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  1. 26 May '18 16:50
    What frustrated me when I started playing chess is that even when I tried to follow general good rules, I still got beat by people who broke those rules.

    I suppose it was because I didn't understand the idea behind the rules. Of course my board vision was horrible and that doesn't help either. But still I think understanding the reason for the rule is more important than knowing the rule itself.
  2. Standard member lemon lime
    go phish
    26 May '18 17:48
    Originally posted by @eladar
    What frustrated me when I started playing chess is that even when I tried to follow general good rules, I still got beat by people who broke those rules.

    I suppose it was because I didn't understand the idea behind the rules. Of course my board vision was horrible and that doesn't help either. But still I think understanding the reason for the rule is more important than knowing the rule itself.
    I take it you mean general rules of thumb. Such as moving rooks to open files, and not blocking your own pieces. And good advice such as always looking over the whole board, and checking all checks... I've lost a lot of games (including games I should have won) for no other reason than because I didn't look at the whole board and check all checks.
  3. 26 May '18 18:15
    Originally posted by @lemon-lime
    I take it you mean general rules of thumb. Such as moving rooks to open files, and not blocking your own pieces. And good advice such as always looking over the whole board, and checking all checks... I've lost a lot of games (including games I should have won) for no other reason than because I didn't look at the whole board and check all checks.
    When I first started the rules I was told was in the opening never move the same piece twice, put your pieces on good squares and castle early.

    That really didn't do much for me.
  4. Standard member lemon lime
    go phish
    26 May '18 19:35
    Originally posted by @eladar
    When I first started the rules I was told was in the opening never move the same piece twice, put your pieces on good squares and castle early.

    That really didn't do much for me.
    Yeah, I was told "castle early, castle often". It's supposed to be good for protecting the king, and getting a rook into play. But if the side you castle on is not well protected then in effect your king is cornered with no where to go. So unless there is an immediate threat I like to empty out the back row and give myself a choice on which side to castle.

    By the way, what the heck is a "good square"?
  5. 26 May '18 20:01 / 1 edit
    I asked the same question about good squares. I suppose Nf3 is a general one most would agree.

    I remember the first time I played a guy who opened 1.f3 and thought what an idiot. So I did what I was told and castled kingside then got mated shortly after.
  6. 26 May '18 20:47
    From what I have come to understand....the answer to the question of what is a good square is it depends.
  7. 27 May '18 12:24
    Originally posted by @eladar
    What frustrated me when I started playing chess is that even when I tried to follow general good rules, I still got beat by people who broke those rules.

    I suppose it was because I didn't understand the idea behind the rules. Of course my board vision was horrible and that doesn't help either. But still I think understanding the reason for the rule is more important than knowing the rule itself.
    But still I think understanding the reason for the rule is more important than knowing the rule itself.


    Bingo! This applies to a number of areas of chess. An excellent way of dealing with this issue is to gather together a list of your questions and a few of your games and spending some time with a chess coach. Just a few 1hr. sessions is all it will take to answer your questions, and put together a long term strategy to get you to the level you want to be.
  8. Donation ketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    27 May '18 14:25
    Originally posted by @lemon-lime
    Yeah, I was told "castle early, castle often". It's supposed to be good for protecting the king, and getting a rook into play. But if the side you castle on is not well protected then in effect your king is cornered with no where to go. So unless there is an immediate threat I like to empty out the back row and give myself a choice on which side to castle.

    By the way, what the heck is a "good square"?
    The safer a square is the gooder it is imo
  9. Subscriber WOLFE63
    Fair and Balanced
    27 May '18 14:32
    Originally posted by @ketchuplover
    The safer a square is the gooder it is imo
    A good square is a square that offers a piece it's maximum possible mobility for both attack and defense. These are, generally speaking, in the early part of the game...those squares in the center of the board.

    Control of e4,e5,d4 and d5 are the first points of contention in almost all games.
  10. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    27 May '18 20:11
    Originally posted by @eladar
    What frustrated me when I started playing chess is that even when I tried to follow general good rules, I still got beat by people who broke those rules.

    I suppose it was because I didn't understand the idea behind the rules. Of course my board vision was horrible and that doesn't help either. But still I think understanding the reason for the rule is more important than knowing the rule itself.
    Chess rules are for positions that defy direct calculation on what to do next. Calculation takes precedence over all of them.
  11. 27 May '18 20:42
    Originally posted by @bigdoggproblem
    Chess rules are for positions that defy direct calculation on what to do next. Calculation takes precedence over all of them.
    Calculation depends on one's own strength.
  12. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    28 May '18 20:04
    Originally posted by @eladar
    Calculation depends on one's own strength.
    Or reverse it: one's strength depends on the quality of calculation.
  13. 28 May '18 20:18
    Originally posted by @bigdoggproblem
    Or reverse it: one's strength depends on the quality of calculation.
    Accuracy of calculation also depends on the strength of the opponent. Try guessing what an 800 will do lol.

    Before you say well then you will destroy them anyhow, what if you are an 800 too?
  14. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    28 May '18 20:24
    Originally posted by @eladar
    Accuracy of calculation also depends on the strength of the opponent. Try guessing what an 800 will do lol.

    Before you say well then you will destroy them anyhow, what if you are an 800 too?
    I have a 900 player in my Club. I know exactly what he will try to do each and every game we play. He will spend 5-10 moves contriving to threaten mate in one. Once I see it and defend, he will drift through the rest of the game, losing pieces right and left until I finally checkmate.

    The point of the post was, to get better, work on calculation skill.
  15. 28 May '18 20:29
    Originally posted by @bigdoggproblem
    I have a 900 player in my Club. I know exactly what he will try to do each and every game we play. He will spend 5-10 moves contriving to threaten mate in one. Once I see it and defend, he will drift through the rest of the game, losing pieces right and left until I finally checkmate.

    The point of the post was, to get better, work on calculation skill.
    Yes but the question is how does the 800 develop that skill efficiently? I have gotten better after losing many many many games.

    The only way I can know to get better is to lose many more. My visualization skills are far better than they used to be. I think chess has changed how my brain is wired in that area.