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Debates Forum

  1. 15 Jan '10 17:33
    object: 2010 AL30
    date of discovery: 2010/01/04
    date of closest approach: 2010/01/13
    delta: 9 days

    space launch turnaround: months
    space mission turnaround: years

    i hope you have structured your investments accordingly.

    ------------------

    http://news.google.com/news/search?aq=f&pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&q=mysterious+object

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_AL30

    2010 AL30 is a near-Earth asteroid (or possibly a comet) that was discovered on 4 January 2010.[1]

    It has a diameter of between 33 and 50 feet. On January 13, 2010, it came within approximately 80,000 miles of Earth, which is about 1/3 of the distance from the Earth to the Moon (or 0.33 LD).[2]
  2. 15 Jan '10 17:40
    object: Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9
    date of discovery: 1993/03/24
    date of closest approach: 1994/07/16
    delta: 1 year, 3 months, 22 days


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comet_Shoemaker-Levy_9#Jupiter_as_a_.22cosmic_vacuum_cleaner.22

    ...

    Recently, however, it has been shown that the presence of a giant planet may in fact increase the impact rate of asteroids on the Earth significantly. [38][39]
  3. Standard member ua41
    Sharp Edge
    15 Jan '10 18:24
    What's to debate?
  4. 15 Jan '10 18:40
  5. 15 Jan '10 18:40
    Originally posted by Hugh Glass
    Welcome to my world. Although spending money for humanitairn aide does not bother me. We must leave this earth, knowing we did something that helped mankind.
    It's the rockets to the moon to check for water, at around 2million. Building a Ted Kennedy memorial at a period in time when we can least afford it.
    Paying a state 300 million for a vote on healthcare......... now that eats at me some nights.
    Say, how much tax do you pay for a six pack of beer? Any idea?
  6. 15 Jan '10 18:40
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Well, the rocketmen actually DID leave earth a better place. We now know more about the perils of the universe at large because of them and countless thousands of other space workers ( I did my bit) and it is money well spent. We can now devise and implement space systems to defend against asteroids slamming into our planet which happens on a regular basis (see Tunguska if you don't believe it's a real threat).
    So there are all kinds of people doing good work. If governments do not lead in the hopeless situation in Haiti, the actual help will be much lower.
  7. 15 Jan '10 18:41
    should we increase funding on space programs?
  8. 15 Jan '10 23:28
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    should we increase funding on space programs?
    That depends on you. Do you believe that your life is in the hands of The Lord?
    Is it your destiny to spend eternity in Heaven?
    If so, then don't give it another thought.
    If not, then perhaps you can take some comfort in thinking, someday you will spawn again from mud and UV rays, and begin the trip again.
  9. 16 Jan '10 01:47
    Originally posted by Hugh Glass
    That depends on you. Do you believe that your life is in the hands of The Lord?
    Is it your destiny to spend eternity in Heaven?
    If so, then don't give it another thought.
    If not, then perhaps you can take some comfort in thinking, someday you will spawn again from mud and UV rays, and begin the trip again.
    We are not prepared now and most likely we will not be prepared when the big rock does come. Some are quite content to see children suffer now; they can't be concerned with the children of our future. Unfortunately, this inability to feel compassion for others is a kind brain-defect that has serious consequences. There is every likelihood that the rock we miss (or even see) is sufficient to end us. I suspect that if we do fall victim to the big rock it will be because we just have too much brain damage. Poor little brain-damaged humans, we may not be smart enough to survive.
  10. Standard member StarValleyWy
    BentnevolentDictater
    18 Jan '10 23:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by TerrierJack
    We are not prepared now and most likely we will not be prepared when the big rock does come. Some are quite content to see children suffer now; they can't be concerned with the children of our future. Unfortunately, this inability to feel compassion for others is a kind brain-defect that has serious consequences. There is every likelihood that the rock w ...[text shortened]... too much brain damage. Poor little brain-damaged humans, we may not be smart enough to survive.
    I remember reading H. Ellisons 'Strange Wine'

    He said, "I now believe that television itself, the medium of sitting in front of a magic box that pulses images at us endlessly, the act of watching TV, per se, is mind crushing. It is soul-deadining, dehumanizing, soporific in a poisonous way, ultimately brutalizing. It is, simply put so you cannot mistake my meaning, a bad thing."

    I would second his analysis and add that in much the same way, the same is true of the internet. How in this world, or any other, can you link the future sufference of children to an astroid hitting the planet Earth? Would all the tender love for children of all of humanity for all time -- added up into one giant wet kissy kind of thing -- abuse an astroid so badly as to divert it to the nether regions of our small little system?

    (This is humor in case you miss it in any way!)
  11. 19 Jan '10 21:45
    Originally posted by StarValleyWy
    I remember reading H. Ellisons 'Strange Wine'

    He said, "I now believe that television itself, the medium of sitting in front of a magic box that pulses images at us endlessly, the act of watching TV, per se, is mind crushing. It is soul-deadining, dehumanizing, soporific in a poisonous way, ultimately brutalizing. It is, simply put so you cannot mist ...[text shortened]... her regions of our small little system?

    (This is humor in case you miss it in any way!)


    StarValleyWy
    Games Played 44

    zeeblebot
    Games Played 2585
  12. 19 Jan '10 21:46
    welcom back SVY!
  13. 20 Jan '10 04:40
    Originally posted by zeeblebot


    StarValleyWy
    Games Played 44

    zeeblebot
    Games Played 2585
    People who live in Star Valley Wyoming have a whole bunch more to do than play chess,,,,
    Dude, did you get your elk?
  14. 20 Jan '10 05:40 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    object: 2010 AL30
    date of discovery: 2010/01/04
    date of closest approach: 2010/01/13
    delta: 9 days

    space launch turnaround: months
    space mission turnaround: years

    i hope you have structured your investments accordingly.

    ------------------

    http://news.google.com/news/search?aq=f&pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&q=mysterious+object

    http://en ...[text shortened]... 0 miles of Earth, which is about 1/3 of the distance from the Earth to the Moon (or 0.33 LD).[2]
    I have to admit, I used to be one of those people who thought that humanity needed to find ways to find another home if need be. However, the more I learn about how life is protected on earth and how we are dependent on earths cocoon, the more I feel that it is all a waste of time. Case in point was an experiment conducted to see how long humans could exist in a self contained enviroment independent from the earth. They locked themselves in a biosphere with assumingly everything they needed. They had the plants and food they needed and simply recycled most of what they needed. However, after about a year or so the plants began to die off, with no explanation as to why. Scientifically, there were no answers. It seemed as though just the isolation from the life giving environment of earth was the reason for their demise. So how would this be any different on a planet with a hostile environment? Face it, the earth is a cradle of life. Life springs from it from pretty much any and every environment no matter how inhospitable. The only question is, why?