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  1. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    30 May '09 07:57
    Back in the 70's and 80's I used to look upon Karpov as a cold, calculating, egotistical little man who could only function over a chess board. Perhaps he was at that time, but the last 2 decades have very much changed my opinion of him. In the last 20 years Karpov has become a great ambassador for chess. He has given countless lectures and exibitions around the world (some of them for free). He has opened several chess schools around the world, and enlisted other great players such as the Polgar sisters to teach chess in these schools. How many other former world champions have done as much? Not many, I'll wager. I'm not sure if Karpov could have beaten Fischer in 1975, but I am sure of this. Anatoly Karpov is my chess hero...NOT Bobby Fischer.
  2. 30 May '09 09:10
    Apparently he likes snooker too and played steve davis. The man is a legend.
  3. Subscriber no1marauder
    Humble and Kind
    30 May '09 12:25
    Originally posted by bill718
    Back in the 70's and 80's I used to look upon Karpov as a cold, calculating, egotistical little man who could only function over a chess board. Perhaps he was at that time, but the last 2 decades have very much changed my opinion of him. In the last 20 years Karpov has become a great ambassador for chess. He has given countless lectures and exibitions around ...[text shortened]... Fischer in 1975, but I am sure of this. Anatoly Karpov is my chess hero...NOT Bobby Fischer.
    There's an interesting interview in June's Chess Life with Karpov. He doesn't seem to harbor any ill-will towards Fischer and wishes they could have played.
  4. Standard member Ichibanov
    King of slow
    30 May '09 13:12
    I always thought that the way he seemed to embrace and take advantage of his position in the USSR system took his image down a notch. In particular, he seemed complicit in the measures taken by them vs Korchnoi's family during one of their championship bouts. Perhaps it was nothing more than a lack of courage to stand up to the powers that be for what is right, but other players before him did make those sorts of stands. Spassky did so at great cost when he (from what I read) disobeyed a direct "order" to abandon the Reykjavik match when Fischer was causing all the commotion early on.

    And, of course, the shenanigans at the end of the first match with Kasparov really reflected badly upon Karpov. Again, it's hard to tell if he played an active roll in all that or if those around him took the lead in what happened there, but he at least failed to "do the right thing" in that situation.

    But people change. And he was definitely one of the most active world champions, playing and winning a ton of strong tourneys in his heyday. I'd be very interested to see what he's been up to lately. No1...is that interview available outside the print version of the magazine? I'm not current with the USCF and haven't been able to find CL on newstands around here for years now.
  5. 30 May '09 13:26 / 1 edit
    Karpov went to Fischer's hotel and tried to persuade him to play.

    I think the last thing Kaprov wanted was to win it by default.
    He knew he would have to prove himself to the Chess World he
    was a worthy Champion. And he was.

    (Karpov won 28 out of the 34 tournaments in which he took part from 1975 to 1984.)
  6. Subscriber no1marauder
    Humble and Kind
    30 May '09 13:38
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Karpov went to Fischer's hotel and tried to persuade him to play.

    I think the last thing Kaprov wanted was to win it by default.
    He knew he would have to prove himself to the Chess World he
    was a worthy Champion. And he was.

    (Karpov won 28 out of the 34 tournaments in which he took part from 1975 to 1984.)
    According to the interview, Karpov met with Fischer in Tokyo AFTER Karpov had been awarded the WC. The meeting was arranged by Florencio Campomanes in June 1976 without Karpov's advance knowledge. Karpov's a little vague on why a match couldn't be arranged; he does claim that he doesn't think Fischer was psychologically ready to play. Who knows?

    Ichibanov: I just got the June issue yesterday; so far the USCF website still has excerpts from the May issue only.
  7. Standard member Ichibanov
    King of slow
    30 May '09 13:44 / 1 edit
    I do agree that he was the legitimate champion. He proved himself the best against all who would play him. Can't ask more from a champion than that.

