1. Melbourne, Australia
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    26 Sep '12 12:49
    LIST OF LIBERAL CHRISTIAN THEOLOGIANS AND AUTHORS:

    ANGLICAN AND PROTESTANT

    Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher (1768–1834), often called the "father of liberal theology," he claimed that religious experience was introspective, and that the most true understanding of God consisted of "a sense of absolute dependence".

    William Ellery Channing (1780–1842), Unitarian liberal theologian in the United States, who rejected the Trinity and the strength of scriptural authority, in favor of purely rationalistic "natural religion".

    Charles Augustus Briggs (1841–1913), early advocate of higher criticism of the Bible.

    Henry Ward Beecher (1813–1887), American preacher who left behind the Calvinist orthodoxy of his famous father, the Reverend Lyman Beecher, to instead preach the Social Gospel of liberal Christianity.

    Adolf von Harnack, (1851–1930), German theologian and church historian, promoted the Social Gospel.

    Charles Fillmore (1854–1948), Christian mystic influenced by Emerson; co-founder, with his wife, Myrtle Fillmore, of the Unity Church.

    Harry Emerson Fosdick (1878–1969), a Northern Baptist, founding pastor of New York's Riverside Church in 1922.

    Rudolf Bultmann (1884–1976), German biblical scholar, liberal Christian theologian until 1924.

    Paul Tillich (1886–1965), seminal figure in liberal Christianity; synthesized liberal Protestant theology with existentialist philosophy.

    Leslie Weatherhead (1893–1976), English preacher and author of The Will of God and The Christian Agnostic

    Lloyd Geering (1918&ndash๐Ÿ˜‰, New Zealand liberal theologian.

    Paul Moore, Jr. (1919–2003), 13th Episcopal Bishop, New York Diocese

    John A.T. Robinson (1919–1983), Anglican Bishop of Woolwich, author of Honest to God; later in life returned to orthodoxy, and dedicated himself to demonstrating very early authorship of the New Testament writings, publishing his findings in Redating the New Testament.

    John Hick (1922-2012) British philosopher of religion and liberal theologian.

    William Sloane Coffin (1924–2006), Senior Minister at the Riverside Church in New York City, and President of SANE/Freeze (now Peace Action).

    John Shelby Spong (1931&ndash๐Ÿ˜‰, Episcopalian bishop and very prolific author of books such as A New Christianity for a New World, in which he wrote of his rejection of historical religious and Christian beliefs such as Theism (belief in God as an external deity), the afterlife, miracles, and the Resurrection.

    Richard Holloway (1933-), Bishop of Edinburgh 1986-2000.

    Rubem Alves, (b. 1938) Brazilian, ex-Presbyterian, former minister, retired professor from UNICAMP, seminal figure in the liberation theology movement.

    Matthew Fox (priest) (b. 1940) American Episcopalian priest and theologian.

    Marcus Borg (b. 1942) American Biblical scholar, prolific author, fellow of the Jesus Seminar.

    Scotty McLennan (b. 1948) Unitarian Universalist minister, Stanford University professor and author.

    Michael Dowd (b. 1958) Religious Naturalist theologian and advocate of the Epic of Evolution movement.

    Douglas Ottati, Presbyterian theologian and author, former professor at Union-PSCE, current professor at Davidson College.

    ROMAN CATHOLIC:

    Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881–1955), a French Jesuit, also trained as a paleontologist; works condemned by the Holy Office in 1962. The condemnation was formally reaffirmed in 1981 but many theologians still refer to parts of his writings, including Pope Benedict XVI.[citation needed]

    Yves Congar (1904–1995), French Dominican ecumenical theologian.

    Edward Schillebeeckx, (1914–2009) Belgian Dominican theologian.

    Thomas Berry (1914-2009), American Passionist priest, cultural historian, geologian, and cosmologist.

    Raymond Edward Brown (May 22, 1928–August 8, 1998), a leading scholar of liberal New Testament exegesis, professor emeritus at Union Theological Seminary in New York (one of the leading centers of liberal Christianity in the United States).

    Hans Küng, (b. 1928) Swiss theologian. Had his license to teach Catholic theology revoked in 1979 because of his vocal rejection of the doctrine of the infallibility of the Pope, but remains a priest in good standing.

    John Dominic Crossan, (b. 1934) ex-Catholic and former priest, New Testament scholar, co-founder of the critical liberal Jesus Seminar.

    Joan Chittister, (b. 1936) Benedictine lecturer and social psychologist.

    Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza (born 1938) German feminist theologian and Professor at Harvard Divinity School

    Leonardo Boff, (b. 1938) Brazilian, ex-Franciscan and former priest, seminal author of the liberation theology movement, condemned by the Church; his works were condemned in 1985, and almost again condemned in 1992, which left him to leave the Franciscan order and the priestly ministry.

    Source:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberal_Christianity
  2. Maryland
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    26 Sep '12 13:53
    All religious leaders fall in one of two catagories: They are either uneducated or they are charlatans!
  3. Standard memberRJHinds
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    26 Sep '12 13:53
    Most true Christians are like John A.T. Robinson (1919–1983), Anglican Bishop of Woolwich, author of Honest to God; later in life returned to orthodoxy, and dedicated himself to demonstrating very early authorship of the New Testament writings, publishing his findings in Redating the New Testament.

    We all have that rebellious characteristic within us and choose to go our own way until we finally realize the truth of God was right under our nose all the time.

