On being a teacher

On being a teacher

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iNOT A MORO!

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Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
That's a shame. Wrong environment for you?

What are you going to do now?
No; I'm simply not responsible enough or emotionally hardy enough to handle the high pressure demands given that nobody's teaching me how to run a class. Leaving work and still having tons of work to do is mental torture for me. I'm confused and stressed and have a million authority figures both at work at graduate school whose demands I need to satisfy. I really love the students. I've never really wanted to be around children or teenagers but now that I am I've learned to treasure them and have a profound respect for the responsibility that I have been trusted with. In fact I don't feel worthy of this responsibility since I haven't been doing my job very well. In this economy I have trouble justifying my paycheck. I don't feel like I deserve it and my school is NOT rich. We're down in the hood, right where a Blood neighborhood touches a Crip neighborhood. One of my student's Dad has those teardrop tattoos by his eye signifying that he's a killer and wants you to know it, but you know what? I feel comfortable with that. That's what I am used to. But being a middle class professional? It's an alien world to me.

It's the massive amounts of paperwork that really killed it for me. I am just not organized and responsible enough for a professional job like this I guess.

So, I'm looking into substitute teaching. If that doesn't work out my self esteem will be shattered, but hey, life's a beech sometimes!

And I think they do need me...nobody else in education knows jack squat about physical science. However just knowing something about that subject is not enough. I need to work on personal and social development hugely. You can see from my posts how easily I can alienate people. The social game is one that I am not good at yet for the most part and it's really hurting me.

N

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Originally posted by AThousandYoung
No; I'm simply not responsible enough or emotionally hardy enough to handle the high pressure demands given that nobody's teaching me how to run a class. Leaving work and still having tons of work to do is mental torture for me. I'm confused and stressed and have a million authority figures both at work at graduate school whose demands I need to sat ...[text shortened]... is one that I am not good at yet for the most part and it's really hurting me.
Kudos to you for being honest enough with yourself to see that you aren't up to the job (at least not for the time being) and taking the logical consequence. Through my job I get to know many preschool teachers and see how they work. Most of them do a decent job, some an excellent one, but once in a while I meet one who simply isn't fit for the job, but nevertheless they have been doing it for many years. They end up frustrated, stressed, feeling helpless and inadequate. They aren't bad people or without skills, they just lack some of the skills that are necessary for this specific job (and it sure is a tough job; I don't know if I'd be any good at it myself). And they have been doing it for so long that it's probably too late to start with something entirely new. It's really sad to see.

I hope you can find something that fits you better, allowing you to use the skills you have and develop those you would like to have.

P
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Originally posted by AThousandYoung
I take solace in the fact that education is a failing industry, and that everyone knows it. That is, I take solace because this suggests that my unpleasant experiences and difficulties are probably rooted in the nature of the industry and not just my own failings.

The idea of keeping in touch with my students feels kind of creepy to me somehow. I ...[text shortened]... fortable being an adult man keeping in touch with young teenagers who I chose to stop teaching.
It's not creepy at all, I talk to the parents too if it makes you feel better. It may be different for you leaving mid-year though, I finished the year with them through their graduation.

P
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Originally posted by AThousandYoung
No; I'm simply not responsible enough or emotionally hardy enough to handle the high pressure demands given that nobody's teaching me how to run a class. Leaving work and still having tons of work to do is mental torture for me. I'm confused and stressed and have a million authority figures both at work at graduate school whose demands I need to sat ...[text shortened]... is one that I am not good at yet for the most part and it's really hurting me.
The first year of teaching is very hard and its obviously the year that many decide its not for them. If you still thinks it for you but just find the level of work demanding, I would recommend talking to the principal or colleagues for help or advice on the work management. I left after 5 years because I didn't like who I worked with and I was offered a much better future elsewhere. It takes help and years to find your style and be able to manage the workload, and some environments make the job much harder.

But if you don't think its for you, don't sub, do something else. A teaching degree is accepted in many fields.

iNOT A MORO!

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Originally posted by PocketKings
The first year of teaching is very hard and its obviously the year that many decide its not for them. If you still thinks it for you but just find the level of work demanding, I would recommend talking to the principal or colleagues for help or advice on the work management. I left after 5 years because I didn't like who I worked with and I was offered a hink its for you, don't sub, do something else. A teaching degree is accepted in many fields.
I don't have a teaching degree. I have a biochemistry degree.

