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  1. 01 Apr '10 08:46
    Play better moves than they do.
  2. Subscriber jankrbonline
    Conductor
    01 Apr '10 09:41
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    This is corresponce chess! That means automatically that everybody can take his/her time.

    If you don't like that, arrange games with a faster timecontrol or play Blitz....
  3. Standard member orion25
    Art is hard
    01 Apr '10 10:03 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by jankrb
    This is corresponce chess! That means automatically that everybody can take his/her time.

    If you don't like that, arrange games with a faster timecontrol or play Blitz....
    he was referring to OTB play

    It's quiet simple actually, you just take your time as well. Better still, you can create plans while he is taking his time to think about his move.
  4. 01 Apr '10 10:33
    Originally posted by orion25
    he was referring to OTB play

    It's quiet simple actually, you just take your time as well. Better still, you can create plans while he is taking his time to think about his move.
    i always wondered about this, like if you would get freaked out by like everyone watching you when you were thinking, your opponents psyching you out when it was your turn to move. It appears to me to add a whole new dimension of psychological warfare, not only from ones opponent, either directly on indirectly, but from oneself. Yes it would be troublesome i reckon sitting there watching someone think, what can you do? i think you need to detach yourself and simply concentrate on your strategy.
  5. Subscriber jankrbonline
    Conductor
    01 Apr '10 10:44
    Originally posted by orion25
    he was referring to OTB play
    Sorry, I read to quick. Missed OTB, just saw "slow opponents".

    In OTB, when I am faced with a slow opponent, I allways try to complicate the position. Hoping it will cost him even more time.
    In the end of the game they usually make mistakes....
  6. Standard member peacedog
    Highlander
    01 Apr '10 11:01
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    i always wondered about this, like if you would get freaked out by like everyone watching you when you were thinking, your opponents psyching you out when it was your turn to move. It appears to me to add a whole new dimension of psychological warfare, not only from ones opponent, either directly on indirectly, but from oneself. Yes it would be tro ...[text shortened]... , what can you do? i think you need to detach yourself and simply concentrate on your strategy.
    I find slow players much easier to play against than fast players. For one thing, you can use his time to think. This helps alot when you yourself are a slow player. When facing a fast player OTB I always seem to end up in time trouble.

    Another thing is some fast players move so fast and confidantly that it makes you think that you are wasting your and your opponents time by thinking about the moves. This can be psycologically crushing if he has a better position.
  7. Standard member orion25
    Art is hard
    01 Apr '10 11:13
    Originally posted by peacedog
    I find slow players much easier to play against than fast players. For one thing, you can use his time to think. This helps alot when you yourself are a slow player. When facing a fast player OTB I always seem to end up in time trouble.

    Another thing is some fast players move so fast and confidantly that it makes you think that you are wasting your and ...[text shortened]... me by thinking about the moves. This can be psycologically crushing if he has a better position.
    Quiet true. As a slow player myself I must say it is infuriating when your opponent refutes your great move that took you 20 mins to analyse in just 1 min.
  8. Standard member peacedog
    Highlander
    01 Apr '10 11:19
    Originally posted by jankrb
    Sorry, I read to quick. Missed OTB, just saw "slow opponents".

    In OTB, when I am faced with a slow opponent, I allways try to complicate the position. Hoping it will cost him even more time.
    In the end of the game they usually make mistakes....
    I read some good advice once(I think it was in Simon Webb's Chess for Tigers*) that when playing a slow player who often gets in time trouble, one should steer the game into quiet positions where he has several options of equal merit. Aparently it was found that in those sort of positions, slow players waste the most time. What Rook to put on the open file? Is a question that may keep these slowcoaches thinking for half a hour, even though often it makes no difference.


    *Wasn't IM Webb murdered by his son, or something like that? Or did I dream it?
  9. 01 Apr '10 11:24 / 1 edit
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    Daydream
  10. 01 Apr '10 11:24
    Originally posted by peacedogAnother thing is some fast players move so fast and confidantly that it makes you think that you are wasting your and your opponents time by thinking about the moves. This can be psycologically crushing if he has a better position.[/b]
    I only play OTB when someone challenges me since I am not part of a club or anything. Nothing serious

    HOWEVER: Some people play exceedingly slowly. If this is the case usually I pull out pen and paper and just write or draw out my following moves, or move ideas. I find the board analysis Correspondence Chess ability on RHP to be great for that kind of thing!


    Just remember that Fast play in OTB can be used to inflict some stunning swindles and upsets, as noted by Wikipedia:

    "Krogius notes that a player who is unhappy with the course of the game sometimes "enters time trouble with the idea of exploiting it as a form of psychological warfare. This . . . is often successful: the opponent, hoping to gain a quick victory during the other side's time trouble, becomes excited and loses the necessary critical approach. . . . The result is a loss of detachment in controlling one's emotions which leads to serious errors, and thus the intentional use of time trouble is often justified"
  11. 01 Apr '10 11:58
    Originally posted by Tiwaking
    I only play OTB when someone challenges me since I am not part of a club or anything. Nothing serious

    HOWEVER: Some people play exceedingly slowly. If this is the case usually I pull out pen and paper and just write or draw out my following moves, or move ideas. I find the board analysis Correspondence Chess ability on RHP to be great for that kind of th ...[text shortened]... h leads to serious errors, and thus the intentional use of time trouble is often justified"
    i think its against the rules to write anything down other than your moves in a tournament at least. I could be wrong though.
  12. Standard member peacedog
    Highlander
    01 Apr '10 12:03
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    i think its against the rules to write anything down other than your moves in a tournament at least. I could be wrong though.
    It is now. You used to be able to write your moves down before you played them, but not anymore. Writing down variations has always been a no no.

    But this guy is talking about casual games...
  13. 01 Apr '10 14:11
    Here is another GOOD tip for playing slow opponents - keep the position very tight and closed, they will be completely wasting their time then, as they will likely get nothing for all the time spent thinking, and you should be able to open up into a better position for the late stages when they are short on time.

    N.B. Beware not to assume they will blunder or run out of time just because of their slow play, most time trouble guys I have encountered are actually quite competent blitzers when forced to move quickly .
  14. Standard member peacedog
    Highlander
    01 Apr '10 14:38
    Originally posted by Tyrannosauruschex
    N.B. Beware not to assume they will blunder or run out of time just because of their slow play, most time trouble guys I have encountered are actually quite competent blitzers when forced to move quickly .[/b]
    I hear that.

    The worst thing a guy who is playing someone in time trouble to do is to try and out blitz them. For one you lose the advantage of more time to think. Secondly the bloke in time trouble will be more focused on the position, having been forced to look at all forcing variations. The only time it would be a good idea is if you are in a losing position. Then playing quickly and looking out for cheapos is the way to go:-)
  15. Subscriber C J Horse
    A stable personality
    01 Apr '10 14:55
    Cough.