    HalleluYah !!! Praise the Lord! Holy! Holy! Holy!
  4. Melbourne, Australia
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    26 Sep '12 15:48
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Most true Christians are like John A.T. Robinson (1919–1983), Anglican Bishop of Woolwich, author of Honest to God; later in life returned to orthodoxy, and dedicated himself to demonstrating very early authorship of the New Testament writings, publishing his findings in Redating the New Testament.

    We all have that rebellious characteristic within us and ...[text shortened]... God was right under our nose all the time.

    HalleluYah !!! Praise the Lord! Holy! Holy! Holy!
    His writing still would challenge you.
  5. Melbourne, Australia
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    26 Sep '12 15:56
    Originally posted by 667joe
    All religious leaders fall in one of two catagories: They are either uneducated or they are charlatans!
    Unfortunately, intelligent and challenging theologians rarely become leaders, or if they do, it is to a minority. Some leaders are quite educated, but alas, like politics, they sometimes play to the gallery, seeking to maintain their tenure. Others have indeed been charlatans.
  6. Standard memberRJHinds
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    26 Sep '12 17:001 edit
    Originally posted by Taoman
    His writing still would challenge you.
    You mean his writings before his return ot orthodoxy? Certainly not Redating the New Testament, 1976.

    Although Robinson was within the liberal theology tradition, he challenged the work of colleagues in the field of exegetical criticism. Specifically, Robinson examined the New Testament's reliability, because he believed that very little original research had been completed in the field during the period between 1900 and the mid-1970s. Concluding his research, he wrote in his work, Redating the New Testament, that past scholarship was based on a "tyranny of unexamined assumptions" and an "almost willful blindness".

    Robinson concluded that much of the New Testament was written before AD 64, partly based on his judgement that there is little textual evidence that the New Testament reflects knowledge of the Temple's AD 70 destruction. In relation to the four gospels' dates of authorship, Robinson placed Matthew at 40 to after 60, Mark at about 45 to 60, Luke at before 57 to after 60, and John at from 40 to after 65. Robinson also argued that the letter of James was penned by a brother of Jesus Christ within twenty years of Jesus’ death, that Paul authored all the books that bear his name, and that the apostle John wrote the fourth Gospel. Robinson also opined that because of his investigations, a rewriting of many theologies of the New Testament was in order.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Robinson_(bishop_of_Woolwich)
  7. Melbourne, Australia
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    27 Sep '12 00:37
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    You mean his writings before his return ot orthodoxy? Certainly not Redating the New Testament, 1976.

    Although Robinson was within the liberal theology tradition, he challenged the work of colleagues in the field of exegetical criticism. Specifically, Robinson examined the New Testament's reliability, because he believed that very little original resear ...[text shortened]... estament was in order.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Robinson_(bishop_of_Woolwich)
    Also, from same reference:

    "Robinson's early dates for the gospels, especially John, have not carried widespread conviction among modern-critical scholars, although most conservative and traditionalist scholars concur with his dating of the synoptics."


    His views on the dating of the gospels doesn't necessarily mean his liberal understandings of Christian theology have been abandoned. His "Honest to God" was highly influential, well written, and still worth a read today.
  8. Standard memberRJHinds
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    27 Sep '12 05:41
    Originally posted by Taoman
    Also, from same reference:

    "Robinson's early dates for the gospels, especially John, have not carried widespread conviction among modern-critical scholars, although most conservative and traditionalist scholars concur with his dating of the synoptics."


    His views on the dating of the gospels doesn't necessarily mean his liberal understandings of Christ ...[text shortened]... d. His "Honest to God" was highly influential, well written, and still worth a read today.
    That was one of his earlier liberal writings before he learned the truth. ๐Ÿ˜
  9. Melbourne, Australia
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    27 Sep '12 13:39
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    That was one of his earlier liberal writings before he learned the truth. ๐Ÿ˜
    You are supposing that. Have you evidence he has abandoned his liberal thinking? Questioning dates of gospels can vary amongst liberal thinking theologians. He would not return to fundamentalism, which you self opine as the sole measure of "truth".
  10. Standard memberRJHinds
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    27 Sep '12 16:40
    Originally posted by Taoman
    You are supposing that. Have you evidence he has abandoned his liberal thinking? Questioning dates of gospels can vary amongst liberal thinking theologians. He would not return to fundamentalism, which you self opine as the sole measure of "truth".
    This is your own quote from your OP.

    John A.T. Robinson (1919–1983), Anglican Bishop of Woolwich, author of Honest to God; later in life returned to orthodoxy, and dedicated himself to demonstrating very early authorship of the New Testament writings, publishing his findings in Redating the New Testament.
  11. Melbourne, Australia
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    28 Sep '12 02:56
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    This is your own quote from your OP.

    John A.T. Robinson (1919–1983), Anglican Bishop of Woolwich, author of Honest to God; [b]later in life returned to orthodoxy
    , and dedicated himself to demonstrating very early authorship of the New Testament writings, publishing his findings in Redating the New Testament.[/b]
    So orthodoxy is equivalent to fundamentalism now? Why does his name remain in in the list? And all the other writers you, clutching at straws, avoid? At least he was a serious writer of books espousing a liberal but not faithless interpretation of the Christian canon.

    John A. T. Robinson was an Anglican bishop. He was predominantly a New Testament scholar in good Anglican style. His attitude and dating of the New Testament returned to orthodoxy. He is a long way from being a fundamentalist.

    His book, that he did so with is found online here:

    http://www.preteristarchive.com/Books/1976_robinson_redating-testament.html
    You may benefit from its reading, if you dare.

    I do not think you or any fundamentalists think like that in your idolatrous approach to the "Christian canon".
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