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  1. 17 Dec '05 19:55
    I was recently studying chess, when i saw a movie on A&E called "Knights of the South Bronxe" (no comments on that) and there is several parts where the main character doesnt use a board, but instead walks around while his opponent tells him the moves he just made and the man visualises it in his mind and tells him which one of his pieces to move where. I was wondering if that would in anyway having that skill help my game, so i did some research on the internet, and came up with this site called www.janmatthies.info or something like that. you can access it from google by typing free chess openings and searching and this site called academic chess will be one of the first to come up. click it and scroll down the page to the one talking about chess visualisation and click it. This site has 11 things to help you get better with the mind game, each one more difficult than the first. i was wondering if there is really any reason for this. how can it help you if it even can? any thoughts are great. thanks.
    -trallphaz
  2. Standard member Ravello
    The RudeĀ©
    17 Dec '05 20:02
    Johnny,the link you gave (www.janmatthies.info) it's a site in german language......
  3. 17 Dec '05 20:03
    Originally posted by Ravello
    Johnny,the link you gave (www.janmatthies.info) it's a site in german language......
    oops i think i messed up than
  4. 17 Dec '05 20:05
    Originally posted by trallphaz
    oops i think i messed up than
    ok enter the web address i wrote, click the three letters on the side the link that says "CVT" and then click the words that say chess visuallisation training. thatll get u there
  5. 17 Dec '05 20:45
    Chess visulation exercises help you see the board better and do improve your play. Your opponent makes a sacrifice and your not sure if you should take it. If you can see several moves ahead then you will be able to determine if you should take the sacrifice or not. That how chess visulation helps you. It also helps you finding longer mates and combinations. If found that if you do enough tactics then you will learn it naturally.
  6. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    18 Dec '05 00:59
    here's the link.
    http://www.janmatthies.info/chess/cvt/cvt.htm

    I'm not so sure if it makes you any better at chess, but it's good fun.
  7. 19 Dec '05 05:07
    Originally posted by RahimK
    If you can see several moves ahead then you will be able to determine if you should take the sacrifice or not.
    It's seems like a monumental task of visualizing 'x' amount of move ahead considering the unpredictability of your opponent and the numerous possibilities. How does one take these factors into consideration without blowing a gasket? (know what I mean?)
  8. 20 Dec '05 01:01
    Originally posted by gonzalez70
    It's seems like a monumental task of visualizing 'x' amount of move ahead considering the unpredictability of your opponent and the numerous possibilities. How does one take these factors into consideration without blowing a gasket? (know what I mean?)
    I think the best way is to think if you were your opponent what would the best move be? This for a few of there moves and then for a few of your moves thats kinnda how i do it but whatever works for you I'm sure with time you will find a system.
  9. 20 Dec '05 18:03
    It exercises your brain to enhance visual perception. Many chess players are touted for their photographic mind. Everyone has the potential to have a so called photographic memory, it is like everything else, you have to use it to have it or loose it.
  10. Standard member Bowmann
    Non-Subscriber
    20 Dec '05 18:24
    Originally posted by trallphaz
    I was wondering if that would in anyway having that skill help my game...
    No, it won't.

    Practise in recognizing and exploiting board patterns (tactics) and planning (strategy) will.
  11. 20 Dec '05 18:56
    the link isnt working for me
  12. 20 Dec '05 22:21
    Being able to visulize is a natural talent and would be hard to improve, I don't think it helps you chess ability. I read somewhere most GM's don't even need a board to play but it makes it easier to one.
  13. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    20 Dec '05 23:28
    Originally posted by alexstclaire
    Being able to visulize is a natural talent and would be hard to improve, I don't think it helps you chess ability. I read somewhere most GM's don't even need a board to play but it makes it easier to one.
    I see a distinct improvement in my visual memory after starting chess. not only in chess-related things (I see some of the games while in bed trying to sleep. most probably have similar experiences. some situations I remember from months ago.), but also in other fields. I can remember number sequences about twice the length as before, and also recall them with less error. so visualizing most certainly seems to be a trainable skill.
  14. 21 Dec '05 01:30
    Originally posted by wormwood
    I see a distinct improvement in my visual memory after starting chess. not only in chess-related things (I see some of the games while in bed trying to sleep. most probably have similar experiences. some situations I remember from months ago.), but also in other fields. I can remember number sequences about twice the length as before, and also recall them with less error. so visualizing most certainly seems to be a trainable skill.
    I have (had) that program for some time, and really worked on it, Its intesting, I see a move, it looks like a complicated position, so I save it for when I got more time, then like in the middle of the night, the move comes to me just like that. I hardly remember the position.

    My rating improved from 1200 to 1450 average, which is still very low
  15. 21 Dec '05 01:43
    Originally posted by wormwood
    I see a distinct improvement in my visual memory after starting chess. not only in chess-related things (I see some of the games while in bed trying to sleep. most probably have similar experiences. some situations I remember from months ago.), but also in other fields. I can remember number sequences about twice the length as before, and also recall them with less error. so visualizing most certainly seems to be a trainable skill.
    To some degree, it is trainable I think.