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Culture Forum

  1. 11 Apr '08 00:55
    is there a way to make your voice higher? if so, how? does it take a long time to manually change your voice if it is at all possible?
  2. Standard member Iron Monkey
    Primal Primate
    11 Apr '08 03:21 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by EcstremeVenom
    is there a way to make your voice higher? if so, how? does it take a long time to manually change your voice if it is at all possible?
    whoops! i thought i was in the GF. reply withdrawn.
  3. Standard member Nemesio
    Ursulakantor
    11 Apr '08 03:27 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by EcstremeVenom
    is there a way to make your voice higher? if so, how? does it take a long time to manually change your voice if it is at all possible?
    Yes. The vocal folds are merely muscles. Like any other muscle, exercising them gives them
    greater elasticity. Now, those muscles are situated in your larynx which is a fixed structure,
    the architecture of which contributes to define the sort of sound you will have, but that fundamental
    sound can be modified by your soft palate and embouchure. That's why a tenor singing a note
    sounds different from a bass singing the same note -- their individual apparatus affects the
    timbre of the sound coming out of their mouth, which they enhance through vocal control.

    Now, if you're talking about singing, the way to do this is merely exercise: scales, sirens and
    so forth. If you're talking about speaking, you will not only need to change the absolute pitch
    that you speak in, but also alter how you form your words with your mouth and palate, otherwise
    you'll just sound like your speaking funny. Because speaking is rather a subconscious activity,
    learned since before you had an active memory, it would require lots of discipline to alter
    the fundamental sound of your voice.

    Nemesio
  4. Standard member eldragonfly
    leperchaun messiah
    11 Apr '08 04:13
    Thanks.
  5. Standard member Rapidfyre
    OK SORRY
    11 Apr '08 12:30
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    Yes. The vocal folds are merely muscles. Like any other muscle, exercising them gives them
    greater elasticity. Now, those muscles are situated in your larynx which is a fixed structure,
    the architecture of which contributes to define the sort of sound you will have, but that fundamental
    sound can be modified by your soft palate and embouchure. That's ...[text shortened]... t would require lots of discipline to alter
    the fundamental sound of your voice.

    Nemesio
    Can you say that in english?
  6. 11 Apr '08 17:33
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    Yes. The vocal folds are merely muscles. Like any other muscle, exercising them gives them
    greater elasticity. Now, those muscles are situated in your larynx which is a fixed structure,
    the architecture of which contributes to define the sort of sound you will have, but that fundamental
    sound can be modified by your soft palate and embouchure. That's ...[text shortened]... t would require lots of discipline to alter
    the fundamental sound of your voice.

    Nemesio
    i heard that just merely singing louder, you can hit higher notes. is this true? because i have a pretty high pitched voice just when i talk but when i sing its not that high
  7. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    11 Apr '08 17:43
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    Yes. The vocal folds are merely muscles. Like any other muscle, exercising them gives them
    greater elasticity. Now, those muscles are situated in your larynx which is a fixed structure,
    the architecture of which contributes to define the sort of sound you will have, but that fundamental
    sound can be modified by your soft palate and embouchure. That's ...[text shortened]... t would require lots of discipline to alter
    the fundamental sound of your voice.

    Nemesio
    heh, I only now noticed that you had posted this way way before I did in the other thread. 🙂
  8. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    11 Apr '08 17:44
    Originally posted by Rapidfyre
    Can you say that in english?
    learning to sign is a matter of daily practice.
  9. Standard member Nemesio
    Ursulakantor
    11 Apr '08 18:05
    Originally posted by Rapidfyre
    Can you say that in english?
    Get a dictionary and an anatomical picture of the throat and work your way through the post.
    If you have a genuine interest in the topic, then you'll have to study it such that you can read
    a post like mine.

    Nemesio
  10. Standard member Nemesio
    Ursulakantor
    11 Apr '08 18:13 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by EcstremeVenom
    i heard that just merely singing louder, you can hit higher notes. is this true? because i have a pretty high pitched voice just when i talk but when i sing its not that high
    Singing softer is harder than singing louder because it requires greater control of the flow of
    air through your voice box. Consequently, people will tend to sing high notes too loudly because
    they haven't learned to confine the exhaled air as efficiently. However, invariably, the sound
    of people who are oversinging in this fashion is harsh and forced.

    It may seem like you have high-pitched speaking voice, but pitch-wise it's probably relatively
    normal. The highest male speaking voice that sounds relatively normal is around Middle C,
    the lowest can be well over an octave below that. Personally, I tend to speak at the bottom of my
    register (I'm a low tenor or high baritone), speaking around Bass B (an octave and a note below
    Middle C). But the lowest note I can sing with any presence is the A-flat below that (and I can
    sing a very fuzzy G-flat below that). But I can comfortably sing an F or F-sharp above middle C,
    and can do a note above that when I need to, and my falsetto extends up to the G above the
    Treble staff (although that high sounds pretty unpleasant -- I can sing nicely up to C above
    middle C in falsetto).

    So, odds are that you really aren't speaking all that high relative to singing, only relative to
    other speaking voices.

    Nemesio
  11. Donation kirksey957
    Outkast
    11 Apr '08 23:20
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    Singing softer is harder than singing louder because it requires greater control of the flow of
    air through your voice box. Consequently, people will tend to sing high notes too loudly because
    they haven't learned to confine the exhaled air as efficiently. However, invariably, the sound
    of people who are oversinging in this fashion is harsh and forced. ...[text shortened]... ll that high relative to singing, only relative to
    other speaking voices.

    Nemesio
    This is helpful.

    YouTube
  12. Standard member Nemesio
    Ursulakantor
    12 Apr '08 04:25
    Originally posted by kirksey957
    This is helpful.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2YgrPBTRjMk
    I disagree with him entirely. I've heard many male altos who could belt in falsetto. It's just
    a different character. Generally, men who have very high tenor ranges tend to have puny
    falsettos (though I'm not entirely sure why this is the case). Similarly, most excellent male
    altos I've heard tend to have very pleasant (if not particularly extraordinary) baritone voices.

    Oberlin was a very important musical figure of his time, but he was a product of his time, with
    a vocal character that I find (and many find) very tiresome these days.

    Nemesio
  13. Standard member Iron Monkey
    Primal Primate
    12 Apr '08 05:35
    Originally posted by wormwood
    learning to sign is a matter of daily practice.
    that's great news for the deaf.
  14. 13 Apr '08 19:50
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    Singing softer is harder than singing louder because it requires greater control of the flow of
    air through your voice box. Consequently, people will tend to sing high notes too loudly because
    they haven't learned to confine the exhaled air as efficiently. However, invariably, the sound
    of people who are oversinging in this fashion is harsh and forced. ...[text shortened]... ll that high relative to singing, only relative to
    other speaking voices.

    Nemesio
    that makes a lot of sense; a lot of guys try to sound all tough when they talk but i just talk how i talk.
  15. Standard member eldragonfly
    leperchaun messiah
    22 Apr '08 21:01
    Originally posted by EcstremeVenom
    that makes a lot of sense; a lot of guys try to sound all tough when they talk but i just talk how i talk.
    Good point.