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  1. Joined
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    11 Jul '13 23:35
    I've become rather partial to a redbush tea with a spoonful of honey in the evenings.

    Other people spread it on toast, or just eat it from the jar.

    What do you think is the best way? What health benefits does it bring? I'm using honey from local bees following the advice of my doctor who said it might help my hayfever symptoms.
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    12 Jul '13 00:21
    Dissolve honey in lukewarm/warm water if you suffer from excess somach acid. Cold water if you do not have stomach acid enough...

    Use wodden spoon, speically designed for honey. (Experts say that high temperature destroys all good ingredients in honey, so if you use it for tea, it´s nit important...)

    I use honey for beens, marinades etc.

    Benefits are arguable. For the real benefits you should be on a heavy honey-diet (one or two tea spoons of honey daily are nothing).
  3. Joined
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    12 Jul '13 00:371 edit
    Originally posted by vandervelde
    Dissolve honey in lukewarm/warm water if you suffer from excess somach acid. Cold water if you do not have stomach acid enough...

    Use wodden spoon, speically designed for honey. (Experts say that high temperature destroys all good ingredients in honey, so if you use it for tea, it´s nit important...)

    I use honey for beens, marinades etc.

    Benefit ...[text shortened]... benefits you should be on a heavy honey-diet (one or two tea spoons of honey daily are nothing).
    Interesting. I'm very intrigued by the wooden spoon – what is the difference between an ordinary wooden spoon and one designed for use with honey?

    I cooked Chinese double-cooked pork ribs with a honey-based coating once. Very delicious, if a bit sticky.

    Inspired by your post, I looked up the Wikipedia article (English) and found this:

    Other medical applications

    Unfiltered, pasteurized honey is widely believed to alleviate allergies, though neither commercially filtered nor raw honey was shown to be more effective than placebo in a controlled study of 36 participants with ocular allergies.[83] Nearly 1 in 3 of the volunteers dropped out of the study because they couldn't tolerate eating one tablespoon of honey every day due to the overly sweet taste.[84] The official conclusion: "This study does not confirm the widely held belief that honey relieves the symptoms of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis." A more recent study has shown pollen collected by bees to exert an antiallergenic effect, mediated by an inhibition of IgE immunoglobulin binding to mast cells. This inhibited mast cell degranulation and thus reduced allergic reaction.[85] The risk of experiencing anaphylaxis as an immune system reaction may outweigh any potential allergy relief.[84]
    A review in the Cochrane Library suggests honey could reduce the time it takes for a mild burn to heal — up to four days sooner in some cases. The review included 19 studies with 2,554 participants. Although the honey treatment healed mild burns faster than traditional dressings did, the author recommends viewing the findings with caution, since a single research centre performed all of the burn studies.[86]


    I take this to mean I should try a tablespoon per day (3 teaspoons) to potentially help my pollen allergy.
    I also searched for information on heating honey and the resultant changes to its properties. There wasn't a lot of stuff immediately apparent, but although it's hard to be certain it looked like having honey in tea should be absolutely fine as it's heated only for a short time and you don't need to put it in the tea while it's boiling hot.
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    12 Jul '13 00:46
    spoon for honey:::
    http://www.colourbox.com/preview/4929767-691886-wooden-spoon-for-honey-isolated.jpg

    The point is not to use ordinary - metal - spoon, I have been listening to it all my life, but it may be just a myth...

    And speaking of pollen - that´s healthy. Dissolved in goath milk or mineral water. And propolis, too.
  5. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    12 Jul '13 01:17
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    I've become rather partial to a redbush tea with a spoonful of honey in the evenings.

    Other people spread it on toast, or just eat it from the jar.

    What do you think is the best way? What health benefits does it bring? I'm using honey from local bees following the advice of my doctor who said it might help my hayfever symptoms.
    "Shock finding: More than 75 percent of all 'honey' sold in grocery stores contains no honey at all, by definition (Updated) Tuesday, November 08, 2011 by: Ethan A. Huff, staff writer Tags: honey, consumer alert, health news."

    Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/034102_honey_consumer_alert.html#ixzz2Yn16eSHV
  6. Joined
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    12 Jul '13 01:31
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    "Shock finding: More than 75 percent of all 'honey' sold in grocery stores contains no honey at all, by definition (Updated) Tuesday, November 08, 2011 by: Ethan A. Huff, staff writer Tags: honey, consumer alert, health news."

    Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/034102_honey_consumer_alert.html#ixzz2Yn16eSHV
    I heard about something similar over here in Britain, although it was nowhere near that figure. Some of the less reputable suppliers (who don't supply any of the major supermarkets or stores) pass off some kind of syrup as honey. The shopkeepers were unaware in most cases of what they were selling.
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    12 Jul '13 01:331 edit
    Originally posted by vandervelde
    spoon for honey:::
    http://www.colourbox.com/preview/4929767-691886-wooden-spoon-for-honey-isolated.jpg

    The point is not to use ordinary - metal - spoon, I have been listening to it all my life, but it may be just a myth...

    And speaking of pollen - that´s healthy. Dissolved in goath milk or mineral water. And propolis, too.
    That spoon looks as if it's a pain to clean. If you ask me, it looks like a gimmick. I'm happy enough with my metal teaspoon for now, but if I see an ordinary narrow wooden spoon when I'm browsing a kitchen shop, I'll get one.
  8. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    12 Jul '13 01:42
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    I heard about something similar over here in Britain, although it was nowhere near that figure. Some of the less reputable suppliers (who don't supply any of the major supermarkets or stores) pass off some kind of syrup as honey. The shopkeepers were unaware in most cases of what they were selling.
    Same here with 'Maple Syrup'.
  9. Standard memberptobler
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    12 Jul '13 04:171 edit
    Honey - best way to eat it? Not on an empty stomach! Scientists say nowadays that eating sweet foods on an empty stomach (if done often enough, I suppose) may eventually be a cause of diabetes...
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    12 Jul '13 04:33
    On your honey.
  11. Joined
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    12 Jul '13 12:36
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    Sounds delicious 🙂. At what stage did you add the honey to the stir fry?
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    12 Jul '13 13:06
    A friend of mine keeps bees here and I get my honey from him. Like a lot of bee keepers in North America he is seriously (in the next year or so he says) thinking about getting out of the business because of the attrition rate of his bees. He told me of a keeper friend of his in the states who had 18,000 hives (a big operation) who lost half of them and has since sold off the remainder. We all know why it's happening and they (the bee keepers associations) lobby the Monsantos of the world to little affect. Enjoy the honey while you can. 🙁
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    12 Jul '13 13:14
    Originally posted by Great Big Stees
    A friend of mine keeps bees here and I get my honey from him. Like a lot of bee keepers in North America he is seriously (in the next year or so he says) thinking about getting out of the business because of the attrition rate of his bees. He told me of a keeper friend of his in the states who had 18,000 hives (a big operation) who lost half of them ...[text shortened]... ociations) lobby the Monsantos of the world to little affect. Enjoy the honey while you can. 🙁
    Yes, the plight of the honeybee is the plight of all of us. In the EU there was recently a law passed banning the use of neonicotinoid pesticides – I haven't read any stories of resultant effect on bee populations but I hope they recover.

    What role have Monsanto played in all this, specifically?
  14. Joined
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    12 Jul '13 13:53
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    Yes, the plight of the honeybee is the plight of all of us. In the EU there was recently a law passed banning the use of neonicotinoid pesticides – I haven't read any stories of resultant effect on bee populations but I hope they recover.

    What role have Monsanto played in all this, specifically?
    I used the name as a catchall for the Multinational companies that genetically modify whatever in the food chain. They, Monsanto, along with others make seed crops that contain pestcontrol and as it's bees that do a lot of the pollinating of those crops the bees are susceptible (with deadly results) to those same builtin pesticides even though they claim to be pest specific.
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    12 Jul '13 15:30
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    That spoon looks as if it's a pain to clean. If you ask me, it looks like a gimmick. I'm happy enough with my metal teaspoon for now, but if I see an ordinary narrow wooden spoon when I'm browsing a kitchen shop, I'll get one.
    here in rural america, it's known as a "honey dipper", rather than a spoon...
    i just happen to turn many small items on my lathe in my shop, and honey dippers are just one kitchen item that sells well...
    as for cleaning, some folks never do...
    the honey in some homes is stored in a covered pot, a lot like a sugar bowl, and the honey dipper is stored right in the pot, like the sugar spoon is sometimes kept in the sugar bowl...
    if it ever gets nasty (and i've yet to see one i wouldn't eat from) soak it in hot water for two or three minutes and rinse clean...

    sugar does not spoil...
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