1. Standard memberDarfius
    The Apologist
    Joined
    22 Dec '04
    Moves
    41172
    31 Mar '05 06:43
    Please help. I'm confused on this issue.
  2. Standard memberDarfius
    The Apologist
    Joined
    22 Dec '04
    Moves
    41172
    31 Mar '05 06:47
    Also, why do humans have such huge brains? Brains use up ~60% of newborn's energy.

    Evolutionists, help me out, what was the purpose of huge brains even before we had agriculture and reliable sources of food?

  3. NY
    Joined
    29 Mar '05
    Moves
    1085
    31 Mar '05 07:00
    we evolved from donkeys.. cause here are sooo many asses out there... but as for brains.. why do birds develop wings befor tey can fly.. thats kinda' a dumb ass question..lol.. why do fish have gills befor they hatch..
  4. Copenhagen
    Joined
    31 May '04
    Moves
    6955
    31 Mar '05 07:39
    Originally posted by Darfius
    Also, why do humans have such huge brains? Brains use up ~60% of newborn's energy.

    Evolutionists, help me out, what was the purpose of huge brains even before we had agriculture and reliable sources of food?

    It's obvious. So we could learn to play chess!

    On a more serious note, brain size isn't something we developed and the took in use, you're thinking in creationist ways here. It's a trial and error process. The brain size developed alongside with our needs, and involves many factors, including social strutures, anatomical features (e.g. opposable thumps), and geographical circumstances.

    Look at this website for further information: http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?articleID=0007B7DC-6738-1DC9-AF71809EC588EEDF&sc=I100322
  5. Account suspended
    Joined
    30 Nov '04
    Moves
    25465
    31 Mar '05 08:09
    Originally posted by Darfius
    Please help. I'm confused on this issue.
    Rabbits with the big floppy ears. pffffffft. Honestly.

    Ps. Go to School sunshine.
  6. NY
    Joined
    29 Mar '05
    Moves
    1085
    31 Mar '05 08:11
    its not how big it is... its how you use it ... yer brain you perv...
  7. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    West Coast Rioter
    tinyurl.com/y7loem9q
    Joined
    23 Aug '04
    Moves
    24791
    31 Mar '05 08:15
    Originally posted by Darfius
    Please help. I'm confused on this issue.
    It depends on what you define "human" as. Homo sapiens sapiens probably evolved from Homo sapiens (archaic) which evolved from Homo erectus.

    http://www.onelife.com/evolve/manev.html
  8. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    West Coast Rioter
    tinyurl.com/y7loem9q
    Joined
    23 Aug '04
    Moves
    24791
    31 Mar '05 08:17
    Originally posted by Darfius
    Also, why do humans have such huge brains? Brains use up ~60% of newborn's energy.

    Evolutionists, help me out, what was the purpose of huge brains even before we had agriculture and reliable sources of food?

    Large brains probably gave us adaptability to different environments and situations, the ability to use fire and make and use tools, and to cooperate with one another, at least. Isn't it obvious that intelligence is an extraordinarily powerful thing?
  9. Account suspended
    Joined
    30 Nov '04
    Moves
    25465
    31 Mar '05 08:20
    Originally posted by xxxenophobe
    its not how big it is... its how you use it ... yer brain you perv...
    Who you calling a perv sunshine. I am the least perv on this planet. pfffffffft.

    Ps. Come on lads.
  10. NY
    Joined
    29 Mar '05
    Moves
    1085
    31 Mar '05 08:24
    oh.. i must be takn up yer slack.. 🙄
  11. Standard memberDarfius
    The Apologist
    Joined
    22 Dec '04
    Moves
    41172
    31 Mar '05 08:39
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Large brains probably gave us adaptability to different environments and situations, the ability to use fire and make and use tools, and to cooperate with one another, at least. Isn't it obvious that intelligence is an extraordinarily powerful thing?
    The product doesn't explain the process, Thousand. Our "common ancestor" (what apes and us supposedly branced off from) had ridiculously small brains.
  12. Standard memberDarfius
    The Apologist
    Joined
    22 Dec '04
    Moves
    41172
    31 Mar '05 08:49
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    It depends on what you define "human" as. Homo sapiens sapiens probably evolved from Homo sapiens (archaic) which evolved from Homo erectus.

    http://www.onelife.com/evolve/manev.html
    Biology puts the most likely date for the first modern humans at 50,000 years ago, with a maximum upper limit of 100,000 years ago.

    If Homo sapien (archaic) died out 200,000 years ago, where does that leave us?

