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  1. Standard member YCP
    05 Dec '10 21:49
    After reading Chernev's Logical chess move by move, it's time for a new book! I'm rated 1650 on chess.com and FICS. I was thinking Nunn's Understanding chess move by move, Nimzo's My system, but if there's anything else anyone would recommend me please do so! Think: "What book helped me when I was 1650?"

    Thanks in advance!
  2. 05 Dec '10 22:16
    It's hard to say without more clarification.

    Is that your FICS blitz or standard rating? Is it provisional, and what's your rating deviation? Could you post a game of yours, or a link to your chess.com account, so we can get an idea of where you are?
  3. Standard member YCP
    05 Dec '10 22:30
    Originally posted by EinZweiDrei
    It's hard to say without more clarification.

    Is that your FICS blitz or standard rating? Is it provisional, and what's your rating deviation? Could you post a game of yours, or a link to your chess.com account, so we can get an idea of where you are?
    1650 is my FICS standard rating. I've recently joined a chess club, where the coach is 1850. I play againts him a lot, and I think we're about the same. Here are a couple of games (I'm black in the second one).



  4. Standard member pdunne
    Badmaster
    06 Dec '10 10:00
    Forget Nimzowitsch. Learn to walk before you try running. Although Nimzowitsch's book is pitched as at least partly for the less experienced, the parts that are most useful are very advanced.

    Tarrasch's The Game of Chess is still a very good general text; don't be put off by thinking its "for beginners". It will help with most aspects of your game: endgame, opening, tactics, simple positional themes.

    Your first aim until you get to 2000 (or even higher) is to improve at tactics. For this, get Ivaschenko's School of Chess Combinations: 3 volumes, 1a, 1b, 2. They are the best I've ever seen.

    Your second aim is to improve your understanding of basic positional chess. For this, playing over well-annotated master games is very helpful, provided they are at "your level" -- I think the sophisticated play of a modern GM is way over my head when the object is to improve my game rather than just enjoy a good game of chess. The best games collection for this is Tarrasch's 300 Games of Chess. This provides a thorough grounding in classical chess, which is essential before you come to look at more advanced ideas (e.g. Nimzowitsch).

    Depending on your budget, pick up Réti's "Modern Ideas in Chess" and/or "Masters of the Chessboard" as well. I found his explanations were more systematic than Tarrasch's, and they will help to round out the picture you get from Tarrasch.

    "The Game of Chess" provides basic endings; if you feel the need for more, Averbakh has a handy little book, the English title of which is I think "Endgames: Essential Knowledge".

    These few books provide the basis for a course of self-instruction lasting several years -- seriously!
  5. 06 Dec '10 12:16
    Seirawan's Winning Chess series can't be discounted either. Even if you don't need the first couple of books, the 'Brilliancies' book offers some good annotated games.

    Chernev's 'Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played' is my favorite game collection, but I'm not sure if it exists in algebraic notation, sadly.
  6. 06 Dec '10 12:41
    Chernev's 'Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played' is the
    next logical step after 'Logical Chess.' an excellent book.
  7. Standard member YCP
    06 Dec '10 14:56 / 2 edits
    @pdunne: Tarrasch's The game of chess really looks like it is for beginners, it stars by explaining what is needed to play chess....
    About School of chess combinations - I think I'm fine with tactics, and there are tones of puzzles on the internet. I would like to improve my strategy.

    @EinZweiDrei and GreenPawn- Chernev's 'Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played' looks good, but it doesn't have algebric notation....

    Why hasn't anyone said anything about Nunn's Understanding chess move by move.

    Currently the top candidates are:
    1)How to Reassess Your Chess, Fourth edition, Jeremy Silman
    2) Understanding chess move by move, John Nunn
    3)Lessons in chess strategy, Valeri Beim
    4)How to play dynamic chess, Valeri Beim
  8. 06 Dec '10 15:05
    The descriptive notation is unfortunate, but all I can say is, if you can struggle through it, you'll be rewarded with a fantastic book.

    There was a discussion on descriptive notation a while back: http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthread.php?subject=Chess_Notation&threadid=135733

    In my opinion, it offers one distinct advantage to cash-strapped students such as myself: no one wants to buy descriptive books, so you can usually pick them up for under $10. For instance, there is a used copy of the Chernev book selling for under $3 on Amazon.

