1. Standard memberRJHinds
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    08 May '15 07:14
    Which translation is correct?

    Is tasteless food eaten without salt, Or is there flavor in the juice of a mallow?
    (Job 6:6 New World Translation)

    Can that which is unsavoury be eaten without salt? or is there any taste in the white of an egg?
    (Job 6:6 King James Version)

    Or can an unsavoury thing be eaten, that is not seasoned with salt? or can a man taste that which when tasted bringeth death?
    (Job 6:6 Darby Bible Translation)

    Eaten is an insipid thing without salt? Is there sense in the drivel of dreams?
    (Job 6:6 Young's Literal Translation)
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    08 May '15 07:46
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Which translation is correct?

    Is tasteless food eaten without salt, Or is there flavor in the juice of a mallow?
    (Job 6:6 New World Translation)

    Can that which is unsavoury be eaten without salt? or is there any taste in the white of an egg?
    (Job 6:6 King James Version)

    Or can an unsavoury thing be eaten, that is not seasoned with salt? or can a m ...[text shortened]... ing without salt? Is there sense in the drivel of dreams?
    (Job 6:6 Young's Literal Translation)
    MARSHMALLOW

    [Heb., chal·la·muthʹ].

    A perennial plant that is closely related to the hollyhock. The woody stems of the marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) measure up to 1.8 m (6 ft) in height. The plant’s large, wide leaves are notched and terminate in a sharp point. Both the stems and the leaves are covered with soft downy hair. The pale-pink, five-petal flowers are about 5 cm (2 in.) across. In times of famine, the marshmallow’s white carrotlike root has been used for food. The sole Scriptural reference to the marshmallow alludes to its tastelessness.—Job 6:6.

    The Hebrew term chal·la·muthʹ, found only at Job 6:6, has been variously rendered “egg” (AS, KJ), “purslain” (AT), and, as defined in a Hebrew and Aramaic lexicon by L. Koehler and W. Baumgartner, “marsh-mallow” (Lexicon in Veteris Testamenti Libros, Leiden, 1958, p. 304).

    Source : Jehovahs Christian Witnesses, insight on the scriptures, volume 2 p. 345
  3. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    08 May '15 08:17
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Which translation is correct?

    Is tasteless food eaten without salt, Or is there flavor in the juice of a mallow?
    (Job 6:6 New World Translation)

    Can that which is unsavoury be eaten without salt? or is there any taste in the white of an egg?
    (Job 6:6 King James Version)

    Or can an unsavoury thing be eaten, that is not seasoned with salt? or can a m ...[text shortened]... ing without salt? Is there sense in the drivel of dreams?
    (Job 6:6 Young's Literal Translation)
    No translation is ever correct.

    Can you translate the Italian "ciao"
    or the French "couteaux volent bas"

    of course not ... and those languages have not been dead for thousands of years.
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    08 May '15 14:20
    You guys should read Benjamin.
  5. Standard membersonship
    the corrected one.
    Joined
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    08 May '15 15:04
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Which translation is correct?

    Is tasteless food eaten without salt, Or is there flavor in the juice of a mallow?
    (Job 6:6 New World Translation)

    Can that which is unsavoury be eaten without salt? or is there any taste in the white of an egg?
    (Job 6:6 King James Version)

    Or can an unsavoury thing be eaten, that is not seasoned with salt? or can a m ...[text shortened]... ing without salt? Is there sense in the drivel of dreams?
    (Job 6:6 Young's Literal Translation)
    Do any of these versions have anything in the MARGINS or in the footnotes for that verse?

    Responsible English translations often have helpful notes in the margins on difficult passages to translate.
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    the corrected one.
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    08 May '15 15:07
    I don't know what mallow is yet.
    There seem to be a lot of agreement about egg white:

    New International Version
    Is tasteless food eaten without salt, or is there flavor in the sap of the mallow?

    New Living Translation
    Don't people complain about unsalted food? Does anyone want the tasteless white of an egg?

    English Standard Version
    Can that which is tasteless be eaten without salt, or is there any taste in the juice of the mallow?

    New American Standard Bible
    "Can something tasteless be eaten without salt, Or is there any taste in the white of an egg?

    King James Bible
    Can that which is unsavoury be eaten without salt? or is there any taste in the white of an egg?

    Holman Christian Standard Bible
    Is bland food eaten without salt? Is there flavor in an egg white?

    International Standard Version
    Tasteless food isn't eaten without salt, is it? Is there any taste in an egg white?

    NET Bible
    Can food that is tasteless be eaten without salt? Or is there any taste in the white of an egg?

    GOD'S WORD® Translation
    Is tasteless food eaten without salt, or is there any flavor in the white of an egg?

