1. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    05 Sep '13 22:071 edit
    Rosh Hashana - The Feast of Trumpets

    "Happy Rosh Hashanah to you all, as we live each day with joy and excitement at the imminent return of our Lord to take His Bride on Rosh Hashanah. Rosh Hashanah starts at sundown, Wed. Sept 4, and ends sundown Friday, Sept 6. Approx. 6:59pm in Jerusalem time, sunset which starts the new day of Rosh Hashanah, Sept 5. Jerusalem is 7 hours ahead of us, and watching for the new moonrise is to rise which is the start of the of the Feast of Trumpets.

    Rosh Hashanah marks the begining of the new year on the Jewish calendar. It falls on the first day of Tishri, the seventh month of the Hebrew lunar calendar, and is the only feast that falls on the new moon. It is celebrated for two days on the 1st and 2nd marked by the sighting of the new moon, on the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar.

    It is described in the Torah as Yom Teru'ah, a day of sounding the Shofar (the trumpet used for the celebration). It is also considered the anniversary of the creation of Adam and Eve, and a Day of Judgement and Coronation of God as King. Rosh Hashanah is the Hebrew name for the Feast of Trumpets, also other names and their meanings are; Tom Teruah (Day of Awakening Blast or Resurrection); Yom Hadin (Day of Judgment); Yom Zikaron (Day of Remembrance); and Yom Hamelech (Day of Coronation of the King), interestingly all the names allude to the coming of the Messiah!

    There are four types of blasts blown during the festival:
    1)Tekiah - one three second blasts (sound the King's coronation)
    2) Shevarim - three medium blasts (sound repentance - wailing)
    3) Teruah - nine quick blasts (to arouse on from a spiritual slumber)
    4) Tekiah Hagedolah - the last, longest and loudest blast (to come forth or to arise last call to repentance before the great Day of the Lord)
    -------------------------------------
    Prophetic Implications
    -------------------------------------
    Yom Zikaron (Day of Remembrance) Mal 3:16–18
    16 Then those who feared the LORD spoke to one another, and the LORD gave attention and heard it, and a book of remembrance was written before Him for those who fear the LORD and who esteem His name.
    17 “They will be Mine,” says the LORD of hosts, “on the day that I prepare My own possession, and I will spare them as a man spares his own son who serves him.”
    18 So you will again distinguish between the righteous and the wicked, between one who serves God and one who does not serve Him.
    -----------------------------------------
    He will spare them from what?
    -----------------------------------------
    Mal 4:1–3
    4:1 “For behold, the day is coming, burning like a furnace; and all the arrogant and every evildoer will be chaff; and the day that is coming will set them ablaze,” says the LORD of hosts, “so that it will leave them neither root nor branch.”
    2 “But for you who fear My name, the sun of righteousness will rise with healing in its wings; and you will go forth and skip about like calves from the stall.
    3 “You will tread down the wicked, for they will be ashes under the soles of your feet on the day which I am preparing,” says the LORD of hosts.
    Da 12:1–4
    12:1 “Now at that time Michael, the great prince who stands guard over the sons of your people, will arise. And there will be a time of distress such as never occurred since there was a nation until that time; and at that time your people, everyone who is found written in the book, will be rescued.
    2 “Many of those who sleep in the dust of the ground will awake, these to everlasting life, but the others to disgrace and everlasting contempt.
    3 “Those who have insight will shine brightly like the brightness of the expanse of heaven, and those who lead the many to righteousness, like the stars forever and ever.
    4 “But as for you, Daniel, conceal these words and seal up the book until the end of time; many will go back and forth, and knowledge will increase.”

    The Spring Feasts picture events of our LORD's first coming and all four feasts have all been fulfilled by Jesus' first coming!
    Pesach - The Passover - His Death
    Hag Ha Matzah - The Feast of Unleavened Bread - His Burial
    Yom Bikkurim - The Feast of First Fruits - His Resurrection
    Shavuot - The Feast of Pentecost - Indwelling of the Holy Spirit
    The Fall Feasts picture events surrounding His second coming to be fulfilled in the last book, the Revelation (of Jesus Christ)

    Rosh Hashana - The Feast of Trumpets - Christ will honor and fulfill by taking His bride to the Father's house (Jewish wedding custom)
    Yom Kippur - The Day of Atonement - Second Advent or Coming
    Sukkot - The Feast of Tabernacles - His Kingdom setup on earth and His dwelling with us (residence or dwelling place)

    An interesting point is that the longest gap between the two of feasts is the gap between The Feast of Pentecost and The Feast of Trumpets, which alludes to the lengthy time between Christ's two comings. The Feast of Trumpets is the only feast that falls on the new moon, as the rabbis watch for the appearance of the new moon, because no one knows the day or the hour when it will appear.
    Mk 13:32
    32 “But of that day or hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but the Father alone.
    1 Th 4:16–18
    16 For the Lord Himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel and with the trumpet of God, and the dead in Christ will rise first.
    17 Then we who are alive and remain will be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air, and so we shall always be with the Lord.
    18 Therefore comfort one another with these words.
    1 Co 15:51–52
    51 Behold, I tell you a mystery; we will not all sleep, but we will all be changed,
    52 in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet; for the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we will be changed.

