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Debates Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 Nov '12 11:46
    http://science.slashdot.org/story/12/11/21/0433233/student-refusing-rfid-badge-now-fights-expulsion-order?sdsrc=rel

    Should students be REQUIRED to wear these badges on a lanyard around their necks?

    The school wants to track the movement of all the students.

    Is this an invasion of privacy? Should it be allowed?

    I see a judge ordered a temporary blockage of the expulsion order.

    I wonder what would happen if the entire student body refused to wear these badges?

    Is this all ok?
  2. 29 Nov '12 11:55
    Would your opinions differ if they were non-RFID ID badges?
  3. 29 Nov '12 12:33
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://science.slashdot.org/story/12/11/21/0433233/student-refusing-rfid-badge-now-fights-expulsion-order?sdsrc=rel

    Should students be REQUIRED to wear these badges on a lanyard around their necks?

    The school wants to track the movement of all the students.

    Is this an invasion of privacy? Should it be allowed?

    I see a judge ordered a temporary ...[text shortened]... er what would happen if the entire student body refused to wear these badges?

    Is this all ok?
    Yes, it is an invasion of privacy and no, it should not be allowed.
  4. 29 Nov '12 12:34
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Would your opinions differ if they were non-RFID ID badges?
    Kids have been wearing badges at school for years. I don't remember a big fuss about it. Not saying there wasn't one, but I don't remember it.
  5. 29 Nov '12 12:40
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://science.slashdot.org/story/12/11/21/0433233/student-refusing-rfid-badge-now-fights-expulsion-order?sdsrc=rel

    Should students be REQUIRED to wear these badges on a lanyard around their necks?

    The school wants to track the movement of all the students.

    Is this an invasion of privacy? Should it be allowed?

    I see a judge ordered a temporary ...[text shortened]... er what would happen if the entire student body refused to wear these badges?

    Is this all ok?
    Did you read through some of the comments on the link?
  6. 29 Nov '12 13:12
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://science.slashdot.org/story/12/11/21/0433233/student-refusing-rfid-badge-now-fights-expulsion-order?sdsrc=rel

    Should students be REQUIRED to wear these badges on a lanyard around their necks?

    The school wants to track the movement of all the students.

    Is this an invasion of privacy? Should it be allowed?

    I see a judge ordered a temporary ...[text shortened]... er what would happen if the entire student body refused to wear these badges?

    Is this all ok?
    it sounds a bit big brother-ish. but with the way technology is moving, wont mobile phones be operating like rfid tags anyway? i read that there will also be tags put into all clothes as well, used to trigger localized advertising and collect data about the habits of the wearer.
  7. 29 Nov '12 13:19
    Originally posted by stellspalfie
    i read that there will also be tags put into all clothes as well, used to trigger localized advertising and collect data about the habits of the wearer.
    It may happen but it would be a hard sell. People are very sensitive about privacy. Of course if you give them a cell phone (which can also track you) they won't complain at all.
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 Nov '12 13:45
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    It may happen but it would be a hard sell. People are very sensitive about privacy. Of course if you give them a cell phone (which can also track you) they won't complain at all.
    Hard sell? They are already doing it. When you buy something with rfid tags, some companies track you when you leave the store, competitors tracking where you just went so they can pitch you with some product.
  9. 29 Nov '12 14:00
    School spend hundred of thousands of dollars each year on hall monitors, security guards, deans, hall patrols and other expenses in the hopes of getting kids into class and getting kids to stop interfering with others learning. If technology can cheaply assist in this process and the saved money can be used for smaller class sizes and/ or more extra curricular activities I simply cannot see why it would not be done.
  10. Standard member spruce112358
    Democracy Advocate
    29 Nov '12 14:11
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://science.slashdot.org/story/12/11/21/0433233/student-refusing-rfid-badge-now-fights-expulsion-order?sdsrc=rel

    Should students be REQUIRED to wear these badges on a lanyard around their necks?

    The school wants to track the movement of all the students.

    Is this an invasion of privacy? Should it be allowed?

    I see a judge ordered a temporary ...[text shortened]... er what would happen if the entire student body refused to wear these badges?

    Is this all ok?
    No, these badges are an invasion of privacy.

    Worse, they interfere with delivering an important lesson that the student is responsible for where his is and what he is doing -- no one else. That's what "growing up" means. It is not the government's job to watch you and make sure you get to class or to work or out of bed (not yet anyway).

    This sends totally the wrong message.
  11. 29 Nov '12 14:48
    Originally posted by spruce112358
    No, these badges are an invasion of privacy.

    Worse, they interfere with delivering an important lesson that the student is responsible for where his is and what he is doing -- no one else. That's what "growing up" means. It is not the government's job to watch you and make sure you get to class or to work or out of bed (not yet anyway).

    This sends totally the wrong message.
    I'd argue that the badges assist in punishing those who don't grow up and do what they are supposed to do. Badges allow wrongdoers to be easily identified and disciplined without the school jumping through countless procedural hoops. While it may not be the government's job to get you into class, the school needs to identify those who disrupt classes by wandering hall ways or entrering classroom in which they do not belong.
  12. Standard member spruce112358
    Democracy Advocate
    29 Nov '12 15:03
    Originally posted by quackquack
    I'd argue that the badges assist in punishing those who don't grow up and do what they are supposed to do. Badges allow wrongdoers to be easily identified and disciplined without the school jumping through countless procedural hoops. While it may not be the government's job to get you into class, the school needs to identify those who disrupt classes by wandering hall ways or entrering classroom in which they do not belong.
    I've actually seen people put in place an expensive monitoring system to maintain compliance with procedural hoops that added no value to the final product. It was in a totally different context, but I'll let you guess what the outcome was.

    Let me ask you this: do you think the wrongdoers will allow themselves to be tracked by a badge they can simply remove from around their necks?
  13. 29 Nov '12 15:17
    Originally posted by spruce112358
    I've actually seen people put in place an expensive monitoring system to maintain compliance with procedural hoops that added no value to the final product. It was in a totally different context, but I'll let you guess what the outcome was.

    Let me ask you this: do you think the wrongdoers will allow themselves to be tracked by a badge they can simply remove from around their necks?
    Everyone certainly is against expensive monitoring systems that do no good. The issue is would you be for a relative cheap monitoring system that did good.
    To me there is real practical value in being able to punish someone for not having the ID badge (maybe even before they cause trouble) and there is much less grey area than punishing someone for distrurbing classes while slowly walking in the hallway on their way to the bathroom.
  14. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 Nov '12 17:28
    Originally posted by quackquack
    Everyone certainly is against expensive monitoring systems that do no good. The issue is would you be for a relative cheap monitoring system that did good.
    To me there is real practical value in being able to punish someone for not having the ID badge (maybe even before they cause trouble) and there is much less grey area than punishing someone for distrurbing classes while slowly walking in the hallway on their way to the bathroom.
    So you figure it would be a crime to walk below a certain number of feet per second in a hallway?

    I guess you would love to be a lawmaker.
  15. 29 Nov '12 17:42
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    So you figure it would be a crime to walk below a certain number of feet per second in a hallway?

    I guess you would love to be a lawmaker.
    I have taught in NYC public schools and tremendous number of resources are spent getting kids out of the hallway. There are kids who cut classes and just bang on doors outside classrooms, they enter rooms they do not belong in, they somtimes encourage kids in the classroom to leave the room without permission. This causes enough of a disruption that there are dean (teachers who sweep kids out of the classroom), and teachers who are posted in certain areas as if they are security guards. Other schools actually have security guards. If ID badges could help save some of the hundreds of thousands of dollars I'm for it.