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Culture Forum

  1. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    29 Sep '12 01:31 / 3 edits
    Differences Between American and British Humour


    http://ideas.time.com/2011/11/09/the-difference-between-american-and-british-humour/

    Care to weigh in, Mate... perhaps with a spot of tea and scone or biscuit?


  2. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    29 Sep '12 12:39
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    [b]Differences Between American and British Humour


    http://ideas.time.com/2011/11/09/the-difference-between-american-and-british-humour/

    Care to weigh in, Mate... perhaps with a spot of tea and scone or biscuit?


    [/b]
    Ricky Gervais is just not funny, so I wouldn't waste my time on his opinions!

    -m.
  3. 30 Sep '12 14:24
    Originally posted by mikelom
    Ricky Gervais is just not funny, so I wouldn't waste my time on his opinions!
    Particularly when he says that he (and this is a quote from the article ): "I never actively try to offend." He's either lying or really, really stupid - and from what I've seen of him, in and out of character, probably both.
    Ricky Gervais is almost the lowest of the low of British humour. Below him you find only the likes of Borat and Frank Spencer. Even Benny Hill is his superior.

    Now if one of the Pythons (yes, including the USAnian one) wrote that article, or Rowan Atkinson, or Jeremy Lloyd, I'd listen. They have a right to talk. Each of those has more sense of humour in his left pinkie toenail than Ricky Gervais has in his entire oeuvre.

    Richard
  4. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    30 Sep '12 18:48
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    Particularly when he says that he (and this is a quote from the article ): "I never actively try to offend." He's either lying or really, really stupid - and from what I've seen of him, in and out of character, probably both.
    Ricky Gervais is almost the lowest of the low of British humour. Below him you find only the likes of Borat and Frank Spencer. E ...[text shortened]... f humour in his left pinkie toenail than Ricky Gervais has in his entire oeuvre.

    Richard
    My bad.


  5. 01 Oct '12 14:48
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    Particularly when he says that he (and this is a quote from the article ): "I never actively try to offend." He's either lying or really, really stupid - and from what I've seen of him, in and out of character, probably both.
    Ricky Gervais is almost the lowest of the low of British humour. Below him you find only the likes of Borat and Frank Spencer. E ...[text shortened]... f humour in his left pinkie toenail than Ricky Gervais has in his entire oeuvre.

    Richard
    How could you possibly call him the lowest of the low? There have been hundreds of crap tv sitcoms and terrible comedians that offer nothing of value. Despite if you think Gervais is is offensive or not, or how funny you think he is or isnt. Its hard to question the quality of the office, even if its not your cup of tea its still possible to understand its qualities. His stand-up videos were also pretty good, not genius or amazing, but they had merit. His Flanimal childrens books have also been very popular, the movie he wrote and directed Cemetery Junction was okay, as too was The Invention of Lying. Maybe you do find in offensive, but you can hardly say he's one of the worst british comedians.

    As for the Rowan Atkinson, great comedy actor, but not exactly good when it comes to writing comedy.
  6. 01 Oct '12 20:20
    Originally posted by stellspalfie
    How could you possibly call him the lowest of the low? There have been hundreds of crap tv sitcoms and terrible comedians that offer nothing of value. Despite if you think Gervais is is offensive or not, or how funny you think he is or isnt. Its hard to question the quality of the office, even if its not your cup of tea its still possible to understand ...[text shortened]... r the Rowan Atkinson, great comedy actor, but not exactly good when it comes to writing comedy.
    the not the nine o'clock news sketch with the gorilla being interviewed is classic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beCYGm1vMJ0
  7. 02 Oct '12 08:45
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    the not the nine o'clock news sketch with the gorilla being interviewed is classic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beCYGm1vMJ0
    atkinson didnt write 'not the 9 o'clock news'. although fondly remembered because of some classic scenes, the majority of that show was pretty bad.

    remember for every black adder, he has a thin blue line or mr bean or those crappy bond parody movies.
  8. Subscriber Kewpie
    since 1-Feb-07
    02 Oct '12 12:25
    As a neutral in this, I immediately thought of Monty Python, Fawlty Towers, Steptoe & Son, Alf Garnett, Dave Allen, the Two Ronnies, and of course the originals - Spike Milligan, Harry Seccombe and Peter Sellers. Couldn't think of a single American, not one that I thought was funny anyway. Sorry.
  9. 02 Oct '12 13:44
    The main difference is that British humour is good and American humour doesn't exist, or is only unintentionally funny like in The Room or Twilight.
  10. 02 Oct '12 16:17
    Originally posted by Kewpie
    As a neutral in this, I immediately thought of Monty Python, Fawlty Towers, Steptoe & Son, Alf Garnett, Dave Allen, the Two Ronnies, and of course the originals - Spike Milligan, Harry Seccombe and Peter Sellers. Couldn't think of a single American, not one that I thought was funny anyway. Sorry.
    I would add the English "Keeping Up Appearances" with Hyacinth Bucket as one of the funniest programmes ever.
  11. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    02 Oct '12 20:28
    Originally posted by lolof
    I would add the English "Keeping Up Appearances" with Hyacinth Bucket as one of the funniest programmes ever.
    My Mom loved it. So do I.
  12. 02 Oct '12 21:44
    Originally posted by lolof
    I would add the English "Keeping Up Appearances" with Hyacinth Bucket as one of the funniest programmes ever.
    nooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!! all the great and average humor we have given the world and you name that pile of ********


    ive calmed down....sorry for the outburst, i guess humor is subjective...noooooooooooooooo!!!!!! it was bloody terrible!!!!!!
  13. Subscriber Proper Knob
    Cornovii
    02 Oct '12 22:03
    Originally posted by stellspalfie
    How could you possibly call him the lowest of the low? There have been hundreds of crap tv sitcoms and terrible comedians that offer nothing of value. Despite if you think Gervais is is offensive or not, or how funny you think he is or isnt. Its hard to question the quality of the office, even if its not your cup of tea its still possible to understand ...[text shortened]... r the Rowan Atkinson, great comedy actor, but not exactly good when it comes to writing comedy.
    How could you possibly call him the lowest of the low?

    He's Dutch.
  14. 03 Oct '12 06:15
    Originally posted by stellspalfie
    nooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!! all the great and average humor we have given the world and you name that pile of ********


    ive calmed down....sorry for the outburst, i guess humor is subjective...noooooooooooooooo!!!!!! it was bloody terrible!!!!!!
    I think it was very well received here in Sweden, and mostly thanks to Patricia Routledge who won a British Comedy Award in 1991 for her role as Hyacinth Bucket. And Patricia Routledge is the reason why I love it so much.
  15. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    03 Oct '12 11:59 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Kewpie
    As a neutral in this, I immediately thought of Monty Python, Fawlty Towers, Steptoe & Son, Alf Garnett, Dave Allen, the Two Ronnies, and of course the originals - Spike Milligan, Harry Seccombe and Peter Sellers. Couldn't think of a single American, not one that I thought was funny anyway. Sorry.
    The U.K. has plenty of overlooked or underestimated gems. A few that come to mind are A Fairly Secret Army, Bob Martin (with Michael Barrymore), Red Dwarf. Did the two Alan Partridge series (when he was in the motel and then in the caravan) make any impact outside the U.K.?

    I enjoyed The New Statesman [with Rik Mayall] when it came out in the late 80s but it did not really hold up well when I revisited it a couple of years ago.

    Then there was the top notch Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister. And the long running Only Fools And Horses.

    More recently, I quite liked the old school style sitcom of The IT Crowd, the oddness of Peepshow, and the acquired taste of The League Of Gentlemen.