1. Joined
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    21 Apr '11 15:17
    Or, in some sources, semi-theism, is a term I find in some texts that concern Eastern religions, but I don't find an explanation of it that feels complete. Any ideas?

    Example: http://www.jstor.org/pss/1397540

    I would cut and paste from it, but that doesn't seem possible and I am not eligible for a JSTOR account.
  2. Standard memberrvsakhadeo
    rvsakhadeo
    India
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    24 Apr '11 13:35
    Originally posted by JS357
    Or, in some sources, semi-theism, is a term I find in some texts that concern Eastern religions, but I don't find an explanation of it that feels complete. Any ideas?

    Example: http://www.jstor.org/pss/1397540

    I would cut and paste from it, but that doesn't seem possible and I am not eligible for a JSTOR account.
    Buddhism may not be considered as a Religion. It is rather an ethical system or a philosophy,pl.vide Dawkins' book the god delusion page 59. Sankhya is one of 6 systems of viewing reality,as per Hindu theology and not a separate Religion. But I will come back.
  3. Joined
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    24 Apr '11 17:09
    Originally posted by JS357
    Or, in some sources, semi-theism, is a term I find in some texts that concern Eastern religions, but I don't find an explanation of it that feels complete. Any ideas?

    Example: http://www.jstor.org/pss/1397540

    I would cut and paste from it, but that doesn't seem possible and I am not eligible for a JSTOR account.
    You can find a more complete explanation later in the article (page 205). Of course, whether or not you still find it lacking is another question.

    http://www.cds.caltech.edu/~nair/NewInterpretationIndianAtheism.pdf
    Still another is represented
    by the fact that, though repudiating the notion of God, these atheistic systems
    introduce afterwards the concept of God. The SPfihya and the MTmPmsH
    make use of the idea of God for resolving metaphysical problems in their
    systems. As against this, Buddhism and Jainism find their own God to satisfy
    their religious aspirations. The concept of Jina, having the divine attributes
    of eternality, omniscience, and religious worship, comes close to the notion
    of a personal God ( f h a r a ) .Likewise, the concept of the Dharmakiiya, possessing
    the divine qualities of omniscience, omnipotence, religious worship,
    and the like, is a virtual substitute for God in Buddhism.
    It is thus obvious that the atheistic systems such as the Sg&ya, the
    Mimgmsg, and the rest are not atheistic. Instead, they show unmistakable
    leanings toward theism. Their true religious position appears to be neither
    atheism nor theism. It is not the former, since they show clear theistic trends,
    and it is not the latter, since these systems openly reject God by advancing
    various arguments. All this suggests that their true religious doctrine is not
    atheism but rather semi-theism, that is, a doctrine which shows clear tendencies
    towards theism.
  4. Standard memberrvsakhadeo
    rvsakhadeo
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    24 Apr '11 17:20
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    You can find a more complete explanation later in the article (page 205). Of course, whether or not you still find it lacking is another question.

    http://www.cds.caltech.edu/~nair/NewInterpretationIndianAtheism.pdf
    Still another is represented
    by the fact that, though repudiating the notion of God, these atheistic systems
    introduce afterwards ...[text shortened]... ut rather semi-theism, that is, a doctrine which shows clear tendencies
    towards theism.
    The misprinted words starting respectively from S and M are actually Sankhya and Mimamsa,two of the six ways of viewing Reality,as per Hindu theology.
  5. Joined
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    24 Apr '11 17:22
    Originally posted by rvsakhadeo
    The misprinted words starting respectively from S and M are actually Sankhya and Mimamsa,two of the six ways of viewing Reality,as per Hindu theology.
    Actually, there are more misprints in the paste than that, but anyone really interested can look at the link.
  6. Joined
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    6788
    25 Apr '11 00:38
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    You can find a more complete explanation later in the article (page 205). Of course, whether or not you still find it lacking is another question.

    http://www.cds.caltech.edu/~nair/NewInterpretationIndianAtheism.pdf
    Still another is represented
    by the fact that, though repudiating the notion of God, these atheistic systems
    introduce afterwards ...[text shortened]... ut rather semi-theism, that is, a doctrine which shows clear tendencies
    towards theism.
    I will have to look at it, and will almost certainly not find it lacking, more likely, it will be additive to my understanding. I think in general is it useful to have a God concept, a concept of an God that fits our view of the world, without commitment to whether that or any God exists.
  7. Standard memberChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    American West
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    25 Apr '11 02:47
    Originally posted by JS357
    Or, in some sources, semi-theism, is a term I find in some texts that concern Eastern religions, but I don't find an explanation of it that feels complete. Any ideas?

    Example: http://www.jstor.org/pss/1397540

    I would cut and paste from it, but that doesn't seem possible and I am not eligible for a JSTOR account.
    Anti-semitheism caused the Hollocaust.
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