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  1. SubscriberPonderable
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    10 Feb '15 10:51
    Exciting research on our bacterial friends:

    http://www.cell.com/pb/assets/raw/journals/research/cell-systems/do-not-delete/CELS1_FINAL.pdf

    Very interesting who is frequening the New York subway system (and I assume the findings wouldn't be very different elsewhere...
  2. Joined
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    10 Feb '15 14:25
    Originally posted by Ponderable
    Exciting research on our bacterial friends:

    http://www.cell.com/pb/assets/raw/journals/research/cell-systems/do-not-delete/CELS1_FINAL.pdf

    Very interesting who is frequening the New York subway system (and I assume the findings wouldn't be very different elsewhere...
    Wait till it's done elsewhere on earth or space. The possibilities of the growth in "unknown" species are potentially astronomical. My brain is tired and I'm only at 8,000. 🙄😲
  3. Standard memberHandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
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    10 Feb '15 15:37
    Originally posted by Ponderable
    Exciting research on our bacterial friends:

    http://www.cell.com/pb/assets/raw/journals/research/cell-systems/do-not-delete/CELS1_FINAL.pdf

    Very interesting who is frequening the New York subway system (and I assume the findings wouldn't be very different elsewhere...
    Thanks for posting this interesting study.

    What surprised me most was not the sheer number of microorganisms found in New York's
    subway system and public parks but the discovery that 48% of the DNA recovered from
    urban surfaces doesn't match any known organism.
  4. Standard memberredbadger
    Suzzie says Badger
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    10 Feb '15 18:34
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    48% od the DNA found is not from any recognisable known earth type creature
  5. SubscriberPonderable
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    10 Feb '15 18:36
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    The research group took swaps from different surfaces in the New York subway system and tried to identify everything that lived in that swaps.
    They were able to find out that a lot of pathogenic bacteria live there. For example the Pest bacterium.
    They also found that they didn't know the DNA from about half the cells. This is quite common in those swaps. There was an interesting paper on the bacterial fauna in human armpits...but I digress. Attempts to cultivate the new found lifeforms were not succesful.
  6. Standard memberblunderdog
    R.I.P. mikelom
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    10 Feb '15 19:22
    Originally posted by redbadger
    48% od the DNA found is not from any recognisable known earth type creature
    ...as opposed to the 100% unrecognizable DNA in you.

    People theorize you were sent from Kolob because your parents didn't want you. Now you go around wearing tights and calling yourself Pooperman. Your favorite is elephant dung.
  7. Subscribermoonbus
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    10 Feb '15 19:36
    "Can you condense it into a short paragraph for me to explain it to my kids please?"

    We are immersed in an ocean of micro-organisms, and even within our own bodies, there are more bacterial cells than human cells (by a factor of 10:1). Micro-organisms surround us and live inside us. Evolutionarily speaking, humans are not the supreme achievement they think themselves to be--bacteria are winning hands down. We are parasites on them: they can live without us but we cannot live without them.
  8. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
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    10 Feb '15 19:55
    Originally posted by moonbus
    "Can you condense it into a short paragraph for me to explain it to my kids please?"

    We are immersed in an ocean of micro-organisms, and even within our own bodies, there are more bacterial cells than human cells (by a factor of 10:1). Micro-organisms surround us and live inside us. Evolutionarily speaking, humans are not the supreme achievement they thin ...[text shortened]... hands down. We are parasites on them: they can live without us but we cannot live without them.
    Scientists already know we have analysed only a tiny fraction of the life forms out there so why is this such a big shocker? Especially since we already know DNA can be transferred laterally from bacteria to bacteria and from virus to bacteria and bacteria to virus.

    If enough DNA changes hands in one generation, think about how much different the DNA will look like in a thousand generations which is not that much time in the world of Bacteria.
  9. Standard memberredbadger
    Suzzie says Badger
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    10 Feb '15 20:01
    Originally posted by blunderdog
    ...as opposed to the 100% unrecognizable DNA in you.

    People theorize you were sent from Kolob because your parents didn't want you. Now you go around wearing tights and calling yourself Pooperman. Your favorite is elephant dung.
    bet you have your dick in your hands every time you post
  10. Standard memberHandyAndy
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    10 Feb '15 21:13
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    This is the summary offered by the authors of the report:

    The panoply of microorganisms and other species
    present in our environment influence human health
    and disease, especially in cities, but have not been
    profiled with metagenomics at a city-wide scale. We
    sequenced DNA from surfaces across the entire
    New York City (NYC) subway system, the Gowanus
    Canal, and public parks. Nearly half of the DNA
    (48 percent) does not match any known organism;
    identified organisms spanned 1,688 bacterial, viral,
    archaeal, and eukaryotic taxa, which were enriched
    for harmless genera associated with skin (e.g.,Acinetobacter).
    Predicted ancestry of human DNA left on subway surfaces
    can recapitulate U.S. Census demographic
    data, and bacterial signatures can reveal a station’s
    history, such as marine-associated bacteria in a
    hurricane-flooded station. Some evidence of pathogens
    was found (Bacillus anthracis), but a lack of reported
    cases in NYC suggests that the pathogens represent
    a normal, urban microbiome. This baseline metagenomic
    map of NYC could help long-term disease surveillance,
    bioterrorism threat mitigation, and health
    management in the built environment of cities.
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