1. Melbourne, Australia
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    09 Sep '12 17:07
    "...Fear of otherness lies at the root of prejudice. From the point of view of duality – nothing is as ‘other’ or dissimilar as the non-dual state. From the perspective of non-duality, we are prejudiced against our own natural state.

    In the condition of dualistic estrangement – our own beginningless enlightenment becomes alien to us, and we therefore become antagonistic to it in every form it assumes. From this primitive antagonism every type of prejudice arises: racial discrimination, chauvinism, sectarianism, religious bigotry, bias, intolerance, insularity, fanaticism, and narrow-mindedness.

    Within the self-created field of dualistic bewilderment, that which is natural seems unnatural – and that which seems natural is unnatural. On the basis of this primitive prejudice against reality, all other forms of prejudice arise – prejudices against: race, gender, physiognomy, sexual orientation, religion, nationality, class, intellectual capacity, age, and appearance – ad nauseam. Whatever form of distinction has existed in the world, prejudice has existed with regard to it. It is evident from this that the focus of prejudice is always empty of the causes of prejudice. The only cause of prejudice is fear of otherness.

    Although prejudice—as a distorted aspect of experience—is a phenomenon which people of good heart and humanity have sought to eliminate for several centuries – it still persists. Prejudice persists and will always persist – whilst we remain in ignorance of the natural state."

    http://www.aroencyclopaedia.org/shared/text/p/pride_prejudice_ar_eng.php
  2. Account suspended
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    09 Sep '12 17:11
    Originally posted by Taoman
    "...Fear of otherness lies at the root of prejudice. From the point of view of duality – nothing is as ‘other’ or dissimilar as the non-dual state. From the perspective of non-duality, we are prejudiced against our own natural state.

    In the condition of dualistic estrangement – our own beginningless enlightenment becomes alien to us, and we therefore becom ...[text shortened]... he natural state."

    http://www.aroencyclopaedia.org/shared/text/p/pride_prejudice_ar_eng.php
    interesting, it is written, that perfect love, throws fear outside.
  3. Melbourne, Australia
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    10 Sep '12 03:22
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    interesting, it is written, that perfect love, throws fear outside.
    Yes indeed robbie.
    The best face of love is open acceptance, which does not mean uncritical agreement or anything goes.
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    10 Sep '12 12:471 edit
    Originally posted by Taoman
    Yes indeed robbie.
    The best face of love is open acceptance, which does not mean uncritical agreement or anything goes.
    I think it has been my experience that prejudice is usually displayed when
    understanding is lacking regarding the position of another. Understanding is paramount
    me thinks, for even if we do not, like you say, uncritically agree or acquiesce with a
    position, at least we can understand why it has been taken. For understanding to take
    place, empathy must be present and for empathy to be present a willingness to be
    objective and unassuming must be cultivated, this has as its basis compassion and
    humanity, a realisation in the fallibility and propensity for aberration in ourselves and
    others. Where does one learn such noble qualities? Do we have a natural tendency
    towards these things, or are they learned from example? As we suffer ourselves, does
    our suffering harden our hearts or do they make us more compassionate. Its really
    really interesting Toaman and I thank you for posting the topic - regards Robbie.
  5. Melbourne, Australia
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    10 Sep '12 14:544 edits
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    I think it has been my experience that prejudice is usually displayed when
    understanding is lacking regarding the position of another. Understanding is paramount
    me thinks, for even if we do not, like you say, uncritically agree or acquiesce with a
    position, at least we can understand why it has been taken. For understanding to take
    place, e ...[text shortened]... Its really
    really interesting Toaman and I thank you for posting the topic - regards Robbie.
    Thank you robbie. Where indeed do noble qualities arise from?

    Some say the highest quality of unconditional love, with other related words, like grace and compassion accompanies wisdom. As wisdom arises so does compassion and openness. Some feel it is an inherent quality of the Voidal Fulness (Buddhist terminology, - "God" for the theist). This idea shifts towards an "entity" that is problematical for Buddhist understanding (tho not a formal Buddhist I align obviously closely with it's view) - of absence of final definition and interdependence of all aspects of life and mind. So I respond to the idea better that as we become less ignorant we also become more open and accepting. They arise together. In Buddhist understanding Wisdom and Compassion are two sides of the one coin, so to speak. There is a similar understanding in the Taoist way

    So, that as ignorance lessens, the wider view naturally evokes the more noble qualities. This also means that our lesser qualities and "damage" begin to heal of themselves. With greater clarity the light shines better and darkness recedes of itself. Again this is not to say at an everyday level, crime and hatred is not to be countered and contained, but even then, lessening ignorance of the other helps. And where the convicted are treated with compassion, some healing does occur. There are fine enlightened programs in some prisons. There needs to be more, but they cost money. 🙁

    Should one who has committed a crime in the midst of a serious mental illness be sent to jail, or to hospital? Too often it is the former.

    Though one can confront another even roughly, this happens in caring close families too and can we not still regard a younger one as our son even if errant? Or an elder as our mother or father, or another as a brother or a sister, no matter surface differences - skin, sexual orientation, gender, religion (or non-religion), nationality, political affiliation?
    We squabble and shout and argue, we sing and eat and dance, we are at best a fellow family member, in whatever state. Let us be aware of our words to one another - I mean generally. Words of confrontation are ok but for healing and growing insight. Mere words of abuse advance nothing. Each human encounter is an act towards lesser ignorance whether spoken or silent. All is interdependent and we "learn" from each other's actions, for lesser or for greater.
    How do you see it?
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