1. Standard memberBosse de Nage
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    04 May '07 17:43
    Ragas of Morning and Night
    (Todi, Darbari) Gramavision 18-7018-7 (1986)

    http://www.ubu.com/sound/nath.html

    "This is a rare recording from 1968 India of Pandit PranNath singing Rags Todi and Darbari.

    Pran Nath's Ragas of Morning & Night has nothing to do with entertainment, everything to do with meditation and everything to do with New Age music, so much of which is profoundly influenced by traditional Indian music. As we listen, we are drawn in, captivated and eventually transported to psycho-spiritual clarity. Ragas is an intense album for serious listeners who regard listening as a process of inner development. "

    I'd like to hear from anyone with views on listening as a process of inner development.
  2. Hmmm . . .
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    04 May '07 17:53
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Ragas of Morning and Night
    (Todi, Darbari) Gramavision 18-7018-7 (1986)

    http://www.ubu.com/sound/nath.html

    "This is a rare recording from 1968 India of Pandit PranNath singing Rags Todi and Darbari.

    Pran Nath's Ragas of Morning & Night has nothing to do with entertainment, everything to do with meditation and everything to do with New Age m ...[text shortened]... "

    I'd like to hear from anyone with views on listening as a process of inner development.
    From a contemplative point of view, I am more vulnerable to music than anything else. There are few (or perhaps none, without lyrics) conceptual symbols for the “left-brain” to “translate.” I have a wonderful CD of Ravi Shankar and Yehudi Menuhin playing ragas together.

    Hasidic niggun, Sufi quwwali, Gregorian chant, Bach—songbirds...

    Currently, I have been using “The Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom” in Byzantine chant (in Greek).
  3. Standard memberBosse de Nage
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    04 May '07 17:58
    Originally posted by vistesd
    From a contemplative point of view, I am more vulnerable to music than anything else.
    Crudely speaking, music puts me in an altered state, but is it just brain candy?
  4. Joined
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    04 May '07 20:112 edits
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Ragas of Morning and Night
    (Todi, Darbari) Gramavision 18-7018-7 (1986)

    http://www.ubu.com/sound/nath.html

    "This is a rare recording from 1968 India of Pandit PranNath singing Rags Todi and Darbari.

    Pran Nath's Ragas of Morning & Night has nothing to do with entertainment, everything to do with meditation and everything to do with New Age m ...[text shortened]... "

    I'd like to hear from anyone with views on listening as a process of inner development.
    I guess I tend to see meditation and prayer as ways to quiet the mind so as to be able to hear one's 'inner voice of truth'. I see music as being able to help the meditative effort.

    I recommend Morton Feldman's late chamber works.

    I'm leaning toward 'brain candy'.
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    05 May '07 00:16
    "The hills are alive with the sound of music....."
  6. Hmmm . . .
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    06 May '07 00:56
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Crudely speaking, music puts me in an altered state, but is it just brain candy?
    Maybe the cacophony of the everyday wind-up puts you in an altered state, and the effect of the music you allude to restores you to a more original state—

    “The holy of holies abides behind
    the many veils and voices of the mind.”

    Before ToO nails me here: they are both probably natural states.
  7. Standard memberBosse de Nage
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    09 May '07 12:16
    Originally posted by vistesd
    Maybe the cacophony of the everyday wind-up puts you in an altered state, and the effect of the music you allude to restores you to a more original state—
    "Shut up and listen," I sez to myself.

    Classical music, like these ragas, has a form your mind perceives whilst listening--perhaps that form is my "altered state".

    Stuff like Joseph Beuys' "Abstract Energy" (http://www.ubu.com/sound/beuys.html ) seems to be less about form than about wiping your tapes. It's curiously compelling noise...
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