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  1. 10 Oct '06 00:48
    sorry if this is a dumb question... but i'm not sure. are you allowed to check the opponent with a castle? i.e. when you move the rook to castle it simultaneously checks.

    i wasn't sure if this was similar to the no-castling-through-check rule.
  2. 10 Oct '06 00:49
    that is a legal move.
  3. 10 Oct '06 09:25
    why can't you castle when in check?
  4. Standard member Dragon Fire
    Lord of all beasts
    10 Oct '06 09:32
    Originally posted by Fettzilla
    why can't you castle when in check?
    Because the rule of chess say you cannot!
  5. 10 Oct '06 09:33
    Same reason you can't make a knight move with a bishop - it's against the rules of chess. You can't castle when you are in check and you can't castle if the king moves through check. Also, something I learnt quite recently is that if you are in a tournament and playing strictly by the rules you must touch your king first when castling. If you first touch the rook then you must move the rook by any legal move but castling is no longer allowed.
  6. 10 Oct '06 09:44
    Originally posted by Fettzilla
    why can't you castle when in check?
    However, you can still castle if the rook is being attacked.
  7. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    10 Oct '06 12:33
    white to move:



    19.O-O# was played

    From Suess-Hurme, 1969
  8. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    10 Oct '06 12:35
    White to move:



    18.O-O# was played

    From Rauschenberger-Eckl, 1988
  9. 10 Oct '06 13:09
    Originally posted by Dragon Fire
    Because the rule of chess say you cannot!
    But why?
  10. 10 Oct '06 13:18
    Yes!
    Also why aren't I allowed to advance my pawns 3 squares on their initial moves, instead of just 1 or 2?
    It's just not fair, I tells ya!
  11. 10 Oct '06 14:10
    Originally posted by Mahout
    Also, something I learnt quite recently is that if you are in a tournament and playing strictly by the rules you must touch your king first when castling. If you first touch the rook then you must move the rook by any legal move but castling is no longer allowed.
    I believe this varies by federation; I don't have my USCF rulebook handy, but I believe it had a special note mentioning that you could touch either piece first. Now I have to look this one up after work before I TD another event.
  12. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    10 Oct '06 14:11
    Originally posted by OrangeKing
    I believe this varies by federation; I don't have my USCF rulebook handy, but I believe it had a special note mentioning that you could touch either piece first. Now I have to look this one up after work before I TD another event.
    FIDE: must touch the king first
    USCF: may touch either piece first
  13. 10 Oct '06 14:17
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    FIDE: must touch the king first
    USCF: may touch either piece first
    Then FIDE rule is better.
  14. 10 Oct '06 14:25
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    FIDE: must touch the king first
    USCF: may touch either piece first
    The USCF used to use the FIDE rule as well, but they changed it recently. I can only speculate that they did it because of the scholastic push and the desire to make the game as kid-friendly as possible.

    Personally I find that it is hard to play a tournament around here once you're out of (high) school as non-scholastic events are few and far between.
  15. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    10 Oct '06 14:34
    Originally posted by zebano
    The USCF used to use the FIDE rule as well, but they changed it recently. I can only speculate that they did it because of the scholastic push and the desire to make the game as kid-friendly as possible.

    Personally I find that it is hard to play a tournament around here once you're out of (high) school as non-scholastic events are few and far between.
    "The U.S. rule regarding castling is also far more sensible, according to [Steve] Immit. FIDE Laws describes the process of castling such that the king must be moved prior to the rook. Immit describes this as a rule that, 'serves no other purpose than to make disputes.' The USCF allows either piece to be touched first."

    http://beta.uschess.org/frontend/news_7_127.php