1. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
    That's Why I Drink
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    31 Jul '09 11:49
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/teams/c/chelsea/8178248.stm

    Adrian Mutu must pay Chelsea £14.65m after losing his appeal against a Fifa ruling for a breach of contract.

    The striker, who cost the Blues £15m in 2003, was sacked a year later after he tested positive for cocaine and given a seven-month worldwide football ban.


    So, guys, what do you think?

    If a club disburses lots of cash for a player, and then the player gets himself banned for doing drugs, then it causes damage to the club and hence it has to pay for it.

    I really think it's a good message for players to walk straight. Even if this is in benefit of the clubs, I am happy for the kids, because the young chaps admire those lucky, lucky guys who are called "professional footbal players".
  2. Joined
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    31 Jul '09 17:45
    Originally posted by Seitse
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/teams/c/chelsea/8178248.stm

    Adrian Mutu must pay Chelsea £14.65m after losing his appeal against a Fifa ruling for a breach of contract.

    The striker, who cost the Blues £15m in 2003, was sacked a year later after he tested positive for cocaine and given a seven-month worldwide football ban.


    So, guys, w ...[text shortened]... the young chaps admire those lucky, lucky guys who are called "professional footbal players".
    Yours is the voice or reason seitse. Any athlete banned for behavior problems of any kind needs to pay back the club the money he's been advanced like in any breach of contract dispute. Seems to work in all other fields of commerce. Athlete's argumetns that they did not aske to be role models for youth has never held water. Kids look up to them regardless. WE have way too many wealthy athletes behaving like fools then whine after being sacked. How about my hero David Ortiz and steroids, Manny Rmz. is an idiot but a moster player, suspended how many games? the message of drug abuse is OK whether performance or mind altering is a grave message to send our youth.
  3. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    31 Jul '09 19:061 edit
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Yours is the voice or reason seitse. Any athlete banned for behavior problems of any kind needs to pay back the club the money he's been advanced like in any breach of contract dispute. Seems to work in all other fields of commerce. Athlete's argumetns that they did not aske to be role models for youth has never held water. Kids look up to them regardle ...[text shortened]... of drug abuse is OK whether performance or mind altering is a grave message to send our youth.
    Bullseye.

    I hope events like this shift the stereotypical athlete-entertainer ( fame comes for talent on the pitch despite lack of education, money and women and false friends and fun pour in overnight, turning the kid crazy and then the end comes with the player 40+, divorced, friendless, penniless in the streets ) into a socially responsible professional who understands that career is short, so he works hard and surrounds himself with family and supporting professionals.

    It happened/still is happening to many great ones: drugs, dog fighting, skirts, scandals, etc.

    Man, it happened to my favorite boxer, "Spikes" Olivares, a true gladiator of the ring who piled up dollars for many years. Now he sells his autographs 5 dollars a piece, smelling of booze.
  4. Joined
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    31 Jul '09 19:46
    Originally posted by Seitse
    Bullseye.

    I hope events like this shift the stereotypical athlete-entertainer ( fame comes for talent on the pitch despite lack of education, money and women and false friends and fun pour in overnight, turning the kid crazy and then the end comes with the player 40+, divorced, friendless, penniless in the streets ) into a socially responsible profe ...[text shortened]... d up dollars for many years. Now he sells his autographs 5 dollars a piece, smelling of booze.
    Two great examples of propriety John Elway, Troy Aickman. well behaved, have invested their money wisely and do not seem to be womanizers, dog fighters, etc. Coach of the 49rs is another notable example. Some have misbehaved in the past and righted their lives: Magic Jonhson. One of the most tragic footballers was Gaetano Scirea who died speeding on the autostrada in his Lamborghini doing 18o miles/hr. I feel teams need a shrink on staff, preferably into athletics, to counsel these young, impulsive players. Cristiano Ronaldo had a bad accident in a sports car. Totaled his Lamborghini. If no shrink then place a freakin governor on their accelerators, a little clamp on their urethra activated by ovulation detection so they don't sneak one past the goalie and .007 alcohol detector connected to their erectyle mechanism so they cannot fornicate while drunk.

    I loved Olivares. Not as a model but as a fighter. Perhaps they should hire a monk to handle their finances so they don't end in the poor house. What a tragic human being he is.
  5. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    31 Jul '09 19:581 edit
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Two great examples of propriety John Elway, Troy Aickman. well behaved, have invested their money wisely and do not seem to be womanizers, dog fighters, etc. Coach of the 49rs is another notable example. Some have misbehaved in the past and righted their lives: Magic Jonhson. One of the most tragic footballers was Gaetano Scirea who died speeding on the to handle their finances so they don't end in the poor house. What a tragic human being he is.
    Elway & Aickman played it good indeed.

    Another of my favs is Frank Ribéry, at least so far. The guy is almost as good as Ronaldo if not the same, and he is a ghetto French boy who married his puppy love. No drinks, no drugs, no scandals. From home to the pitch and back, and is low profile, speaking on the pitch only. I wish Real Madrid would have put those 90 kilos on him rather than on Cristiano Ronaldo.

    Yup, because Ronaldo will go down if he doesn't snap up and focus. I am worried that Madrid's nightlife, superior 1000 times to Manchester's, finishes with his amazing talent.

    Check this fight... man, for a right handed fighter, he had a real brick in the left knuckle. Oh, he could be coaching and inspiring kids today if it was not for the booze...