    This last trumpet cannot be referring to the seventh trumpet of judgment in the book of Revelation (had not been written yet, which is to start the seven bowl judgments). No one asked Paul which trumpet he was referring to, as they must have all assumed he was referring to the Tekiah Hagedolah, the last blast of Rosh Hashanah. Since the spring feasts were fulfilled by Christ each on the exact day and hour, it would stand to reason that the fall feasts would also be fulfilled the same way.” (forward received this morning from a Pastor in Israel)
  2. SubscriberSuzianne
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    06 Sep '13 01:07
    Nice, Bob. Thanks for this info. Despite having several Jewish friends, I'm embarassingly ignorant of much of Jewish Tradition.
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    06 Sep '13 10:19
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Nice, Bob. Thanks for this info. Despite having several Jewish friends, I'm embarassingly ignorant of much of Jewish Tradition.
    At last! Someone who has bothered about to learn about Judaism.
  4. Hmmm . . .
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    06 Sep '13 15:183 edits
    Originally posted by Tygert
    At last! Someone who has bothered about to learn about Judaism.
    Yes. There are open-minded people on here. I grew up Lutheran (later, Episcopalian), and was pretty much taught that Judaism is “the religion of the ‘Old Testament’” (it is not). Later in life (about 45 or so), I learned that I had some Jewish heritage (my great grandfather was Jewish; he married a Catholic woman, and I guess all the children became Christian—the Jewish connection was kept as some kind of secret in the family, till my grandmother told me about it just before she died (one month shy of her 99th birthday). I later was able to confirm it, but the genealogy quickly fades into the mist; likely, my ancestors on that side were Sephardic Jews who came from the area around Glückstadt; my great-great grandfather emigrated from there while it was still part of Denmark.

    I was intrigued, and had never really studied Judaism. I spent several years studying (on my own), and some folks on here will remember when almost all my posts presented Jewish perspectives. I learned just enough Hebrew (learning more how the language works, than trying to become fluent) to parse short texts—but then, comparative close readings are a staple of midrashic exegesis. I learned about the Oral Torah (Talmud, Midrash, and kabbalistic texts such as the Zohar), and how the Oral Torah is not fixed by eventually having been written down, but continues as an expansive process—the ongoing Torah. My favorite book on Talmud is Marc-Alain Ouaknin’s The Burnt Book: Reading the Talmud—but that’s a pretty “deep end” treatise, and I read some more introductory commentaries first. I own one volume of the Schottenstein (English-Aramiac/Hebrew interlinear) Talmud: Tractate Megillah. I read Abraham Joshuah Heschel, Lawrence Kushner, Judith Prager (A Path of Blessing),Judith Plaskow (Standing Again at Sinai), Rami Shapiro, Daniel Matt (I have several volumes of his celebrated translation of the Zohar), the French philosopher Emmanuel Levinas’ Talmudic discourses, Abraham Isaac Kook—to name just a few favorites. I have the Reform siddur Mishkan T’fillah, which I sometimes delve into; and my wife and I occasionally celebrate Erev Shabbat at home. I enjoy listening to Hasidic niggun (and made up my own little tune to sing Shema Yisrael).

    I am, of course, not halachically a Jew, nor have I attempted to become one. But I do resonate to the particularly broad stream of nondualism in Judaism (Lawrence Kushner’s Honey from the Rock is a lovely little book, following the sephirot to the One). I haven’t done any of that for awhile now—perhaps Rosh Hashanah, though it ends tonight, would be a good time to start again . . .

    The best introductory book that I found was David S. Ariel’s What Do Jews Believe?, if anyone is interested.

    Baruch Hashem. And Shalom (peace and well-being).
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    06 Sep '13 19:161 edit
    Originally posted by vistesd
    Yes. There are open-minded people on here. I grew up Lutheran (later, Episcopalian), and was pretty much taught that Judaism is “the religion of the ‘Old Testament’” (it is not). Later in life (about 45 or so), I learned that I had some Jewish heritage (my great grandfather was Jewish; he married a Catholic woman, and I guess all the children became Chris ...[text shortened]... ve?[/i], if anyone is interested.

