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  1. 17 May '11 23:46 / 1 edit
    http://www.liberty/juice.com/2011/05/17/get-ready-to-begin-paying-50-per-100-watt-light-bulbs/

    Come January 2012, instead of paying about $1.83 for a packet of 4 100 watt light bulbs, the great citizens of the US, who are now shelling out ever more money for food and gas, will soon be shelling out about $50 for only one light bulb. That's right $50 per bulb!!

    Two leading makers of lighting products are showcasing LED bulbs that are bright enough to replace energy guzzling 100 watt bulbs set to disappear from stores in January as soon as a governmental ban goes into effect for what we use now.

    So all you cap and trade lovers will say, what about CFL bulbs? Can't you buy them and are they not affordable?

    http://www.suite101.com/content/the-downside-to-compact-fluorescent-bulbs-a103105

    CFL light bulbs do save energy and are affordable, but they also have problems associated with them. To begin with, they contain mercury. One of the biggest reasons to buy CFLs is that because they use so little energy, they reduce overall emissions of mercury into the air from power plant smoke stacks. However, as noted above, all fluorescent bulbs contain a tiny bit of mercury, which is highly toxic. A report by Yale University researchers in 2008 concluded that, depending on the state or country involved, the use of CFL's may actually increase total mercury released to the environment. The reason is that power plants use different fuel sources, which release different amount of mercury into the air. In some locations that use cleaner coal, or that have few recycling options, the mercury leaked into the environment from landfilled CFL's could actually surpass the amount saved by using less electricity from power plants.

    To dispose of these light bulbs, they must either be recycled or taken to an approved disposal site but we all know that this will not happen every time. In fact, the poorer the regions the less likely this will occur. In addition, if one of these bulbs break, good luck cleaning up the toxic waste. If you decide to save a boat load of money and clean it up yourself, it is recommended that you open all your windows and "air out" the toxic waste. In addition, any materials that come into contact with the mercury is to be disposed of and sealed in a jar or double plastic bags. You are to avoid the use of vacuum cleaners or brooms which might stir the mercury into the air which is not a very good idea.

    Lesser problems with CFL's is that they do not work on dimmer switches, unless buying more expensive CFL's to do the job, and even at that the transition is abrupt, not smooth. And lastly, good luck getting the CFL's to work outdoors. In cold weather they take a very long time to "warm up" and work properly. In fact, the Canadian Centre for Housing Technology did a study and said that houses with CFL's replacing incandescent bulbs will have an increase in energy costs for heating in winter.

    All I can say is that I think forcing us to use ethanol in our gas is a better idea than this. I never thought I would ever be able to say that about government mandated ethanol use.
  2. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    17 May '11 23:54
    Originally posted by whodey
    http://www.liberty/juice.com/2011/05/17/get-ready-to-begin-paying-50-per-100-watt-light-bulbs/

    Come January 2012, instead of paying about $1.83 for a packet of 4 100 watt light bulbs, the great citizens of the US, who are now shelling out ever more money for food and gas, will soon be shelling out about $50 for only one light bulb. That's right $50 per b ...[text shortened]... ever thought I would ever be able to say that about government mandated ethanol use.
    I don't understand. I get those curly CFL light bulbs at Walmart and when they're on sale a 4 pack costs about 10 bucks. If I need an emergency one at Target or something they're maybe $5 apiece.

    That's mote than the incandescent bulbs cost but where does the $50 come from?
  3. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    18 May '11 00:01
    LED are different than both fluorescent and incandescent.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LED_lamp
  4. 18 May '11 00:16 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by sh76
    I don't understand. I get those curly CFL light bulbs at Walmart and when they're on sale a 4 pack costs about 10 bucks. If I need an emergency one at Target or something they're maybe $5 apiece.

    That's mote than the incandescent bulbs cost but where does the $50 come from?
    They will be replacing the incandescent light bulbs with LED bulbs costing $50 a peice. Therefore, everyone will be running out to buy CFL bulbs, like the ones you mention.

    I then provided an article stating the problems associated with CFL use. I suppose if increased mercury levels in your water are not a concern nor the risk of them breaking and turning your home into a toxic waste site concern you then so be it.
  5. 18 May '11 00:58
    There are bigger issues with this, such as how and why did we give up what we had, and fail to pursue more, of the mineral elemant that you need for the squirelys.
  6. 18 May '11 02:06
    Originally posted by badmoon
    There are bigger issues with this, such as how and why did we give up what we had, and fail to pursue more, of the mineral elemant that you need for the squirelys.
    All I know is that the government has the capability to micromanage which light bulbs everyone uses but somehow can't secure the border. Then again, maybe the Mexicans will start making the old fashion kind and start smuggling them across the border. Hmmm.
  7. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    18 May '11 02:43
    The amount of mercury in CFL bulbs is very small -- around 4 milligrams in older bulbs, with newer ones having as little as 1 milligram. Opening windows and putting on a hazmat suit when a bulb breaks is massive overkill. But I know overkill is just your style.

    Also, I do not believe halogen lights (bulb-shaped or otherwise) are going to be banned or whatever. They work with dimmer switches and are reasonably priced.
  8. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    18 May '11 02:48
    At http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase-out_of_incandescent_light_bulbs I find this:

    In December 2007, many of these state efforts became moot when the federal government enacted the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which requires all general-purpose light bulbs that produce 310–2600 lumens of light[8] be 30% more energy efficient (similar to current halogen lamps) than current incandescent bulbs by 2012 to 2014. The efficiency standards will start with 100-watt bulbs in January 2012 and end with 40-watt bulbs in January 2014.

