1. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    Just another day
    tinyurl.com/y8wgt7a5
    Joined
    23 Aug '04
    Moves
    24791
    08 Mar '10 15:067 edits
    The indiginous people of Los Angeles were, interestingly enough, monotheists or something similar when the Spanish showed up. They even had some sort of "Jesus" like figure who is supposed to be buried in some mountain in Arizona or something.

    Like YHWH and Hastur, their god has a name which is not to be uttered.

    How did this happen? Coincidence? Instinct? Revelation?

    EDIT -

    Specifically, the Tongva believed in one god, whose sacred name of Qua-o-ar or Chingichngish they rarely uttered. In common speech they would refer to Y-yo-ha-rivg-nain, which translated to The Giver of Life. This supreme being organized the universe and laid it out on the shoulders of seven giants. The Tongva creation story matched that of the Christians in that it concerned a first man and woman, Tobohar and Pabavit, and the fact that Qua-o-ar lived in a heaven-like location, receiving the souls of all who die.

    http://www.habitatauthority.org/pdf/native_american_history.pdf

    Chingichngish (Chinigchinix, Chinigchinich, Changitchnish, etc.) is the name of an important figure in the mythology of the Luiseño. The Luiseño, or Payomkowishum are a Native American people who at the time of the first contacts with the Spanish in the 16th century inhabited the coastal area of southern California, ranging 50 miles from the southern part of Los Angeles County, California to the northern part of San Diego...

    The Tongva are a Native American people who inhabited the area in and around Los Angeles, California, before the arrival of Europeans. Tongva means "people of the earth" in the Tongva language, a language in the Uto-Aztecan family. The Tongva are also sometimes referred to as the Gabrieleño/Tongva...

    Chingichngish, also known as Tobet, Saor, and Kwawar, was not the Luiseño creator, nor was he their earliest personified deity. Rather, he was a culture hero.

    A culture hero is a mythological hero specific to some group who changes the world through invention or discovery. A typical culture hero might be credited as the discoverer of fire, or agriculture, songs, tradition and religion, and is usually the most important legendary figure of a people...a figure who made humans and established some elements of their lifeways. The claim that traditional Luiseño religion was monotheistic is without foundation. However, some Indians suggested that Chingichngish could be identified with Christ.

    http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Chinigchinix
  2. Joined
    04 Feb '05
    Moves
    29132
    08 Mar '10 15:13
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    The indiginous people of Los Angeles were, interestingly enough, monotheists when the Spanish showed up. They even had some sort of "Jesus" like figure who is supposed to be buried in some mountain in Arizona or something.

    Like YHWH and Hastur, their god has a name which is not to be uttered.

    How did this happen? Coincidence? Instinct? Revela ...[text shortened]... e souls of all who die.

    http://www.habitatauthority.org/pdf/native_american_history.pdf[/i]
    what are you saying exactly?
  3. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    Just another day
    tinyurl.com/y8wgt7a5
    Joined
    23 Aug '04
    Moves
    24791
    08 Mar '10 15:33
    Originally posted by Zahlanzi
    what are you saying exactly?
    What I wrote exactly is in the post above yours. However, my point is that there were suprising similarities in indiginous Tongva religion and the Abrahamic religions. What is the explanation?
  4. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    Just another day
    tinyurl.com/y8wgt7a5
    Joined
    23 Aug '04
    Moves
    24791
    08 Mar '10 15:56
    This observations seems to lend some support to the claims of Mormonism.
  5. Cape Town
    Joined
    14 Apr '05
    Moves
    52945
    08 Mar '10 16:13
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    What I wrote exactly is in the post above yours. However, my point is that there were suprising similarities in indiginous Tongva religion and the Abrahamic religions. What is the explanation?
    I suspect that the explanation is that we tend to see similarities and not differences and wrongly conclude that they are more prevalent than predicted by probability.

    Whats the chance that a religion will be monotheistic? I don't know, but it is hardly surprising to find more than one such religion on the face of the earth. The other 'co-incidences' are rather stretched, but even if they were clear similarities, the chance that the would occur seems to me to be quite high.
  6. Joined
    04 Feb '05
    Moves
    29132
    09 Mar '10 09:20
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    What I wrote exactly is in the post above yours. However, my point is that there were suprising similarities in indiginous Tongva religion and the Abrahamic religions. What is the explanation?
    coincidence. you only posted a few obscure similarities. something that might occur in many other instances.

    the same kind of similiarities between nostradamus "predictions" and real world events. if given enough time, you can find similarities between nazi germany and the vatican.
Back to Top