1. Standard memberRed Night
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    30 Oct '07 18:05
    Having watched a portion of the Rugby Cup finals, I have a lot of questions.

    1. How come there were so few black players?
  2. Standard memberRed Night
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    30 Oct '07 18:06
    2. Many of the players looked old - mid 30's+

    Are they really that old?

    Do they use steroids?
  3. Standard memberRed Night
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    30 Oct '07 18:06
    3. Are you allowed to drop-kick a field goal or are you only allowed to kick one off of the tee?

    What do you call a field goal in rugby?
  4. Standard memberRed Night
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    30 Oct '07 18:08
    4. Why don't they run around end more?

    It would seem like a couple of big fast players could run the option around end and once they were by that first line they would go for a touch down.

    You call touchdowns tries, right?
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    30 Oct '07 18:271 edit
    1. The reason is probably different in different countries. In England, I think it's because rugby has traditionally been a middle/upper class sport, unlike, say, football.

    2. England had one of the older squads in the competition, I think. About half their squad was over 30. The oldest player (Mike Catt) was 36. The youngest was 23. There are quite a few talented young players around who weren't picked because of lack of experience.

    The sport does have drug testing. If they use steroids they haven't been caught yet!

    3. You can drop-kick (it's called a drop-goal) from open play. Kicks 'off the tee' are only used for a penalty or a conversion (after a try is scored).

    4. If it was that easy they'd do it more often! The opposition's fastest players are likely to be defending out on the edges.
  6. Standard memberRed Night
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    30 Oct '07 18:30
    Originally posted by mtthw
    1. The reason is probably different in different countries. In England, I think it's because rugby has traditionally been a middle/upper class sport.

    2. England had one of the older squads in the competition, I think. About half their squad was over 30. The oldest player (Mike Catt) was 36. The youngest was 23.

    The sport does have drug testing. If t ...[text shortened]... ore often! The opposition's fastest players are likely to be defending out on the edges.
    Thanks mtthw.

    I didn't see any drop-goals attempted. I only saw the second half. In australian rules they used to do that often. Is it common in rugby?

    I figured out that you can't block. Can you knock the guy over when you are running? Can you use your arms to push him away?
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    30 Oct '07 18:381 edit
    Originally posted by Red Night
    Thanks mtthw.

    I didn't see any drop-goals attempted. I only saw the second half. In australian rules they used to do that often. Is it common in rugby?

    I figured out that you can't block. Can you knock the guy over when you are running? Can you use your arms to push him away?
    Some teams try drop-goals more often than others. But tries are worth more, so teams only tend to go for them when they have a good position but aren't making any further progress.

    You mean can the player with the ball push tacklers away? Yes, it's called a 'hand-off' I think there are restrictions on exactly what you're allowed to do, but I'm not sure of the detail.
  8. Standard memberRed Night
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    30 Oct '07 19:01
    Originally posted by mtthw
    Some teams try drop-goals more often than others. But tries are worth more, so teams only tend to go for them when they have a good position but aren't making any further progress.

    You mean can the player with the ball push tacklers away? Yes, it's called a 'hand-off' I think there are restrictions on exactly what you're allowed to do, but I'm not sure of the detail.
    Tries = 6

    drop goals = 3

    ???
  9. Standard memberRed Night
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    30 Oct '07 19:021 edit
    5. Why do they put the ball so often?

    Can they punt it to their own player? (I think I used to see that in Australian rules.)
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    30 Oct '07 20:29
    It really is different to watch and it is confusing the names that are used. For instance Rugby calling a stiff arm a Hand off and NFL rules a Hand off would be actually handing the ball off to another player. So I guess, once you get all that stuff down Rugyby is pretty cool to watch.

    I have Question too.

    What is going on when both teams are hugging each other in a big circle and sort of dancing around in that circle all bent over. I haven't quite figured that out yet.
  11. Standard memberCrowley
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    30 Oct '07 20:51
    Originally posted by mtthw
    it's called a 'hand-off' I think there are restrictions on exactly what you're allowed to do, but I'm not sure of the detail.
    I believe the rules state you can't use a fist or make a hitting or swinging motion.
    You basically have to use the palm of your hand and can't look like you're taking a shot at the opposing player.
  12. Standard memberRed Night
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    30 Oct '07 20:52
    Originally posted by Crowley
    I believe the rules state you can't use a fist or make a hitting or swinging motion.
    You basically have to use the palm of your hand and can't look like you're taking a shot at the opposing player.
    that is pretty much the same rule as american football.
  13. Standard memberCrowley
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    30 Oct '07 20:57
    Originally posted by Red Night
    5. Why do they put the ball so often?

    Can they punt it to their own player? (I think I used to see that in Australian rules.)
    If you only saw the last few games of the world cup - you saw the more boring, kicking games.

    Usually the ball isn't kicked so much in games - it is usually just used to relieve pressure, but you are surrendering possession if you kick the ball out.
    The 'punt' kicks you are referring to are called 'up-and-unders' or 'Gary Owens'. When a player gets a ball far behind his support, he will sometimes put up a high ball and put pressure on the guy fielding it in the hope of getting possession back.

    Also, tries are worth 5 points (if you convert the try you get 2 extra points), drop goals and converted penalties are worth 3.
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    30 Oct '07 22:401 edit
    Originally posted by Red Night
    Can they punt it to their own player? (I think I used to see that in Australian rules.)
    The off-side rule means that if the ball is kicked forward it can't be played directly by anyone in front of the kicker. So yes you can, but with limitations.

    You'll occasionally see a cross-field kick for a runner on the other side of the kick. It's quite a common tactic in rugby league, which seems to have recently caught on in rugby union.

    You'll also sometimes see the kicker chip the ball over a defender with the intention to run past him and catch it again.
  15. Standard memberRed Night
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    30 Oct '07 23:03
    Originally posted by mtthw
    The off-side rule means that if the ball is kicked forward it can't be played directly by anyone in front of the kicker. So yes you can, but with limitations.

    You'll occasionally see a cross-field kick for a runner on the other side of the kick. It's quite a common tactic in rugby league, which seems to have recently caught on in rugby union.

    You'll al ...[text shortened]... kicker chip the ball over a defender with the intention to run past him and catch it again.
    Thanks again.

    Can you answer Cash's question about the scrum?

    I'm curious about that as well.

    And why do the guys seem to dive back into the pile when they pick up the ball, wouldn't it make more sense to try to run around the ends?
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