1. DonationAcolyte
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    03 May '05 21:47
    It seems that the great majority of people in the world end up with similar religious beliefs to one or both of their parents; while I might disagree with my parents on some specifics, I'd also put myself in this category.

    So, what do you think you have learned on religious matters from your parents? How much do you agree with their beliefs?
  2. Donationrwingett
    Ming the Merciless
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    04 May '05 04:11
    Originally posted by Acolyte
    It seems that the great majority of people in the world end up with similar religious beliefs to one or both of their parents; while I might disagree with my parents on some specifics, I'd also put myself in this category.

    So, what do you think you have learned on religious matters from your parents? How much do you agree with their beliefs?
    My parents are not very religious people, although they are nominal christians. So I learned very little from them in that regard. I differ from them in that while they have little use for their religion, I reject it entirely.
  3. Joined
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    04 May '05 05:40
    Originally posted by Acolyte
    It seems that the great majority of people in the world end up with similar religious beliefs to one or both of their parents; while I might disagree with my parents on some specifics, I'd also put myself in this category.

    So, what do you think you have learned on religious matters from your parents? How much do you agree with their beliefs?
    good thread topic...

    my mother is very spiritual, but in a non-obtrusive way, which is to say she didn't try to force the good book on me. my father yawns his way through the motions each sunday -- he doesn't complain, but he would rather be somewhere else. i am probably somewhere in between the two.

    but i think you are right that parents' beliefs shape the children's beliefs in a majority of cases. i guess there's little getting around that, as a by-product of family life. one thing i have enjoyed is that my parents have always given me room to make up my own mind. there's something dishonest, in my opinion, about going about it any other way.

    which reminds me, have any of you seen the movie The Big Kahuna? that movie tackles similar issues, and i'd be interested to hear any opinions on it.
  4. Standard membertelerion
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    04 May '05 05:40
    Originally posted by Acolyte
    It seems that the great majority of people in the world end up with similar religious beliefs to one or both of their parents; while I might disagree with my parents on some specifics, I'd also put myself in this category.

    So, what do you think you have learned on religious matters from your parents? How much do you agree with their beliefs?
    My mother is a very genuine, "Spirit-filled" xtian. Under her guidance, I grew up as a young xtian leader. From a very early age, she instilled in me a knowledge of the Bible, a knowledge that while slowly receding, still comes in handy.

    Thanks to her indoctination, I have the knowledge to comfortably reject xtianity as a truthful belief system. Thanks Mom.

    Oh yeah, the holy uprightness came in handy too. I may have been a preachy tool in high school, but it kept me out of trouble.
  5. Joined
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    04 May '05 08:45
    My mother is neither a Christian, nor particularly spiritual, so I didn't get any habitualisation from her. However, from the age of 6 up until 13 I went to boarding school with compulsary prayers, RE lessons and church twice on Sundays (matins and evensong). Believe it or not, I was in the choir... I was confirmed at 12 and probably considered myself a Christian back then. I never remember making this choice, it seemed to be a side product of the institutionalised atmosphere I was immersed in.

    When I began to educate myself instead of letting others do it for me, I realised there were two sides to the coin and re-examined my viewpoint.
  6. Standard memberdj2becker
    Tiger's ghost
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    04 May '05 10:29
    Originally posted by telerion
    My mother is a very genuine, "Spirit-filled" xtian. Under her guidance, I grew up as a young xtian leader. From a very early age, she instilled in me a knowledge of the Bible, a knowledge that while slowly receding, still comes in handy.

    Thanks to her indoctination, I have the knowledge to comfortably reject xtianity as a truthful belief system. T ...[text shortened]... ame in handy too. I may have been a preachy tool in high school, but it kept me out of trouble.
    Well that just shows the danger of having the Christain form, but denying its power. The letter kills, but the spirit brings life.
  7. Not Kansas
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    04 May '05 10:41
    My father was an atheist, yet considered himself Anglican because his mother was? I was made to go to Sunday School, where I learned to sing "Onward Christian Soldiers".
    My mother was an agnostic, spent her Sundays cooking. (Thanks Mom)
  8. London
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    04 May '05 11:15
    Originally posted by Acolyte
    It seems that the great majority of people in the world end up with similar religious beliefs to one or both of their parents; while I might disagree with my parents on some specifics, I'd also put myself in this category.

    So, what do you think you have learned on religious matters from your parents? How much do you agree with their beliefs?
    Nice topic.

    My parents are both reasonably devout Catholics (they go to Mass regularly, give to the poor etc.) and I had a normal Catholic upbringing. I guess I learned quite a bit from my parents - the value of prayer, the value of being part of a community of faith, the spirituality of Eastern Churches etc.

    I guess where I differ most with my parents is they are somewhat heterodox on a few matters like contraception, abortion, confessions etc. whereas I'm quite orthodox on these matters.
  9. Moving on...
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    04 May '05 11:23
    my dad tried to make me go to catholic church once but i messed about that much he never bothered again..thanks pops 😉
  10. Donationkirksey957
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    04 May '05 11:32
    I have been blessed to have a daughter who thinks for herself. I try not to make church a required ordeal, but honestly it is important for me to have them develop some values that define how they treat others. For me, as a parent, I care that she can think for herself. I see her caring for animals as part of her spiritual identity and this is good. Parents need to affirm the big picture instead of focusing on hard to believe Bible stories. It is also important for them to see me as living out my faith if it is important to me. If I'm a mess, Sunday morning really doesn't matter that much.
  11. Standard memberroyalchicken
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    04 May '05 14:09
    My parents were both raised as Catholics but neither has gone to church regularly or taken it seriously, AFAIK, as adults, although my older sister and I are baptised. I attended a Unitarian Universalist church with my mother from the ages 3-10. The UU church is very socially conscious and theologically vague. I stopped going as soon as my mum let me, but I imagine it informed my social views more than my religious ones. I don't know specifically what my father's religious views are; he has mentioned not believing in God, but I wonder how much Catholicism informs his outlook, because he took it quite seriously until about my age. My mum was an enthusiastic Catholic until she went to uni; I think her fundamental beef with Western religion is the patriarchy of it.

    Because of some old RHP threads, I think I've thought more specifically and artificially about what my beliefs are than my parents did. When next I speak to them, I'll ask my parents about this.
  12. Standard membertelerion
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    04 May '05 14:14
    Originally posted by dj2becker
    Well that just shows the danger of having the Christain form, but denying its power. The letter kills, but the spirit brings life.
    Stop being self-righteous and stick to the subject of the thread.
  13. Standard memberColetti
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    04 May '05 14:52
    Originally posted by telerion
    Stop being self-righteous and stick to the subject of the thread.
    telerion -the self appointed thought cop.
  14. Standard membertelerion
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    04 May '05 15:47
    Coletti, dj2, would either of you like to share with us?

    originally posted by Acolyte

    So, what do you think you have learned on religious matters from your parents? How much do you agree with their beliefs?
  15. Standard memberColetti
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    04 May '05 16:06
    Originally posted by telerion
    Coletti, dj2, would either of you like to share with us?

    originally posted by Acolyte

    So, what do you think you have learned on religious matters from your parents? How much do you agree with their beliefs?
    I'd say I'm more Calvinistic than my parents. Both go to conservative churches. When I was young, they where CEO Christians (Christmas and Easter Only). Later on they got more involved in church and teaching us to be critical about doctrinal issues. I became more interested in the details of my beliefs latter - studying them for consistency and clarity. I still have a lot to learn, but enjoy talks about politics and religion with both my parents. I don't agree with my parents in all details, but on critical issues of faith we agree.
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