Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 07 May '10 01:33
    As we see riots in the streets of Greece explode after the government has vowed to slash spending and increase taxes so as not to become insolvent, can we expect to see more of this in the future as we see other governments headed in the same direction? In short, is this the beginning of the end for "democracies" around the world?
  2. 07 May '10 02:30
    Originally posted by whodey
    As we see riots in the streets of Greece explode after the government has vowed to slash spending and increase taxes so as not to become insolvent, can we expect to see more of this in the future as we see other governments headed in the same direction? In short, is this the beginning of the end for "democracies" around the world?
    I think it is the beginning of the end for fiat currencies. At least the ones currently in existence. Mankind will make the same mistake again sometime down the road.
  3. 07 May '10 02:41 / 1 edit
    So where are all the socialist groupies out there? Who is to blame? Did Greece sell out their own people to the IMF by slashing their entitlements and raising their taxes at their insistance? Should Greece have given the finger to the IMF in regards to their bail out money and instead ONLY gone after the "rich" in their country to seek "social justice"? Or was Greece simply fiscally incompotent and living beyond their means?
  4. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    07 May '10 02:44
    Originally posted by whodey
    In short, is this the beginning of the end for "democracies" around the world?
    No.
  5. 07 May '10 04:16
    Originally posted by whodey
    As we see riots in the streets of Greece explode after the government has vowed to slash spending and increase taxes so as not to become insolvent, can we expect to see more of this in the future as we see other governments headed in the same direction? In short, is this the beginning of the end for "democracies" around the world?
    Chaos is a greek word.
  6. 07 May '10 05:46
    Originally posted by whodey
    So where are all the socialist groupies out there? Who is to blame? Did Greece sell out their own people to the IMF by slashing their entitlements and raising their taxes at their insistance? Should Greece have given the finger to the IMF in regards to their bail out money and instead ONLY gone after the "rich" in their country to seek "social justice"? Or was Greece simply fiscally incompotent and living beyond their means?
    i'm thinking no one else was going to help bail them out if they couldn't get the IMF on board.
  7. 07 May '10 10:45
    Originally posted by whodey
    So where are all the socialist groupies out there? Who is to blame? Did Greece sell out their own people to the IMF by slashing their entitlements and raising their taxes at their insistance? Should Greece have given the finger to the IMF in regards to their bail out money and instead ONLY gone after the "rich" in their country to seek "social justice"? Or was Greece simply fiscally incompotent and living beyond their means?
    The blame lies with the Greek government and its inability to tackle corruption and tax evasion as well as funding prestige projects such as the 2004 Olympic Games they could not afford. Countries with similar rates of corruption face similar issues.
  8. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    07 May '10 10:52
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    The blame lies with the Greek government and its inability to tackle corruption and tax evasion as well as funding prestige projects such as the 2004 Olympic Games they could not afford. Countries with similar rates of corruption face similar issues.
    What's a rate of corruption?
  9. 07 May '10 10:59
    Originally posted by Palynka
    What's a rate of corruption?
    Err, degree, severity... take your pick.
  10. 07 May '10 13:44
    Originally posted by whodey
    As we see riots in the streets of Greece explode after the government has vowed to slash spending and increase taxes so as not to become insolvent, can we expect to see more of this in the future as we see other governments headed in the same direction? In short, is this the beginning of the end for "democracies" around the world?
    New Jersey is being forced to slash spending (especially on education) and increase (property) taxes so as not to become insolvent. And despite some testiness from the governor and members of the various interest groups, things seem to be going relatively peacefully.

    Maybe despite our rowdy politics, the great majority of people in the US are actually very willing to accept the medicine that's needed to heal our fiscal problems.
  11. 07 May '10 14:53
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Err, degree, severity... take your pick.
    Perhaps the degree that causes insolvency?
  12. Subscriber Sleepyguy
    Reepy Rastardly Guy
    07 May '10 15:12
    Originally posted by Melanerpes
    New Jersey is being forced to slash spending (especially on education) and increase (property) taxes so as not to become insolvent. And despite some testiness from the governor and members of the various interest groups, things seem to be going relatively peacefully.

    Maybe despite our rowdy politics, the great majority of people in the US are actually very willing to accept the medicine that's needed to heal our fiscal problems.
    Then we're going to need a whole lot more like Christie to spoon out the medicine, but he seems to be a rare find.
  13. 07 May '10 15:13
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    Then we're going to need a whole lot more like Christie to spoon out the medicine, but he seems to be a rare find.
    I hear he is getting death threats. LOL.
  14. Subscriber Sleepyguy
    Reepy Rastardly Guy
    07 May '10 15:29 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    I hear he is getting death threats. LOL.
    Well, more like wishes for his death from the head of the teachers union. Just a tasteless joke really. But it's probably his own fault for being so testy.
  15. 07 May '10 15:36
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    Then we're going to need a whole lot more like Christie to spoon out the medicine, but he seems to be a rare find.
    Let's not give homage to the Mighty Christie quite yet. He's got a lot on his plate and he faces many challenges.

    But there is one reason why I generally have a LOT more respect for governors than other politicians (and especially talk show hosts).

    Governors can't just blather on about terrible the other party is. They can't even yak incessantly about the need to balance the budget. They have to actually put forth specific plans that (especially in times like the present) may inflict pain on real people. They have to face all of the unpleasant music and find a way to get it to pass.

    If Christie wants his governorship to be a success, he needs to actually achieve things. He can't just sit around sucking lemons and then declare victory in the mid-term election.