    Jubilee Bible 2000
    Can that which is unsavoury be eaten without salt? Or is there any taste in the white of an egg?
  7. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
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    08 May '15 15:12
    A more recent translation had the footnote:

    'Too much salt can raise your blood pressure, which puts you at increased risk of health problems such as heart disease and stroke.'
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    the corrected one.
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    08 May '15 17:381 edit
    Originally posted by Ghost of a Duke
    A more recent translation had the footnote:

    'Too much salt can raise your blood pressure, which puts you at increased risk of health problems such as heart disease and stroke.'
    Conspiracy! Conspiracy!
    They just want people to flock to the Whole Foods Store to get their money.
  9. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
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    08 May '15 18:48
    Originally posted by sonship
    Conspiracy! Conspiracy!
    They just want people to flock to the Whole Foods Store to get their money.
    🙂 As a species though, we do need to cut down on the salt.
  10. Standard memberRJHinds
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    09 May '15 06:082 edits
    Pulpit Commentary:
    Or is there any taste in the white of an egg? So our Revisers; and so Dillmann and Canon Cook. Professor Lee suggests "the whey of cheese" for "the white of an egg;" others, "the juice of purslaine." We have certainly no other evidence that eggs were eaten in primitive times.

    Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible:
    Mr. Broughton renders it, "the white of the yolk"; and Kimchi says it signifies, in the language of the Rabbins, the red part of the yolk, the innermost part; but others, from the use of the word in the Arabic language, interpret it of the froth of milk, which is very tasteless and insipid: but the first of the words we render "white" always signifies "spittle"; and some of the Jewish writers call it the spittle of soundness, or a sound man, which has no taste, in distinction from that of a sick man, which has; and the latter word comes from one which signifies to dream; and Jarchi observes, that some so understand it here; and the whole is by some rendered, "is there any taste" or "savour in the spittle of a dream" or "drowsiness"?

    Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary:
    the white—literally, "spittle" (1Sa 21:13), which the white of an egg resembles.

    Barnes' Notes on the Bible:
    Critics and commentators have been greatly divided about the meaning of this. The Septuagint renders it, is there any taste in vain words? Jerome (Vulgate), "can anyone taste that which being tasted produces death?" The Targums render it substantially as it is in our version. The Hebrew word rendered "white" means properly spittle; 1 Samuel 21:13. If applied to an egg, it means the white of it, as resembling spittle. The word rendered "egg" occurs nowhere else in the Scriptures. If it be regarded as derived from -- to sleep, or dream, it may denote somnolency or dreams, and then fatuity, folly, or a foolish speech, as resembling dreams; and many have supposed that Job meant to characterize the speech of Eliphaz as of this description.

    The word may mean, as it does in Syriac, a species of herb, the "purslain" (Gesenius), proverbial for its insipidity among the Arabs, Greeks, and Romans, but which was used as a salad; and the whole phrase here may denote purslain-broth, and hence, an insipid discourse. This is the interpretation of Gesenius. But the more common and more probable explanation is that of our common version, denoting the white of an egg.

    But what is the point of the remark as Job uses it? That it is a proverbial expression, is apparent; but in what way Job meant to apply it, is not so clear. The Jews say that he meant to apply it to the speech of Eliphaz as being insipid and dull, without anything to penetrate the heart or to enliven the fancy; a speech as disagreeable to the mind as the white of an egg was insipid to the taste. Rosenmuller supposes that he refers to his afflictions as being as unpleasant to bear as the white of an egg was to the taste. It seems to me that the sense of all the proverbs used here is about the same, and that they mean, "there is a reason for everything which occurs. The ass brays and the ox lows only when destitute of food. That which is insipid is unpleasant, and the white of an egg is loathsome. So with my afflictions. They produce loathing and disgust, My very food Job 6:7 is disagreeable, and everything seems tasteless as the most insipid food would.

    http://biblehub.com/job/6-6.htm
  11. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
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    09 May '15 07:06
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    [b]Which translation is correct?

    Is tasteless food eaten without salt, Or is there flavor in the juice of a mallow?
    (Job 6:6 New World Translation)
    Hang on, what's with this biblical fixation on salt?

    “Salt is good”, Luke 14:34

    And in Genesis 19 Lot's wife even becomes a pillar of salt (after she looked back at Sodom).

    Should the bible come with a health warning?!?
  12. Standard memberRJHinds
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    10 May '15 06:011 edit
    Originally posted by Ghost of a Duke
    Hang on, what's with this biblical fixation on salt?

    “Salt is good”, Luke 14:34

    And in Genesis 19 Lot's wife even becomes a pillar of salt (after she looked back at Sodom).

    Should the bible come with a health warning?!?
    Why not put this good salt up your British English ass? 😏
  13. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
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    10 May '15 07:12
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Why not put this good salt up your British English ass? 😏
    Sigh.

    Was going to give a good chemistry joke in response; but alas, all the best ones argon.
  14. SubscriberSuzianne
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    10 May '15 10:36
    Originally posted by Ghost of a Duke
    Hang on, what's with this biblical fixation on salt?

    “Salt is good”, Luke 14:34

    And in Genesis 19 Lot's wife even becomes a pillar of salt (after she looked back at Sodom).

    Should the bible come with a health warning?!?
    Salt was revered even in antiquity. Our word "salary" has the Latin for salt at its root..
  15. SubscriberSuzianne
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    10 May '15 10:36
    Originally posted by Ghost of a Duke
    Sigh.

    Was going to give a good chemistry joke in response; but alas, all the best ones argon.
    lol... I love a good pun.
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