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Culture Forum

  1. 18 Apr '12 19:05 / 1 edit
    This Friday, April 20th, the film “Marley: The Life, Music and Legacy of Bob Marley”, directed by Academy Award winner Kevin MacDonald (who also directed “The last King of Scotland” ) will be showing at select theatres and on VOD. I’m looking forward to seeing it; have been a Marley fan for some time now. Anybody else here plan on seeing it?
  2. 25 Apr '12 10:36 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by vistesd
    This Friday, April 20th, the film “Marley: The Life, Music and Legacy of Bob Marley”, directed by Academy Award winner Kevin MacDonald (who also directed “The last King of Scotland” ) will be showing at select theatres and on VOD. I’m looking forward to seeing it; have been a Marley fan for some time now. Anybody else here plan on seeing it?
    Mmm i never liked 'The last king of Scotland', in fact i gave up half way through it,
    hopefully this will be better, always a Marley fan from long time.
  3. Subscriber karoly aczel
    Fortnite Kid
    05 May '12 04:43 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by vistesd
    This Friday, April 20th, the film “Marley: The Life, Music and Legacy of Bob Marley”, directed by Academy Award winner Kevin MacDonald (who also directed “The last King of Scotland” ) will be showing at select theatres and on VOD. I’m looking forward to seeing it; have been a Marley fan for some time now. Anybody else here plan on seeing it?
    Awesome. Another good film to look forward to. that would make it 2, along with "Hugo" this year, which I have yet to see as well. I wonder how long the time-slip is going to be on this one? (you never know how long it's going to take to get that movie to australia ).

    So it's true that he dies from neglecting a foot injury that he sustained playing (world) football? that the injury turned into some kind of cancer or something?

    I remember when I was young that older folk used to speculate on how Bob Marley died to where they had settled on that " he got cancer from smoking too much pot" ,type line where I grew up with a mostly negative image of Bob Marley.
    Oh how I have done a 180* turn, and now love the man and the music. God bless him.
  4. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    17 May '12 12:40 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    Awesome. Another good film to look forward to. that would make it 2, along with "Hugo" this year, which I have yet to see as well. I wonder how long the time-slip is going to be on this one? (you never know how long it's going to take to get that movie to australia ).

    So it's true that he dies from neglecting a foot injury that he sustained playing ( rley.
    Oh how I have done a 180* turn, and now love the man and the music. God bless him.
    It is one great movie and for Jamaica, Bob Marley was one of the greatest spokesman for the country. I just watched it last night with one of my sons who is a Marley fan.

    I have a couple of his vinyl's. I also have one from Rita Marley, whom I thought was his sister for some reason but she was one of his wives.

    He also snagged a white Jamaican girl who won Ms World somewhere around 1973, a real beauty, still beautiful even now, who was one of those interviewed.

    Yes, he died of cancer probably from the foot injury, he loved football (soccer for US)

    If he had taken care of that injury more aggressively he might still be alive.

    He had 11 children with something like 5 separate women.

    He singlehandedly brought together warring factions of political parties in a concert in which the leaders of both parties came on stage and shook hands with Marley in the middle.

    He probably would have been a shoe in for Prime minister had he lived long enough and was interested.

    He seems to me to be the Jamaican Bob Dylan.
  5. 19 May '12 18:21
    Originally posted by vistesd
    This Friday, April 20th, the film “Marley: The Life, Music and Legacy of Bob Marley”, directed by Academy Award winner Kevin MacDonald (who also directed “The last King of Scotland” ) will be showing at select theatres and on VOD. I’m looking forward to seeing it; have been a Marley fan for some time now. Anybody else here plan on seeing it?
    I enjoy nearlly all genres of music from all over the world, but I confess that I finf reggae dull and repititous. Maybe its the constant same bass logic?
    Could one enjoy the movie without being a fan of the music.

    My favorite song of his isn't even raggae at least to me, Redemption Song.
  6. Subscriber Pianoman1
    Nil desperandum
    20 May '12 06:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by vistesd
    This Friday, April 20th, the film “Marley: The Life, Music and Legacy of Bob Marley”, directed by Academy Award winner Kevin MacDonald (who also directed “The last King of Scotland” ) will be showing at select theatres and on VOD. I’m looking forward to seeing it; have been a Marley fan for some time now. Anybody else here plan on seeing it?
    The man is a legend, a role model for our youth, a man of integrity and love, and a deeply spiritual and thoughtful man who saw the good in everyone, and whose music, in my view ( a classically trained musician) transcends barriers and has so much joy and love in it. Yes, I shall certainly be seeing the film, though I shall probably hanker after the weed that I haven't smoked for some thirty years!
  7. 20 May '12 15:39
    Originally posted by Pianoman1
    The man is a legend, a role model for our youth, a man of integrity and love, and a deeply spiritual and thoughtful man who saw the good in everyone, and whose music, in my view ( a classically trained musician) transcends barriers and has so much joy and love in it. Yes, I shall certainly be seeing the film, though I shall probably hanker after the weed that I haven't smoked for some thirty years!
    Yes, its all about feeling and little about technique.
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    24 May '12 20:58
    Originally posted by badmoon
    Yes, its all about feeling and little about technique.
    I think the crown in his life was getting the two opposition leaders in Jamaica to hold hands on stage at that concert. The symbolism was unmistakable, two white leaders with a half black half white Marley with his hands on both theirs upraised.
  9. 31 May '12 21:11 / 4 edits
    Originally posted by badmoon
    Yes, its all about feeling and little about technique.
    Somewhat agreed, with this caveat:

    Technique always serves the aesthetic intent of the artist, and—although it may be sometimes—is not generally the focus of that aesthetic intent. In elicitive art, such as lyric poetry, the intent is to elicit some feeling, or attitude, or mood, or perhaps some intuitive insight. One does not need to know the formal poetics of Dylan Thomas’ “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night”—i.e., that it is a villanelle—in order for the poem to “do its work”; on the other hand, for those who have some knowledge of poetics, appreciation of the technique itself can also serve the aesthetic response (e.g., the difference between an Italian and a Shakespearian sonnet—the enhanced lyric intensity of the latter). But a cruder technique can also achieve the elicitive intent, especially, I think, in a mixed medium like song.