Education is where the jobs are. It always has been for me. I did not go into teaching because I wanted to be a teacher. I went into teaching because that's the job I was offered and I strive to be a man with a work ethic.

STS

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Originally posted by AThousandYoung
I don't have a teaching degree. I have a biochemistry degree.

Education is where the jobs are. It always has been for me. I did not go into teaching because I wanted to be a teacher. I went into teaching because that's the job I was offered and I strive to be a man with a work ethic.
Jebus Thousand with your degree you could get into OCS and fly jets in the Air Force. Beats doot-de-doing around like you're doing.

P
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Originally posted by AThousandYoung
I don't have a teaching degree. I have a biochemistry degree.

Education is where the jobs are. It always has been for me. I did not go into teaching because I wanted to be a teacher. I went into teaching because that's the job I was offered and I strive to be a man with a work ethic.
Easy dude, it was not an insult by any means. Just advice from one teacher to another. With that degree, do something else.

iNOT A MORO!

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Originally posted by PocketKings
Easy dude, it was not an insult by any means. Just advice from one teacher to another. With that degree, do something else.
Was my post defensive or aggressive? I didn't mean it to be. Sorry if I gave that impression!

Zellulärer Automat

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Originally posted by AThousandYoung
I need to work on personal and social development hugely. You can see from my posts how easily I can alienate people. The social game is one that I am not good at yet for the most part and it's really hurting me.
Takes courage to admit that and deal with it. Any number of underlying issues could be at play (neurodivergence?); I'd guess you need to find a person to talk to that can help you find out what needs probing. (My wild guess would be you have good abstract analytical skills but difficulty reading other people and as such relating to them; the Debates forum is good practice for you.)

On a side note, about the teaching, I can totally relate -- having taught English as a foreign language for several years in the past (a job I got by default, much like you) I can unequivocally state that my, shall we say, divergent emotional intelligence transformed a fairly easy, routine job (TEFL is much easier than high school) into a daily crucifixion. At the same time, the pain did force me to function better in areas I'd rather not have had to function at all.

P
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Originally posted by AThousandYoung
Was my post defensive or aggressive? I didn't mean it to be. Sorry if I gave that impression!
Eh, I do that alot, don't worry about.

Teaching can and should be a wonderful thing. But you can definitely find something better than it now, and better for you. You need to be able to wake up in the morning and somewhat like the job you're going to.

b
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Man, thanks for posting this. I wonder, would you consider looking into teaching in a community college? You seem to be interested in caring for the larger community in which your school is situated.

I work for a system of colleges that come out of the whole trade-school tradition (dating back to office stenography and accounting classes in 1900!), and the historical approach here has been, in fact, to work closely for the good of the community where the campus is situated. Now that our college has been regionally accredited, we retain that social mission.

The folks who attend community colleges typically had trouble the first time around, or never made it to college at all. A lot of them are older, and more focused; all of them are locals in the most literal sense of the word.

It isn't for everyone, as no teaching gig can be, but you sound like you cared. A lot. And about the right things. The preference for that approach at the community college hasn't changed at all, IMO.

Something to noodle, if you care to.

iNOT A MORO!

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Originally posted by blakbuzzrd
Man, thanks for posting this. I wonder, would you consider looking into teaching in a community college? You seem to be interested in caring for the larger community in which your school is situated.

I work for a system of colleges that come out of the whole trade-school tradition (dating back to office stenography and accounting classes in 1900!), and ...[text shortened]... at the community college hasn't changed at all, IMO.

Something to noodle, if you care to.
Community college teachers have Master's degrees, and I'm sure they have to do just as much grading and lesson preparation as middle school teachers.

I'm also an awkward fit for any organization that spends much of it's time talking about "social missions".

iNOT A MORO!

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We have teachers quitting left and right. One teacher quit, we hired another, he quit, and now we have a long term sub asking me "where do I get my lesson plans from?"

Sigh...

P
Upward Spiral

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Originally posted by AThousandYoung
We have teachers quitting left and right. One teacher quit, we hired another, he quit, and now we have a long term sub asking me "where do I get my lesson plans from?"

Sigh...
Read my virtual lips: LAPD Detective.

iNOT A MORO!

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Originally posted by Palynka
Read my virtual lips: LAPD Detective.
Your virtual lips appear to be shaking your head into submission.

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