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Debates Forum

  1. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    04 Sep '12 06:54
    Egypt's veiled presenter in breakthrough TV appearance

    "A woman presenter has appeared on Egyptian state TV in an Islamic headscarf for what is believed to be the first time since the state channel opened in 1960.

    Fatima Nabil wore a cream-coloured headscarf as she read a news bulletin.

    Under the regime of ex-President Hosni Mubarak there was an unofficial ban on women presenters covering their hair.

    But the new Muslim Brotherhood-led government has introduced new rules, saying that nearly 70% of Egyptian women wear the headscarf."


    BBC [video clip]: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-19461178

    A small increment relatively speaking, but is this instance of increased freedom in post-Mubarak Egypt to be welcomed?
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    04 Sep '12 07:00
    They weren't allowed to cover their hair before? Very strange. Yes, this is a good thing.
  3. 04 Sep '12 13:19
    Originally posted by FMF
    [b]Egypt's veiled presenter in breakthrough TV appearance

    [quote]"A woman presenter has appeared on Egyptian state TV in an Islamic headscarf for what is believed to be the first time since the state channel opened in 1960.

    Fatima Nabil wore a cream-coloured headscarf as she read a news bulletin.

    Under the regime of ex-President Hosni Mubarak there ...[text shortened]... ely speaking, but is this instance of increased freedom in post-Mubarak Egypt to be welcomed?[/b]
    It is a concern that they gave the figure for how many women wear the headscarf, if it was simply about freedom of choice that would be irrelevant.

    I would imagine this is a worrying milestone for the secular forces in Egypt.
  4. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    04 Sep '12 13:22
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    It is a concern that they gave the figure for how many women wear the headscarf, if it was simply about freedom of choice that would be irrelevant.
    People take polls of opinions, behaviours and attributes all the time. I can see no particular connotation from there being a poll that has been taken on this matter.
  5. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    04 Sep '12 13:26
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    I would imagine this is a worrying milestone for the secular forces in Egypt.
    It's the ending of a ban imposed on a large proportion of the citizens by the de facto Mubarak dictatorship. Why would "secular forces in Egypt" not welcome the ending of a ban like this?
  6. 04 Sep '12 14:06
    Originally posted by FMF
    It's the ending of a ban imposed on a large proportion of the citizens by the de facto Mubarak dictatorship. Why would "secular forces in Egypt" not welcome the ending of a ban like this?
    I think you already know the answer fmf, but just in case you don't follow Egyptian affairs, the secularist's are convinced that the muslim brotherhood have always intended to turn Egypt into an islamic state in much the same way the taliban would.

    I have no idea how far off the mark this is, however, I do believe it will increase political tensions between the two factions.

    On a personal level I think people should be able to wear whatever they like on their heads and welcome the move.
  7. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    04 Sep '12 14:23 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    I think you already know the answer fmf, but just in case you don't follow Egyptian affairs, the secularist's are convinced that the muslim brotherhood have always intended to turn Egypt into an islamic state in much the same way the taliban would.
    So you think the "secularists" would prefer the ban that was imposed on a large proportion of the citizens by the Mubarak regime, to continue to be enforced? Do you also think [with your own knowledge of "Egyptian affairs"] that the "secularists" reckon that retaining the ban will prevent or hinder Egypt turning into a state like the one Taliban had and/or soon will have again?

    It's not me making a claim about what you have said. I have posed it as two questions because I am seeking clarification about what you mean by what you said.
  8. 04 Sep '12 14:26
    Originally posted by FMF
    So you think the "secularists" would prefer the ban that was imposed on a large proportion of the citizens by the Mubarak regime, to continue to be enforced? Do you also think [with your own knowledge of "Egyptian affairs"] that the "secularists" reckon that retaining the ban will prevent or hinder Egypt turning into a state like the one Taliban had and/or soon ...[text shortened]... as two questions because I am seeking clarification about what you mean by what you said.
    Yes
  9. 04 Sep '12 16:58
    Originally posted by FMF
    [b]Egypt's veiled presenter in breakthrough TV appearance

    [quote]"A woman presenter has appeared on Egyptian state TV in an Islamic headscarf for what is believed to be the first time since the state channel opened in 1960.

    Fatima Nabil wore a cream-coloured headscarf as she read a news bulletin.

    Under the regime of ex-President Hosni Mubarak there ...[text shortened]... ely speaking, but is this instance of increased freedom in post-Mubarak Egypt to be welcomed?[/b]
    It's a mixed bag. I understand the impulse behind France's attempt to ban the burka, but there's something hugely ironic about attempting to empower women by telling them what they can and can't wear.