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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 11 Dec '09 17:17
    Newsweek this week has a possibly more up-to-date table, for foreign debt per capita, on the back page this week but i couldn't find an online version.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_external_debt

    Rank ↓ Country - Entity ↓ External debt
    (millions US$) ↓ Date of information ↓ External debt
    per capita (US$) ↓ Date of population* ↓ External debt (% of GDP) ↓
    73 Monaco $18,000 2000 $540,000 2000 est. 1843.70%
    7 Ireland $1,841,000 6/30/2007 $448,032 30-Jun-08 960.86%
    32 Iceland $116,053[6] 6/30/2009 $362,942 2008 998.64%[7]
    9 Switzerland $1,340,000 6/30/2007 $174,526 30-Jun-07 441.95%
    2 United Kingdom $12,670,000[citation needed] 6/24/2009 $174,167 July 2008 374.96%
    6 Netherlands $2,277,000 6/30/2007 $136,795 30-Jun-07 352.75%
    10 Belgium $1,313,000 6/30/2007 $126,202 30-Jun-07 348.74%
    18 Norway $469,100 6/30/2007 $98,530 30-Jun-07 190.23%
    14 Austria $752,500 6/30/2007 $90,289 30-Jun-07 233.70%
    17 Denmark $492,600 6/30/2007 $89,853 30-Jun-07 242.30%
    16 Hong Kong $588,000 2007 $84,445 2007 est. 200.48%
    4 France $4,396,000 6/30/2007 $68,183 30-Jun-07 211.86%
    15 Sweden $598,200 6/30/2006 $65,048 30-Jun-06 176.72%
    3 Germany $4,489,000 6/30/2007 $54,604 30-Jun-07 159.92%
    22 Finland $271,200 6/30/2007 $51,073 30-Jun-07 143.95%
    5 Spain $2,478,000 9/30/2008 $49,619 30 June 2007 est. 150.65%
    19 Portugal $461,200 12/31/2007 $43,196 30-Jun-07 188.63%
    1 United States[3] $13,773,000 6/30/2009 $42,343 31-March-08 95%
    12 Australia $826,400 12/31/2007 $38,798 30-Jun-07 106.91%
    57 Latvia $33,530 12/31/2007 $36,944 30-Jun-07 83.72%
    64 Cyprus $26,970 12/31/2007 $30,550 31 December 2007 est. 126.03%
    13 Canada $781,100 12/31/2008 $23,325 01-Jul-09 59.69%

    ...
  2. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    12 Dec '09 08:22
    I don't get the highlighting, dude.

    Finland is not part of Scandinavia. Same goes for the Netherlands.
  3. 12 Dec '09 08:37
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scandinavia

    Scandinavia[1] is a region in northern Europe that includes Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Finland is often considered a Scandinavian country in common English usage, and Iceland and the Faroe Islands are sometimes also included.[2]
  4. 12 Dec '09 08:38
    i remember bolding nederlands when i meant to bold norway, then not going back to fix it.

    and i forgot denmark!!!
  5. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    12 Dec '09 08:41
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    Finland is often considered a Scandinavian country in common English usage[2]
    And just because English speakers screw up it makes the whole mistake right?

    Anglocentric! Argh! Mods! Help!
  6. 12 Dec '09 09:01
    Originally posted by Seitse
    And just because English speakers screw up it makes the whole mistake right?

    Anglocentric! Argh! Mods! Help!
    hah! skewered and ready for the barbie!
  7. 12 Dec '09 09:17
    What are you trying to argue here?
  8. 12 Dec '09 09:19
    the SM is bought with foreign debt.
  9. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    12 Dec '09 09:24
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    the SM is bought with foreign debt.
    Can you back that up?

    Perhaps comparing the debt of other countries and then contrasting with their
    quality of life rankings would make an interesting point to debate.
  10. 12 Dec '09 09:40 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    the SM is bought with foreign debt.
    Do you even understand what these figures mean?

    They include "private debt". Most of the "private debt" is not consumers buying something abroad, but it's companies trading with each other and being in debt with each other. If Norway trades more with Sweden, the figure will be higher. If Vermont trades more with Massachusetts, nothing changes.

    Even the public debt figures cannot be readily compared as you have to take into account the balance sheets of (public) pension funds, state investment funds and the value of state-owned assets.
  11. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    12 Dec '09 09:46
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scandinavia

    Scandinavia[1] is a region in northern Europe that includes Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Finland is often considered a Scandinavian country in common English usage, and Iceland and the Faroe Islands are sometimes also included.[2]
    Good for wikipedia and its inclusive approach. It offers a 'wider', incorrect definition of "Scandanavia" so as not to make the ignorant feel not left out. Three cheers for dumbing down!
  12. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    12 Dec '09 11:52
    Originally posted by FMF
    Good for wikipedia and its inclusive approach. It offers a 'wider', incorrect definition of "Scandanavia" so as not to make the ignorant feel not left out. Three cheers for dumbing down!
    Lulz
  13. 13 Dec '09 02:12 / 2 edits
    here's the Newsweek figures.

    ---

    Foreign debt per capita. Figures based on external government debt, second quarter 2009. Sources: International Monetary Fund, U.S. Census Bureau, World Bank.

    27,746 : Greeks
    27,023 : Belgians
    26,502 : Austrians
    24,247 : Irish
    21,402 : Norwegians
    21,089 : Italians
    20,412 : Dutch
    18,946 : French
    15,574 : Germans
    13,617 : Finns
    11,094 : Americans
    09,410 : Danes
    08,715 : Spaniards
    07.058 : Swedes
    06,526 : Brits
    05,802 : Hungarians
    05,322 : Japanese
    05,213 : Canadians
    03,843 : Israelis
    03,635 : Slovenes

    Newsweek, Dec. 14, 2009, p. 72.
  14. 13 Dec '09 02:14
    Originally posted by Seitse
    Can you back that up?

    Perhaps comparing the debt of other countries and then contrasting with their
    quality of life rankings would make an interesting point to debate.
    it's in the OP. you can add quality of life rankings if you want. i don't see the point.
  15. 13 Dec '09 02:18
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008%E2%80%932009_Icelandic_financial_crisis

    A number of writers have linked Iceland's woes to the nation's adoption of neo-liberal economic policies starting in the 1990s.[109][110][111][112]