    I will remind you that Neanderthals are nearly as distant from us as chimps.

    I'd also like to add that in Genesis, two different words are used for 'make'. The first implies that God molded Adam (using dust) in the shape of something already existing on earth (Neanderthals), and the second implies God created something out of nothing and put it in Adam (soul).

    That would explain the first religious expression which occurred 25,000-50,000 years ago, and was something Neanderthals did not do.
  13. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    West Coast Rioter
    tinyurl.com/y7loem9q
    Joined
    23 Aug '04
    Moves
    24791
    31 Mar '05 09:41
    Originally posted by Darfius
    The product doesn't explain the process, Thousand. Our "common ancestor" (what apes and us supposedly branced off from) had ridiculously small brains.
    "Ridiculously small"? Chimps, our closest relatives, have pretty big brains.

    The process probably involved the ASPM gene. This gene and homologous genes in other organisms has a repetitive structure and there is a correlation between how many times it repeats and how large the nervous system is between species as well as within the Homo sapiens species. When this gene gets shortened, microencephaly is the result.

    http://pharyngula.org/comments/225_0_1_16_C

    There is also a phenomenon called allometry in which mutations in regulatory genes can increase or decrease the rate of growth of part of the body relative to the whole. This explains the differences between the skull shapes of humans, chimps, and baboons; the human's cranium grows much faster than the facial bones compared to the chimp, while the baboon is the opposite. The result is three skulls which are very similar except for the proportions.

    http://pharyngula.org/comments/249_0_1_0_C/

    Now, let's hypothesize a "common ancestor" or CA for chimps and humans. This ancestor would be a tree dwelling ape of some sort. Mutations would provide genetic variability which would give variability to the cranium size and the brain size.

    Some of these apes would continue to live in the forest and would evolve into chimpanzees. Others might be forced out of the forest, or might simply find resources available in nearby plains that there was no ape competition for. These latter apes would succeed if they were adaptable and had the other benefits a larger brain would provide. Natural selection would select for larger brains up to the limit of the skull's volume, and then mutation would provide more genetic variability in cranium size, and those with larger craniums would be able to handle larger brains that would later evolve, etc. Mutation would allow the cranium and brain to increase and decrease in size, and natural selection would allow those with larger brains to thrive, because larger brains provide the benefits that they do.
  14. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    West Coast Rioter
    tinyurl.com/y7loem9q
    Joined
    23 Aug '04
    Moves
    24791
    31 Mar '05 09:42
    Originally posted by Darfius
    Biology puts the [b]most likely date for the first modern humans at 50,000 years ago, with a maximum upper limit of 100,000 years ago.

    If Homo sapien (archaic) died out 200,000 years ago, where does that leave us?

    I will remind you that Neanderthals are nearly as distant from us as chimps.

    I'd also like to add that in Genesis, two different wor ...[text shortened]... us expression which occurred 25,000-50,000 years ago, and was something Neanderthals did not do.[/b]
    Biology puts the [b]most likely date for the first modern humans at 50,000 years ago, with a maximum upper limit of 100,000 years ago.[/b]

    Where are you getting these numbers from? The website I gave the address for claims Homo sapiens sapiens have existed for 200 thousand years.
  15. Standard memberDarfius
    The Apologist
    Joined
    22 Dec '04
    Moves
    41172
    31 Mar '05 09:49
    "Ridiculously small"? Chimps, our closest relatives, have pretty big brains.

    We didn't come from chimps.

    Now, let's hypothesize a "common ancestor" or CA for chimps and humans. This ancestor would be a tree dwelling ape of some sort. Mutations would provide genetic variability which would give variability to the cranium size and the brain size.

    Why would the ancestor be a tree-dweeling ape? Why couldn't it be a plain roaming ape?

    Some of these apes would continue to live in the forest and would evolve into chimpanzees. Others might be forced out of the forest, or might simply find resources available in nearby plains that there was no ape competition for. These latter apes would succeed if they were adaptable and had the other benefits a larger brain would provide. Natural selection would select for larger brains up to the limit of the skull's volume, and then mutation would provide more genetic variability in cranium size, and those with larger craniums would be able to handle larger brains that would later evolve, etc. Mutation would allow the cranium and brain to increase and decrease in size, and natural selection would allow those with larger brains to thrive, because larger brains provide the benefits that they do.

    How exactly would larger brains help a plain dwelling ape rather than a tree dwelling one? I would think the ape would be more concerned with speed than intelligence in the open plains.
Back to Top