    Light bulbs outside of this range are exempt from the restrictions (historically, less than 40 Watts or more than 150 Watts). Also exempt are several classes of specialty lights, including appliance lamps, rough service bulbs, 3-way, colored lamps, and plant lights.

    By 2020, a second tier of restrictions would become effective, which requires all general-purpose bulbs to produce at least 45 lumens per watt (similar to current CFLs). Exemptions from the Act include reflector flood, 3-way, candelabra, colored, and other specialty bulbs.



    So, basically, we're not really talking about a ban at all. No one is going to be forced to buy CFL lights, much less $50 LED lights.
  9. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    18 May '11 03:05
    Originally posted by Soothfast
    So, basically, we're not really talking about a ban at all. No one is going to be forced to buy CFL lights, much less $50 LED lights.
    Welcome to a Whodey Thread.
  10. 18 May '11 03:22 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Soothfast
    The amount of mercury in CFL bulbs is very small -- around 4 milligrams in older bulbs, with newer ones having as little as 1 milligram. Opening windows and putting on a hazmat suit when a bulb breaks is massive overkill. But I know overkill is just your style.

    Also, I do not believe halogen lights (bulb-shaped or otherwise) are going to be banned or whatever. They work with dimmer switches and are reasonably priced.
    Halogen lights? Does anyone use halogen lights in their house? I've seen them used on cars, but not in houses.

    As for overkill, if you read the article you will note that mercury levels are estimated to be increased in water levels with increased use of CFL bulbs. I would think this would increase their use, don't you?

    Of course, the kicker here is that the government is banning something from use. Why? If Americans are willing to pay for the electricity, what business of it is theirs?

    Here is another recent ban in the news.

    http://stabbygrass.tumblr.com/post/5117397293/fed-cracks-down-on-amish-selling-contraband-milk-after

    Apparently a group of Amish farmers were transporting raw milk across state lines for sale. In addition, the containers were not labelled. I repeat, the containers were not labelled!!

    Face it, the country is turning into a police state.....except at the border where they post signs saying to keep out due to lawless activity. I say if they are going to ban traditional light bulbs, at least paint a burqa on them or something.
  11. 18 May '11 03:25
    Originally posted by FMF
    Welcome to a Whodey Thread.
    Could you expound on welcome? It sounds to me like your being a little satirical and are hiding something. Perhaps you are a right winged bigot, is that it FMF.

    God help me I'm turning into FMF!!!!
  12. 18 May '11 03:34
    Originally posted by Soothfast
    At http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase-out_of_incandescent_light_bulbs I find this:

    [b]In December 2007, many of these state efforts became moot when the federal government enacted the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which requires all general-purpose light bulbs that produce 310–2600 lumens of light[8] be 30% more energy efficient (similar ...[text shortened]... about a ban at all. No one is going to be forced to buy CFL lights, much less $50 LED lights.
    But the light bulbs in question are not capable of meeting up to government standards, so yes, it is a ban nonetheless.

    So tell us, what other things should the governemnt be banning? How about smoking? We will just say that pollutants that cause "X" amount of pollution in your lungs should be disallowed. That way we won't be officially banning cigs.
  13. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    18 May '11 04:00
    Originally posted by whodey
    Halogen lights? Does anyone use halogen lights in their house? I've seen them used on cars, but not in houses.
    Go to http://www.elightbulbs.com/A-Line-Halogen-Light-Bulbs

    Halogen light bulbs are, basically, incandescent bulbs; but they're much more efficient and most certainly are NOT solely used in cars. I had a cheap halogen floor lamp with a dimmer knob twenty years ago. You don't get out much, do you? It just makes sense to phase out old, outmoded technologies in favor of newer, better ones, and if some modest legislation can make that happen faster than waiting (possibly decades) for The Invisible Hand Of The Market to do it, then I say go for it. Basically the crappiest dollar store incandescent bulbs from China are being targeted by the legislation you're railing against. You can get a $4 halogen bulb that outwardly looks and acts EXACTLY THE SAME as the crappy $1 bulb, but will last three times as long and consume $5 less electricity. You're fixated on CFL and LED lights and overlooking halogens altogether.
  14. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    18 May '11 04:04
    Originally posted by whodey
    But the light bulbs in question are not capable of meeting up to government standards, so yes, it is a ban nonetheless.

    So tell us, what other things should the governemnt be banning? How about smoking? We will just say that pollutants that cause "X" amount of pollution in your lungs should be disallowed. That way we won't be officially banning cigs.
    You have a penchant for taking two points of data and extrapolating a straight line into absurdity and beyond. Just like a little kid. It's occasionally amusing.
  15. 18 May '11 04:12 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Soothfast
    Go to http://www.elightbulbs.com/A-Line-Halogen-Light-Bulbs

    Halogen light bulbs are, basically, incandescent bulbs; but they're much more efficient and most certainly are NOT solely used in cars. I had a cheap halogen floor lamp with a dimmer knob twenty years ago. You don't get out much, do you? It just makes sense to phase out old, outmoded techno less electricity. You're fixated on CFL and LED lights and overlooking halogens altogether.
    You have the penchant for taking one piece of data and ignoring the rest of the world around you, just like an infant fixated on his mobile. I just love it when you ignore US jobs lost and simply focus on the evil Chinese who have turned to capitalism. How about the jobs lost in Winchester VA as the last GE incondescent light bulb factory closed down? No mention of them? Hmmm.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/07/AR2010090706933.html

    If these other light bulbs are preferable due to such factors as longevity and comparible price, then why the ban?