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  1. 14 Feb '07 19:45
    I think I'll pick this up, if only to humiliate others when I beat them.

    Does anyone have any general tips for this?
  2. Standard member Diet Coke
    Forum Vampire
    14 Feb '07 19:47
    A ear piece linked to a grandmaster watching the game always helps.

    Other than that.

    Good luck!
  3. 14 Feb '07 19:55
    peek lot.
  4. 14 Feb '07 20:18 / 1 edit
    First of all you need to really keep track of all your pieces - what is pinned, what defends what, etc. Second you need to deal with "residual images" - that is for example a captured pawn that for some reason you still count on the board - if you have good memory you can try "browsing" through the history of the previous moves. This will also improve your ability to look forward, and calculate deeper while keeping track of the current position.
    Bear in mind that some tactics will go unnoticed - usually your perception is more limited than when you look at the board, most probably because you need to devote part of your attention to keep track of what's going on.
    And, of course, you must also keep track of your opponents actions, pieces, plans, etc.
    Memory exercises and visualization techniques will always help you when playing blindfolded.
  5. 14 Feb '07 20:23
    One thing that seems to help is just try to stick to very normal position for you. and trade down so there is less on the board. I have tryed blindfold chess. I think it is fun to play. It is hard thought Try to play in a place that is not noise! That can be distracting
  6. 14 Feb '07 20:35
    frankly speaking, it is not so hard. although you don't remember exact location of every piece (pawns usually), it does not matter if you just know the basic themes and plans you normally follow. I've played against 1500 player and played a good game. I lost thou.
  7. 14 Feb '07 21:28
    Originally posted by ilywrin
    First of all you need to really keep track of all your pieces - what is pinned, what defends what, etc. Second you need to deal with "residual images" - that is for example a captured pawn that for some reason you still count on the board - if you have good memory you can try "browsing" through the history of the previous moves. This will also improve your a ...[text shortened]... emory exercises and visualization techniques will always help you when playing blindfolded.
    Interestingly enough I am quite good at remembering some games I'm playing right now, and there notation off the top of my head, so I assume this would be useful.
  8. 14 Feb '07 21:33
    a chessboard is four chunks of 16 squares. these four chunks are identical. if you memorize just one (lets say a1- a4 to d4-d1) this will greatly improve your blidfold chess. after you master the first chunk move onto the second, third, and fourth. to master these chunks you should be able to play a bishop and then knight to every square available. do this blindfold of course. while you are doing this announce the coordinates aloud that the peice reaches. this method really worked great for me. allows me to beat my wife blindfold. great party trick
  9. 14 Feb '07 22:29 / 1 edit
    I play blindfold chess all the time.....lose every game and get lost and need help, but man it feels good to tell people I play blindfold chess.
  10. 15 Feb '07 23:55
    My head hurts...
  11. 16 Feb '07 01:19
    Originally posted by Bad wolf
    My head hurts...
    I lost...
  12. 16 Feb '07 01:34
    Originally posted by Bad wolf
    I think I'll pick this up, if only to humiliate others when I beat them.

    Does anyone have any general tips for this?
    Stand behind a big Redwood, you won't see a thing
  13. 16 Feb '07 01:53
    Originally posted by Bad wolf
    I think I'll pick this up, if only to humiliate others when I beat them.

    Does anyone have any general tips for this?
    Memorization is the key. I played some games blindfold versus some friends of mine - not strong players - winning all them within 40 moves. Some players say that you should play static pawn structures and solid systems like 'Colle System' but this self-limitations can lead to difficoult midgames and endgames if you are not familiar with resulting positions. You should build your own opening repertoire and familiarize with it, its midgames and its endgames. If you already know the ideas of the position it will be easier to play it, tactically and strategically. A good theoric knowledge is an important resource in endgames too.

    Analysis skills should be reduced while playing blindfold, but some good training can improve the 'visualization'.

    Here are some useful exercises to improve memorization and visualization:
    1) re-play all the moves (on a board) of your games without watching annotations and then control the correct move order;
    2) try to play games reading only the annotation;
    3) memorize diagrams in a book and reproduce them on a chessboard;
    4) Play blindfold!

    http://chesseye.alexander-fleischer.de/index.php
  14. 16 Feb '07 11:37 / 1 edit
    Pick a square, any square then without looking at the board: What colour is it?

    Without referring to a board move a knight from a1 to a8 to h8 to h1...when you get goo at this put a pawn or two in the way.

    Move a knight from e4 to h1 and back then to h8 and back and so on.

    Particularly good exercise if you find yourself kept waiting around somewhere for some reason. Never a dull moment.
  15. 16 Feb '07 23:17
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I read somewhere that some GM actually went insane from blindfold Chess. Have you heard this before? I could have sworn it was Morphy.