    What are your thoughts on the non-chess stuff I mentioned, GP? Was he really the tool of the state he appeared to be? Is it even fair to bring such things into the discussion?

    [edit]

    Ah, thanks No1. I'll check it in a week or so and, hopefully, it'll be up.
  8. Subscriber no1marauder
    Humble and Kind
    30 May '09 13:53
    Originally posted by Ichibanov
    I do agree that he was the legitimate champion. He proved himself the best against all who would play him. Can't ask more from a champion than that.

    What are your thoughts on the non-chess stuff I mentioned, GP? Was he really the tool of the state he appeared to be? Is it even fair to bring such things into the discussion?

    [edit]

    Ah, thanks No1. I'll check it in a week or so and, hopefully, it'll be up.
    I don't know anything about the measures taken against Korchnoi's family and/or Karpov's alleged complicity in them.

    Karpov seems appreciative of the fact that the State support of chess in the USSR was extensive and undoubtedly helped the development of his and many others' game. I don't see why this should be held against him, even if other players are dismissive to the point of ingratitude about this support.

    Critically, he doesn't seem to have been guilty of any of the shenanigans in tournaments that Soviet players were guilty of in the 40's through the '60's.
  9. Standard member RECUVIC
    international loser
    30 May '09 13:59
    I personally met Karpov[not over a playing chessboard!]and found hm to be the polite generous charming person he was really known to be. In addition to being a truly great chess player he was also a great athlete of the system which existed in those days in Russia,and has since gone on to prove himself a great human being prepared to use his resources and world famous reputation to help many thousands less fortunate than himself.This is the real Karpov and a better promoter of chess for all ages and races there has never been. The world and chessworld is a far better place for the existence and brilliance of Anatoli Karpov.---------
  10. 30 May '09 16:33
    I too met him, spent a wonderful 2-3 hours just me and him talking chess.

    Certainly nobody in the Korchnoi camp thought Karpov had anything to
    do with the pressure that the USSR had put Korchnoi under.
    By that I mean he did not ask for any state help to put off Korchnoi.
  11. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    30 May '09 16:59
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    I too met him, spent a wonderful 2-3 hours just me and him talking chess.

    Certainly nobody in the Korchnoi camp thought Karpov had anything to
    do with the pressure that the USSR had put Korchnoi under.
    By that I mean he did not ask for any state help to put off Korchnoi.
    last summer I interviewed people for a job, and it turned out one of the applicants had played karpov! nothing fancy though, just taking part in a simul when karpov visited finland in the early 80s (1982 I think he said). too bad he didn't keep the score...

    didn't hire him. who the hell doesn't keep the score from playing karpov in 1982??? I'd have it framed on my wall!
  12. Standard member RECUVIC
    international loser
    30 May '09 17:38
    Likewise! many people chessplayers and non players whom I have spoken to had nothing negative to say about A.Karpov.Karpov v Korchnoi 1981 was entirely Korchnois' own doing[and undoing!]and not anything else as is evident from the games.Karpov had simply improved his already outstanding chess play to the point where even the most minor positional wrong doing by Korchnoi,was enough to spell his rapid failure.A very different story from 1978 when Korchnois' play was atleast the equal of Karpov! 1981 saw a slump in Korchnois play and an equally impressive improvement in Karpovs.All the other nonbsense stuff going on at the time cannot change those simple fact.
  13. 30 May '09 17:54
    Here's a cute video with Karpov -- I think it highlights many of the points people are making about him.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?gl=GB&hl=en-GB&v=ipdYFuIX-Gw&feature=channel_page
  14. 30 May '09 18:01
    Originally posted by bill718
    In the last 20 years Karpov has become a great ambassador for chess... Anatoly Karpov is my chess hero...
    Hi,
    Can you give us a good chess game played by Karpov?
  15. Standard member Redmike
    Godless Commie
    30 May '09 18:16
    His 'My Best Games' is worth buying - a very good collection, some excellent games, quality annotations. I'd recommend it.