    Baruch Hashem. And Shalom (peace and well-being).
    Thank you very much. It seems you have actually done more studying Judaism than I have! 🙂 I suppose I'm 14 though...

    If you suddenly convert then Shanah Tovah for yesterday.
  6. Hmmm . . .
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    06 Sep '13 22:30
    Originally posted by Tygert
    Thank you very much. It seems you have actually done more studying Judaism than I have! 🙂 I suppose I'm 14 though...

    If you suddenly convert then Shanah Tovah for yesterday.
    🙂
  7. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    07 Sep '13 02:21
    What's the cause of virulent strains of anti-Semitism within some sectors of the United States of America
    (this question is primarily directed to the individual who gave the conversation its only 'thumbs down'😉?
  8. Hmmm . . .
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    07 Sep '13 13:44
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    What's the cause of virulent strains of anti-Semitism within some sectors of the United States of America
    (this question is primarily directed to the individual who gave the conversation its only 'thumbs down'😉?
    Just a brief comment (I did not give you a thumbs down): I think that although much bigotry might be rooted in ignorance, and much is based on hand-me-down beliefs that go unquestioned, all bigotry is essentially self-serving—finding others that one can claim are fundamentally deficient and inferior, allows one to feel (sometimes subconsciously) fundamentally superior. Sometimes that kind of feeling can be so psychologically entrenched that repudiation of the bigotry can feel like self-repudiation—not just the self-repudiation of one’s actions, but a deeper self-repudiation of who one is.

    In any event, I think the relevant question is, “What does this person, or group, gain by their bigotry?”—actually or psychologically.
  9. Hmmm . . .
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    07 Sep '13 16:40
    Originally posted by vistesd
    🙂
    Tygert, my smiley face was for your last comment; it was not a smile of smugness at whatever I may have learned.
  10. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    07 Sep '13 16:58
    Originally posted by vistesd
    Just a brief comment (I did not give you a thumbs down): I think that although much bigotry might be rooted in ignorance, and much is based on hand-me-down beliefs that go unquestioned, all bigotry is essentially self-serving—finding others that one can claim are fundamentally deficient and inferior, allows one to feel (sometimes subconsciously) fundamental ...[text shortened]... s, “What does this person, or group, gain by their bigotry?”—actually or psychologically.
    Now [4]...
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    07 Sep '13 18:02
    Originally posted by vistesd
    Tygert, my smiley face was for your last comment; it was not a smile of smugness at whatever I may have learned.
    Don't worry, I interpreted it the right way. 🙂
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    07 Sep '13 18:241 edit
    Originally posted by Tygert
    Don't worry, I interpreted it the right way. 🙂
    My Mum is Jewish, my Mum's parents were Jewish, she is Israeli, my grandfather is the principal of the most Jewish school in Africa. Yup, I come from a pretty Jewish family. I go to a Christian school and it is very irritating listening to brainwash that I'm going to go to hell every morning chapel service. From this I have a bad impression of Christians (sorry RJHinds, I'm judging you on a stereotype)

    There was a terrible sermon relating friends to Harry Potter to Christ and how Harry Potter always looked out for his friends. The speaker then said that Christ always looked out for his friends. He, as usual, told everyone that non-Christians will go to hell. ON the morning of Rosh Hashanah. And everyone makes the sound of coins clacking together with their keys every time I walk past them.

    Edit: I must say that I was rather amused when later that day, in my IsiXhosa lesson, my very religious Afrikaner teacher said that he had been offended that the speaker related Christianity with anything to do with witchcraft.
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    07 Sep '13 18:451 edit
    On a different note, my Dad's family is the exact opposite. My paternal grandfather is very Anti-Semitic and used to run his own racist party during Apartheid. My dad and mom played a prank on him, they told him that my dad was going to convert to marry her. He was completely shocked. They were kicking themselves under the table with laughter!
  14. Hmmm . . .
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    07 Sep '13 18:461 edit
    Originally posted by Tygert
    On a different note, my Dad's family is the exact opposite. My paternal grandfather is very Anti-Semitic and used to run his own racist party during Apartheid. My dad a mom played a prank on him, they told him that my dad was going to convert to marry her. He was completely shocked. They were kicking themselves under the table with laughter!
    My family is pretty much the other way around.

    Apparently you're not orthodox, 'cause here we are, posting on shabbat. 🙂
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    07 Sep '13 18:50
    Originally posted by vistesd
    My family is pretty much the other way around.

    Apparently you're not orthodox, 'cause here we are, posting on shabbat. 🙂
    Yup, I am reformed. Family isn't.
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