancestors of the Chinese accompanied the Japhetic migration into Europe. The Caucasian and Mongolian races have long been recognized as close genetic relatives.

    Stories of the first ten emperors of China follow a chronology much like that of the first ten generations of Genesis. Like Adam, the first emperor was specially created, ruled "over the earth" and wore the skins of animals. Shen-nung, the second emperor, was like Adam's son Cain in that he was the first farmer, who invented the plow and instigated the first markets. During another emperor's reign cattle were first herded, pitch pipes were invented and the first instruments of bronze and iron fashioned: Genesis 4:19-22 attributes these innovations to the sons of Lamech. The seventh man of each list was a bigamist. Noah and Yu, the tenth members of their lists, were flood heroes who developed a limp during the course of their labours and who were associated with the discovery of wine. The comparisons between Chinese and Biblical chronology are so many that many mythologists have admitted that they must have been inspired by the same source.

    https://www.creationism.org/csshs/v06n2p04.htm
  7. Standard memberRJHinds
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    01 May '14 07:561 edit
    "And unto Eber were born two sons: the name of one [was] Peleg; for in his days was the earth divided; and his brother's name [was] Joktan."
    (Genesis 10:25 KJV)

    "And unto Eber were born two sons: the name of the one [was] Peleg; because in his days the earth was divided: and his brother's name [was] Joktan."
    (1 Chronicles 1:19 KJV)

    In the Hebrew language the name 'Peleg' means a dividing by a "small channel of water" and is also root associated with the meaning of an earthquake. The Hebrew word used as 'divided' in the passage means to "split" something. According to the Bible genealogy, this man named Peleg was born 101 years after the flood. No doubt this Peleg was so named because of an event of great significance to the people living at the time he was born.


    Assuming that some land bridges existed briefly after the flood by whatever mechanism, the question is: Did man and beast have sufficient time to migrate from the resting place of the Ark to other continents before the dividing?

    Well, let's do the math:

    If you calculate the distance from eastern Mesopotamia to the tip of Australia and divide it by 100 years, you will find that both man and beast would only have to migrate less than 80 miles a year (0.21 miles a day) in order to reach Australia; less than 55 miles a year (0.15 miles a day) to reach North America via the Bearing Straits; and less than 48 miles a year (0.13 miles a day) if a land bridge (or possibly an ice bridge) existed across the northern polar regions. Those average daily distance requirements are much less than most people walk each day in their normal routines.

    http://www.kjvbible.org/peleg.html
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    01 May '14 09:59
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    [b]"And unto Eber were born two sons: the name of one [was] Peleg; for in his days was the earth divided; and his brother's name [was] Joktan."
    (Genesis 10:25 KJV)

    "And unto Eber were born two sons: the name of the one [was] Peleg; because in his days the earth was divided: and his brother's name [was] Joktan."
    (1 Chronicles 1:19 KJV)

    I ...[text shortened]... s than most people walk each day in their normal routines.

    http://www.kjvbible.org/peleg.html[/b]
    And if people doesn't believe this, then they are not real christians, right?
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    01 May '14 10:22
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Noah and Yu, the tenth members of their lists, were flood heroes who developed a limp during the course of their labours and who were associated with the discovery of wine
    So, what, there's two of them? And they both discovered how to make wine? Extraordinary! Now if this is not convincing, I don't know what is.

    Did this Yu fellow also gather specimens from all living animals onto his boat?
  10. Standard memberRJHinds
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    01 May '14 11:15
    Originally posted by C Hess
    So, what, there's two of them? And they both discovered how to make wine? Extraordinary! Now if this is not convincing, I don't know what is.

    Did this Yu fellow also gather specimens from all living animals onto his boat?
    Regarding Gen. 10:16-18 Morris writes:


    The Biblical mention of a people in the Far East named “Sinim” (Isaiah 49:12), together with references in ancient secular histories to people in the Far East called “Sinae,” at least suggests the possibility that some of Sin’s descendants migrated eastward, while others went south into the land of Canaan. It is significant that the Chinese people have always been identified by the prefix “Sino-” (e.g., Sino-Japanese War; Sinology, the study of Chinese history). The name “Sin” is frequently encountered in Chinese names in the form “Siang” or its equivalent.
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    01 May '14 12:17
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Regarding Gen. 10:16-18 Morris writes:


    The Biblical mention of a people in the Far East named “Sinim” (Isaiah 49:12), together with references in ancient secular histories to people in the Far East called “Sinae,” at least suggests the possibility that some of Sin’s descendants migrated eastward, while others went south into the land of Canaan. It is si ...[text shortened]... The name “Sin” is frequently encountered in Chinese names in the form “Siang” or its equivalent.
    Yeah, that whole thing was completely irrelevant to my question. 😕
  12. Standard memberRJHinds
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    01 May '14 13:47
    Originally posted by C Hess
    Yeah, that whole thing was completely irrelevant to my question. 😕
    I don't know the answer. Maybe there is something about it here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Flood_(China)
  13. Subscribersonhouse
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    01 May '14 19:24
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    I don't know the answer. Maybe there is something about it here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Flood_(China)
    You still haven't answered my question: How do you suppose human's survived those 10 asteroid hits that spread ejecta thousands of miles and would have caused such dust the sun would have been canceled out for several years. You said maybe that happened before man was around. So how long a time was that? 2 days? If it was only a couple of days, there would be no garden of Eden and everything would have been covered in hundreds of feed of ash and rocks.
  14. SubscriberBigDoggProblemonline
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    01 May '14 19:36
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Add in some vowels. Start with O and see where that takes you.
    Bollox is not a word used in America.
  15. Standard memberRJHinds
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    02 May '14 00:07
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    You still haven't answered my question: How do you suppose human's survived those 10 asteroid hits that spread ejecta thousands of miles and would have caused such dust the sun would have been canceled out for several years. You said maybe that happened before man was around. So how long a time was that? 2 days? If it was only a couple of days, there would ...[text shortened]... e no garden of Eden and everything would have been covered in hundreds of feed of ash and rocks.
    As you have said, there is no record of these things, so it does us no good speculating about it.
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