Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Standard memberwolfgang59
    Mr. Wolf
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    03 Aug '18 11:37
    With the centenary of the end of WW1 approaching there will be many
    commemorative events, but should we be thanking those that served?
    That brave generation were duped into fighting a pointless war and they deserve our admiration for their loyalty to country and sense of duty. But
    thanking them seems to be ahistorical and in one sense disrespectful of
    their sacrifice, which if nothing else taught us of the futility of war.
  2. Standard memberuzless
    The So Fist
    Voice of Reason
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    03 Aug '18 14:35
    Originally posted by @wolfgang59
    With the centenary of the end of WW1 approaching there will be many
    commemorative events, but should we be thanking those that served?
    That brave generation were duped into fighting a pointless war and they deserve our admiration for their loyalty to country and sense of duty. But
    thanking them seems to be ahistorical and in one sense disrespectful of
    their sacrifice, which if nothing else taught us of the futility of war.
    Futility? You make it sound like there is some kind of societal end goal to war.

    War is about power and making money so in that sense it gives exactly what is expected from it: Power and Money.
  3. Standard membershavixmir
    Guppy poo
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    03 Aug '18 15:10
    Originally posted by @uzless
    Futility? You make it sound like there is some kind of societal end goal to war.

    War is about power and making money so in that sense it gives exactly what is expected from it: Power and Money.
    That doesn’t answer the question.

    Yes, the people who gained power and wealth through that war should be forced from their graves and paraded around with sign saying: thank you for dying for me.

    But, should I be thanking them?
    The question is well put.
  4. Joined
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    03 Aug '18 15:19
    Originally posted by @shavixmir
    That doesn’t answer the question.

    Yes, the people who gained power and wealth through that war should be forced from their graves and paraded around with sign saying: thank you for dying for me.

    But, should I be thanking them?
    The question is well put.
    It sounds like they should have our pity, and we theirs.
  5. Standard membershavixmir
    Guppy poo
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    03 Aug '18 17:34
    Originally posted by @js357
    It sounds like they should have our pity, and we theirs.
    I have a great deal of pity for most men who are shipped off to fight to make others rich.
    And a grand hatred of those who get rich by peddling their lies about religion, culture and nationality: the main motivations used to motivate us all into dying.

    I visit WW1 and 2 battle sights and memorials. It all leaves me disgusted with humanity.
  6. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    The Axe man
    Brisbane,QLD
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    03 Aug '18 23:10
    Originally posted by @wolfgang59
    With the centenary of the end of WW1 approaching there will be many
    commemorative events, but should we be thanking those that served?
    That brave generation were duped into fighting a pointless war and they deserve our admiration for their loyalty to country and sense of duty. But
    thanking them seems to be ahistorical and in one sense disrespectful of
    their sacrifice, which if nothing else taught us of the futility of war.
    Yes, we should thank and recognize them. We should also strive to know the truth of what happened.
  7. Subscriberdivegeester
    Leave Means Leave
    Voting not marching!
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    04 Aug '18 06:04
    Originally posted by @wolfgang59
    With the centenary of the end of WW1 approaching there will be many
    commemorative events, but should we be thanking those that served?
    That brave generation were duped into fighting a pointless war and they deserve our admiration for their loyalty to country and sense of duty. But
    thanking them seems to be ahistorical and in one sense disrespectful of
    their sacrifice, which if nothing else taught us of the futility of war.
    How does one thank someone who is dead?
  8. SubscriberGhost of a Dukeonline
    A Spirited Misfit
    in London
    Joined
    14 Mar '15
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    10941
    04 Aug '18 13:29
    Originally posted by @wolfgang59
    With the centenary of the end of WW1 approaching there will be many
    commemorative events, but should we be thanking those that served?
    That brave generation were duped into fighting a pointless war and they deserve our admiration for their loyalty to country and sense of duty. But
    thanking them seems to be ahistorical and in one sense disrespectful of
    their sacrifice, which if nothing else taught us of the futility of war.
    I'll gladly thank anybody who showed bravery to defend their country. It is their intent that deserves our gratitude.
  9. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
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    04 Aug '18 13:43
    Originally posted by @divegeester
    How does one thank someone who is dead?
    You thank them and their family members feel a sense of closure, the gratitude shown is for the living.
  10. Subscriberdivegeester
    Leave Means Leave
    Voting not marching!
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    04 Aug '18 17:22
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    You thank them and their family members feel a sense of closure, the gratitude shown is for the living.
    My question is; how does one thank a dead person?

    Clearly you cannot; expressing gratitude to the family is misplaced as they are not the dead person.
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