    Might as well make that small investment and see if you can tolerate the notation.
  9. 06 Dec '10 16:08 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by YCP
    Why hasn't anyone said anything about Nunn's Understanding chess move by move.
    Have you read any reviews? Failing input from the RHP guys, the Chesscafe review back in 2001 by Taylor Kingston will give you a good preview. Kingston is rated around 1800 USCF, and he gives some snippets of annotation examples where he compares the differences between Nunn's book and Chernev's book.

    Here's the link:
    http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review269.pdf

    There's also a couple of shorter reviews by Donaldson and Watson on Silman's site.
  10. Standard member YCP
    06 Dec '10 16:35
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    Have you read any reviews? Failing input from the RHP guys, the Chesscafe review back in 2001 by Taylor Kingston will give you a good preview. Kingston is rated around 1800 USCF, and he gives some snippets of annotation examples where he compares the differences between Nunn's book and Chernev's book.

    Here's the link:
    http://www.chesscafe.com/text/revi ...[text shortened]... 9.pdf

    There's also a couple of shorter reviews by Donaldson and Watson on Silman's site.
    Thanks for the link.... This (http://www.amazon.com/How-Reassess-Your-Chess-Fourth/dp/1890085138/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1291647387&sr=8-1)is the book that is my first choice currently, but I'm not sure if it is released yet (based on review's comments). Does anyone know?
  11. 06 Dec '10 16:50
    Originally posted by YCP
    Thanks for the link.... This (http://www.amazon.com/How-Reassess-Your-Chess-Fourth/dp/1890085138/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1291647387&sr=8-1)is the book that is my first choice currently, but I'm not sure if it is released yet (based on review's comments). Does anyone know?
    I saw a 4th edition HTRYC sitting on the shelf at a local Barnes & Noble book store a couple of days ago.
  12. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    06 Dec '10 17:46 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Chernev's 'Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played' is the
    next logical step after 'Logical Chess.' an excellent book.
    agreed on Chernev, I was a big fan of that book.

    Various categories for an improving 1600


    tactics - Sharpen your tactics Anatoly Lein. (very good book with various levels of tactics- idk if nowadays you need to buy a book on tactics with so many websites out there..)

    biography - Morphy or Capablanca.

    Middlegame - The amateur's mind - silman, Pawn structure chess- soltis.

    endgame- winning chess endgames- just the facts - alburt
  13. Standard member pdunne
    Badmaster
    06 Dec '10 18:43
    Originally posted by YCP
    @pdunne: Tarrasch's The game of chess really looks like it is for beginners, it stars by explaining what is needed to play chess....
    About School of chess combinations - I think I'm fine with tactics, and there are tones of puzzles on the internet. I would like to improve my strategy.
    Why ask for advice if you already know better?!
  14. Standard member YCP
    06 Dec '10 18:53 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by pdunne
    Why ask for advice if you already know better?!
    It is for brainstorming.... You can't expect me to buy a book only because you or someone else suggested it. Thanks you for your advice, but I'm the one who is going to decide what I'm going to buy. I will take a look at all the books that have been mentioned in this thread and then see which one I think is best.
  15. 07 Dec '10 00:09
    This (http://www.amazon.com/How-Reassess-Your-Chess-Fourth/dp/1890085138/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1291647387&sr=8-1)is the book that is my first choice currently,
    I am surprised no one has mentioned Michael Stean's Simple Chess. I have bought many chess books over the years but have only been able to finish a few. I found Silman's How to reassess your chess 3rd edition long winded and dull. It was a difficult read for me, and it did not help me that much. I had the same problem with Silmans' chess endings book (and found a better, shorter alternative). Stean's book is not simple. It is short, inexpensive and a joy for a chess player of my ability. I have reread it a second time, and I am sure I would enjoy and learn from a third reading. I believe a strength of the book for me is the use of annotated GM games. I have Chernev's Most Instructive Games, but it is a lot longer than Stean's book and I found that I learned more quickly with Stean, so stayed with it. Furthermore, although I started out with descriptive notation (Chernev), I find I now prefer to stay with algebraic (Stean) notation.