    On the other other hand, one might read Lorca’s “Theory and Play of the Duende” to get a feel for an artist celebrating an art form (cante jondo / flamenco) in which technique is often seen as getting in the way of the elicitive intent (and which informs his own poetry). An excerpt below—

    _______________________________________________________

    Once, the Andalusian ‘Flamenco singer’ Pastora Pavon, La Niña de Los Peines, sombre Spanish genius, equal in power of fancy to Goya or Rafael el Gallo, was singing in a little tavern in Cadiz. She played with her voice of shadows, with her voice of beaten tin, with her mossy voice, she tangled it in her hair, or soaked it in manzanilla or abandoned it to dark distant briars. But, there was nothing there: it was useless. The audience remained silent.

    In the room was Ignacio Espeleta, handsome as a Roman tortoise, who was once asked: ‘Why don’t you work?’ and who replied with a smile worthy of Argantonius: ‘How should I work, if I’m from Cadiz?’

    In the room was Elvira, fiery aristocrat, whore from Seville, descended in line from Soledad Vargos, who in ’30 didn’t wish to marry with a Rothschild, because he wasn’t her equal in blood. In the room were the Floridas, whom people think are butchers, but who in reality are millennial priests who still sacrifice bulls to Geryon, and in the corner was that formidable breeder of bulls, Don Pablo Murube, with the look of a Cretan mask. Pastora Pavon finished her song in silence. Only, a little man, one of those dancing midgets who leap up suddenly from behind brandy bottles, sarcastically, in a very soft voice, said: ‘Viva, Paris!’ as if to say: ‘Here ability is not important, nor technique, nor skill. What matters here is something other.’

    Then La Niña de Los Peines got up like a madwoman, trembling like a medieval mourner, and drank, in one gulp, a huge glass of fiery spirits, and began to sing with a scorched throat, without voice, breath, colour, but…with [/i]duende[/i]. She managed to tear down the scaffolding of the song, but allow through a furious, burning duende, friend to those winds heavy with sand, that make listeners tear at their clothes with the same rhythm as the Negroes of the Antilles in their rite, huddled before the statue of Santa Bárbara.

    La Niña de Los Peines had to tear apart her voice, because she knew experts were listening, who demanded not form but the marrow of form, pure music with a body lean enough to float on air. She had to rob herself of skill and safety: that is to say, banish her Muse, and be helpless, so her duende might come, and deign to struggle with her at close quarters. And how she sang! Her voice no longer at play, her voice a jet of blood, worthy of her pain and her sincerity, opened like a ten-fingered hand as in the feet, nailed there but storm-filled, of a Christ by Juan de Juni.

    http://www.poetryintranslation.com/klineaslorcaduende.htm

    _________________________________________________

    There is something of that, I think, in the best of roots reggae—e.g., the Live at the Rainbow performance of “No Woman, No Cry”. (Though I also agree with you about “Redemption Song”.) Although you can no doubt discern my predilection for lyricism, roots reggae also has the whole Rasta philosophy behind it, and the repetitive “riddims” you mention can draw the listener into a state of Irie, where some of the more message-lyrics can perhaps penetrate the subconscious (which can be the purpose of repetition in lots of contemplative music as well).

    I cannot really just listen to good reggae anyway—I have to dance or drum along, I have to move

    Bless up!


    _______________________________________

    It is perhaps apparent that I have no schooling in music at all. Nevertheless, if I were condemned to listen to just one piece of music for the rest of my life, it might be Beethoven's Ninth...
  10. 31 May '12 21:35
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I think the crown in his life was getting the two opposition leaders in Jamaica to hold hands on stage at that concert. The symbolism was unmistakable, two white leaders with a half black half white Marley with his hands on both theirs upraised.
    Yeah, there is something uncannily powerful about Bob in performance, whatever the limits of his technical gifts, that can have that kind of influence. You can see in the photos that neither Manley nor Seaga is very comfortable with that tableau, neither really wanted to go up there and clasp hands (hell, their poltical gangs had been killing one another!).

    The (at least once) remote Havasupai AmerIndians apparently revere Marley as a kind of prophet—

    “A side note: When Bob Marley heard this ancient, remote tribe was listening to his music, he promised to go there but, unfortunately, he died before he could keep his promise. In 1982, a year after his death, Bob's mother, Mama B, had a generator and electric piano helicoptered in and in front of Havasu Falls, with the entire tribe gathered around, she played her son's music until dawn.”

    —http://www.mynewsletterbuilder.com/tools/view_newsletter.php?newsletter_id=1409548229

    My wife and I somehow missed out on the Marley “phenomenon” when we were younger. After watching the “Live at the Rainbow” performance on DVD for the first time, she turned to me and said: “How did we ever miss out on that? How sad!” American author Alice Walker (The Color Purple) once said something similar: “I missed Bob Marley when his body was alive, and I have often wondered how that could possibly be.” (Alice Walke, “Nine Mile”.)

    Haven’t been able to see the film yet (we live out in the boondocks, with slow internet, and 60 some miles from the nearest theatre that showed it; and we couldn’t make it when it was showing). But my wife pre-ordered the DVD, which will be out in August.

    Bless up, and all be Irie, I!