    YouTube

    Sad.
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    31 Jul '09 21:38
    Mano de Piedra Duran was the complete opposite. Too bad he killed himself. Mexico has had tons of great boxing champions. My personal favorite was Mantequilla Napoles, although not Mexican by birth. Always an entertaining fighter.

    Ribery is truly one of the greatest players of all time. In his prime he had few equals none better. He is the real reason behind the triumph in 98, not headbutter dope. That was one great team, though since Ribery did not do it alone. I have never really cared for Brazil, greatness not withstanding. I see them as the Yankees of footie. That's why I was cheering loudly when France beat the crap out of them in the final! Then when France eliminated them again in 06 that was icing on the cake.
  7. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    01 Aug '09 11:10
    For an American you happen to know a lot about Mexican fighters.

    'Pipino' Cuevas is my all time favorite, together with Salvador Sánchez.

    Mantequilla is a blast, indeed. Last I heard the man lived humbly but sufficiently, and he was teaching kids in a gym. I was happy to hear he's doing relatively well and is passing his knowledge and experience to new generations.

    Boxing is right now, in my humble opinion, orphan from the passion and quality that we enjoyed before. Remember when one counted the days to see Tommy Hearns, Manos de Piedra, Macho Camacho, Marvin Haggler, et.al. climb into a ring?

    Man, now it's kind of a freak show with Valuevs and the like.
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    01 Aug '09 13:53
    I used to be a huge boxing fan, but the sport became a freak show. Napoles was wolrd famous, so was Olivares. Indeed we would all wait anxiously for the big fights. Mexico dominated in the lower weight categories. Pipino Cuevas was an all time great. I also enjoyed boxers from around the world like Nino Benvenuti, Billy Bacchus, the great Thai fighters, the Japanese and Philipino, etc. How did a great sport get coopted by the likes of ear biter dude and comapny?
  9. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
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    01 Aug '09 16:39
    What do you think of Paquiao?
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    01 Aug '09 18:51
    Originally posted by Seitse
    What do you think of Paquiao?
    Very entertaining, but more of a showman than the real fighters of the past. I prefer real men to clowns. Remeber Carlos Monzon? Now there's a man's man. Tragic death, though, but in the ring he was a real monster.
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    02 Aug '09 01:38
    Originally posted by Seitse
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/teams/c/chelsea/8178248.stm

    Adrian Mutu must pay Chelsea £14.65m after losing his appeal against a Fifa ruling for a breach of contract.

    The striker, who cost the Blues £15m in 2003, was sacked a year later after he tested positive for cocaine and given a seven-month worldwide football ban.


    So, guys, w ...[text shortened]... the young chaps admire those lucky, lucky guys who are called "professional footbal players".
    i think it's very harsh.
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    02 Aug '09 15:31
    Originally posted by trev33
    i think it's very harsh.
    Of course you would find it harsh, you apologist for bad behavior! Enough is enough with these prima donna players. They want the money without any responsibility. These players are killing the golden egg hen big time!
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    02 Aug '09 15:55
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Of course you would find it harsh, you apologist for bad behavior! Enough is enough with these prima donna players. They want the money without any responsibility. These players are killing the golden egg hen big time!
    'bad behavior' depends what you think that is i guess, last time i checked coke doesn't enhance an athlete's performance. what is the difference between a footballer going out for a night and dabbling in coke and a musician who's an addict or even just a regular 9-5 person trying coke?

    a 7 month ban was harsh, getting sacked was over the top and this 14m fine is just ridiculas.
    think of it at mutu's perspective, he's out for a night and is offered said substance, how many of us have went through our lives without saying yes at some point to something we probably shouldn't have?

    it's a joke.

    look at baseball, manny got 50 days for something that enhances his performance, mutu gets 7 months and an 14m fine for a recreational drug. doesn't seem fair does it?
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    02 Aug '09 16:16
    Originally posted by trev33
    'bad behavior' depends what you think that is i guess, last time i checked coke doesn't enhance an athlete's performance. what is the difference between a footballer going out for a night and dabbling in coke and a musician who's an addict or even just a regular 9-5 person trying coke?

    a 7 month ban was harsh, getting sacked was over the top and this 14m f ...[text shortened]... mutu gets 7 months and an 14m fine for a recreational drug. doesn't seem fair does it?
    I guess it depends largely on what might have been in hihs contract. If he had a no coke clause he probably had a history of drug use. Think of fairness from the club's perspective. The club may have signed him conditionally based on "no drugs". I firmly belive it is high time to place simialr clauses in all athletes' contracts. We may even end up saving an athlete's life here or there. From your vantage point ineed it seems harsh, but comparing it to Manny Rmz is apples and oranges. Different sports, diferent governing bodies, different contracts. Musicians are a whole different world. I disapprove of all these bad behaviors. Look at the life expectancy of first tier musicians. They seem to die quite young, relatively speaking. Party hard types simply seem to wear out. 9-5 types don't seem to keep their jobs either after getting drug tested at work.
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    02 Aug '09 16:34
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    I guess it depends largely on what might have been in hihs contract. If he had a no coke clause he probably had a history of drug use. Think of fairness from the club's perspective. The club may have signed him conditionally based on "no drugs". I firmly belive it is high time to place simialr clauses in all athletes' contracts. We may even end up savin ...[text shortened]... ear out. 9-5 types don't seem to keep their jobs either after getting drug tested at work.
    well it's true we don't know what's in his contract.
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